Aktuelle Zeit: 28.09.2021, 23:56

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Forumsregeln


Die Forumsregeln lesen



Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 13 Beiträge ] 
Autor Nachricht
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 19:16 
Offline
Lucas' sugarhorse
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 21.11.2010, 15:31
Beiträge: 14058
Wohnort: Lost in T's eyes
Extended video
https://audiblerange.com/categories/ins ... -armitage/

Bild




Zitat:
A Heart-To-Heart With Richard Armitage
We sat down with the actor and narrator of "Romeo and Juliet: A Novel" to talk about this bold new take on Shakespeare's classic tale, the darker side of love, and why there's nothing like listening to a great story.
By Reid Armbruster Feb 14, 2017 10:49 AM


Note: Text has been edited for clarity and will not match video exactly.

Audible: How familiar were you with the story of Romeo and Juliet before this production?

Richard Armitage: I feel that my contact with Romeo and Juliet has been really prolific throughout my life, without my necessarily knowing it. I saw the musical West Side Story when I was really little, and I hadn’t quite figured out that it was taking the essence of Romeo and Juliet and putting it into that magnificent musical.

I’m a big classical music fan, so I was very aware of the Prokofiev score and the Tchaikovsky score, two ballet scores of Romeo and Juliet. I’ve seen productions of it in dance. When I got to drama school, we studied Shakespeare and, of course, Romeo and Juliet came through.

A: Romeo and Juliet: A Novel marks the second time you’ve performed a Shakespearean novelization by David Hewson, the first being Hamlet. What makes these projects so compelling?

RA: What David Hewson did with the script was so exciting to me. I really loved the fact that he followed avenues that Shakespeare suggested but didn’t necessarily go down. I love that he will take the essence of Shakespeare’s words and create modern dialogue.

The thing that I found most stimulating about removing the bonds of Shakespeare’s poetry is that it brings the story into a very contemporary setting, even though it’s still set in 1499. I feel like the modern reader can listen to these characters, and listen to this story, understand Juliet’s perspective, understand Romeo’s perspective, and understand the perspective of a family who are really at odds with each other.

A: It’s hard to believe we’re talking about spoilers within the context of Romeo and Juliet, but — without giving anything major away — what new wrinkles to the story surprised you?

RA: One of the things that really surprised me — and I actually had to go to Shakespeare’s play just to check that it wasn’t something I’d missed — was the fact that David Hewson had made the two families wine growers with rival grapes on the vine. The fact that their family feud was based on the popularity of their product and trade, which I felt was, in a way, insignificant and trivial, but at the same time very important to those families because it really defines their status in society and the survival of their line.

A: David Hewson is a master at setting the stage for listeners. Could you say a little about how he brings us into his world?

RA: He really manages to convey time and place, particularly with this story. It’s so interesting: the people that he references, the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci, the discovery of the New World. It really gives you a sense of that burning desire for opportunity as they’re about to step into the 1500s. Within the first page, I was very excited to learn what was going to happen next.

A: Rumor has it you got a surprise visit in the studio from Mr. Hewson.

RA: It was the second day of recording. A gentleman walked in, and he sat down and said, “Oh, hello, I’m the writer.” I immediately thought, “Oh my God. He’s going to have to listen to me making a pig’s ear of his work,” but he was absolutely delightful.

I found him fascinating because I truly understood the level of research that went into the creating of the novel. He’d been to Verona. He’d walked on foot around the city so that he could describe the shape of the crenulations on the city walls and feel the heat. He really breathes life into the context, which I found interesting.

A: How did you approach voicing the characters?

RA: I really try to look at what the author was hoping for when they wrote the work— whether that’s David Hewson or William Shakespeare — and the tone of the piece itself.

With Romeo and Juliet: A Novel, I didn’t want to create too many big characters. Aside from the nurse, the character voices are more subtle than I’ve made in the past. At the same time, I needed to identify where people come from and who their allegiances are, whether they are nobility or staff or beggars on the street. So I chose to make the Capulets sound one way and the Montagues have a slightly different sound. I also put a little Italian voice in there, just for my own pleasure.

A: This is a much different Juliet than the one we know from Shakespeare. How has the character been reimagined?

RA: As you listen to the book, you’ll understand that her sensitivity and her sensibilities are of a very modern woman, which I found refreshing. And the remarkable thing is that, as a character, she herself understands that she’s a woman bound by her time. Ultimately, that drives the narrative. It drives you towards that point where you understand what she’s going to do and why.

The Elizabethan “melancholy male” was something that was celebrated. It meant that you were thinking and feeling, and that you questioned yourself. You questioned your emotions. David Hewson puts that into his female protagonist. Which, I think, makes her incredibly well rounded.

A: To your point, Juliet is very much a grown woman when the story begins. By contrast, Romeo is a boy who evolves into a man — and that journey is painful for him at times.

RA: He’s a pacifist until the moment when he’s faced with Tybalt, and he’s torn. Romeo is recognizing that his love, his passion for Juliet is hardening him as a man. It’s giving him resolve and the ability to actually murder somebody. It’s something that he’s uncomfortable with. It’s a new feeling. That self-realization, I think, is really interesting.

A: For him, the fact that even true love has a dark side is definitely a rude awakening.

RA: It’s one of the things that Shakespeare absolutely captures and believes in through all of his work, which is the idea of the dark and the light being in opposition to each other — and that without one you can’t have the other.

Life can’t always be viewed through rose-tinted spectacles. You have to go to the pit of despair in order to rise to the height of ecstasy. Both Romeo and Juliet recognize that.

A: So, as Friar Lawrence says, is “slow and moderate” love the only kind that lasts?

RA: I guess I agree in theory, but as human beings we seek out the opposite. I don’t think we seek out patient moderation in love. I think it’s ultimately what is good for us, but we want to be intoxicated to the point of losing ourselves. It’s where, as human beings, we are at odds with what’s good for us.

A: What makes listening to a story so special?

RA: The more successful audiobooks that I’ve listened to myself, I’ve realized that it’s absolutely about performance and immersing an audience in the world that you’re depicting.

Ultimately, who doesn’t love to be told a story? Even before we understand words, we are sung to, we’re told stories. To be told a great story is ultimately what draws us to reading. It’s what drew me to acting. It’s acting in its most raw form, for me.

A: What would Shakespeare think of how we express ourselves today?

RA: I’m on Twitter, and I struggle to express myself in 140 characters. We have such access to an amazing vocabulary, thanks to Shakespeare. The vocabulary of the Elizabethan mind was actually about three times the size of what we use today.

I want to be a pioneer for the use of great words, because when you find the word that you really, really need, and you use it, it’s very satisfying. If you try to describe what it is you’re feeling, and you can’t, then I think that’s a tragedy for us as human beings. You need words.

Photo: Chris Sanders

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imL9EYYRb_A



Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags:
Verfasst: 14.02.2017, 19:16 


Nach oben
  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Romeo and Juliet (2016)
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 19:24 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 29151
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
:hurra: Danke, Nimue. Nach dieser Ankündigung hatte ich mich schon gefragt, womit man uns wohl überraschen wird:

Zitat:
David Hewson ‏@david_hewson

I wonder if there's a Valentine's Day extra in store for fans of @RCArmitage and Romeo & Juliet


https://twitter.com/david_hewson/status/831427985827831808

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 20:25 
Offline
Lees Aquarobic Trainee
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 21.01.2017, 21:40
Beiträge: 136
Wohnort: Elbflorenz ;-)
Eigentlich wollte ich ja heute meinen therapeutisch wichtigen Aufsatz "Mr.D and I" schreiben ... Bild ... aber daraus wird wohl nichts ... :nix: ... weil ich "leider" den ganzen Abend vor diesem Clip sitzen und jedes einzelne Wort analysieren "muss". 8) :mrgreen:

Zitat:
I don’t think we seek out patient moderation in love. I think it’s ultimately what is good for us, but we want to be intoxicated to the point of losing ourselves. It’s where, as human beings, we are at odds with what’s good for us.

Oh, Richaaaaard!!! :burn: :burn: :burn: :dontgo:

:danke1: , liebe Nimue, fürs schnelle Herholen! :blum:

_________________
Bild

Le motif est quelque chose de secondaire, ce que je veux reproduire, c’est ce qu’il y a entre le motif et moi.
Claude Monet


Zuletzt geändert von Titania am 14.02.2017, 20:32, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.

Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 20:32 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 29151
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Titania hat geschrieben:
Ich finde es auch sehr bachtlich, dass das Interview jetzt schon schriftlich vorliegt. :daumen:

Das Interview ist ja schon älter - aus der Zeit der Aufnahme des Audiobooks. Audible hatte zuvor schon Schnippsel daraus für die Promo verwendet, es jetzt aber in Gänze passend zum Valentinstag "herausgerückt". :sigh:

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 20:33 
Offline
Lees Aquarobic Trainee
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 21.01.2017, 21:40
Beiträge: 136
Wohnort: Elbflorenz ;-)
Danke, liebe Laudine,

während Du Dein Posting schriebst, hatte ich das auch gerade mitgekriegt und editiert ... :lachen: ...

_________________
Bild

Le motif est quelque chose de secondaire, ce que je veux reproduire, c’est ce qu’il y a entre le motif et moi.
Claude Monet


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 20:50 
Offline
Squirrel's finest hidden treasure
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 03.01.2013, 00:15
Beiträge: 5498
Wohnort: Saarland
Danke Nimue für den Link. :blum:

Titania hat geschrieben:
Danke, liebe Laudine,

während Du Dein Posting schriebst, hatte ich das auch gerade mitgekriegt und editiert ... :lachen: ...

Und ich habe mich schon gewundert, warum in meinem Zitat nur die Hälfte stand, was Du geschrieben hast. :lachen: Habe es dann ganz gelassen (wollte eh das schreiben, was Laudine schrieb).

Ich hab grad akuten Wuschelreflex... :drool: :aww: :heartthrow:

_________________
Bild


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 20:59 
Offline
Little Miss Gisborne
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 23.03.2013, 17:59
Beiträge: 12982
Wohnort: Sachsenländle
Ich habe mich schon gewundert, dass wir das vollständige Interview noch nicht zu sehen bekommen haben. Audible weiß wirklich gute Valentinsgeschenke zu machen. :heartthrow:


Danke für's Rüberholen, Nimue! :kuss:

_________________
Bild


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 21:05 
Offline
Richard's purrrfect transylvanian bat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 29.01.2015, 19:51
Beiträge: 2047
Nicole1971 hat geschrieben:

Ich hab grad akuten Wuschelreflex... :drool: :aww: :heartthrow:

Geht mir auch so :sigh: , diese Haarlänge ist wirklich schön.

Und das Interview wärmt mal wieder mein Salatherz...
Das Grinsen, als er erwähnt, dass er ein bisschen Italienisch eingeflickt hat... :heartthrow: Die italienischen Schnipsel fand ich schon im ersten Interview sehr anziehend...

Und der Schlusssatz, in dem er darauf eingeht, dass er immer auf der Suche nach den wirklich passenden Worten ist, da bin ich ganz bei ihm. Ich liebe Wortspiele aller Art und bin immer beeindruckt, wenn sich jemand "blumig" und phantasievoll ausdrücken kann! Und das kann er, sogar manchmal auf Twitter!
Ich habe jetzt, dank Titanias Ausführungen, aber wirklich genau auf seine Stimm-Modulation und Ausdrucksweise geachtet, speziell die ak-zen-tu-ier-te Sprechweise, das ist schon ganz Richard (im Interview-Modus).
Und deswegen krümmen sich mir immer ein bisschen die Fußnägel, wenn ich ihn in amerikanischen, überdrehten Shows sehe, das ist einfach nicht sein natürlicher Lebensraum.

Danke für's Posten, Nimue!

Was mir noch einfiel: Hat er David Hewson bei 'Hamlet' nicht persönlich kennengelernt? Das klang jetzt gerade so...


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 21:21 
Offline
Little Miss Gisborne
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 23.03.2013, 17:59
Beiträge: 12982
Wohnort: Sachsenländle
Minou hat geschrieben:
Ich habe jetzt, dank Titanias Ausführungen, aber wirklich genau auf seine Stimm-Modulation und Ausdrucksweise geachtet, speziell die ak-zen-tu-ier-te Sprechweise, das ist schon ganz Richard (im Interview-Modus).
Und deswegen krümmen sich mir immer ein bisschen die Fußnägel, wenn ich ihn in amerikanischen, überdrehten Shows sehe, das ist einfach nicht sein natürlicher Lebensraum.


Ich glaube ja ehrlich gesagt nicht, dass Interviews, egal welcher Art sein "natürlicher Lebensraum" sind, ganz egal ob er nun in einer US-Show oder mit ein paar Leuten, samt Kamera auf der Couch sitzt. Er schätzt es aber sehr, wenn er sich bei solchen Dingen auf seinen Gegenüber konzentrieren kann. In einer Show ist das nicht so einfach.


Minou hat geschrieben:

Was mir noch einfiel: Hat er David Hewson bei 'Hamlet' nicht persönlich kennengelernt? Das klang jetzt gerade so...


Wahrscheinlich nicht... "Hamlet" war ja auch nicht alleine David Hewsons Werk. Daran hat ja auch noch A. J. Hartley mitgeschrieben.

_________________
Bild


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 14.02.2017, 22:19 
Offline
Mr. Turner's loveliest affair
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 22.11.2015, 13:20
Beiträge: 836
Wohnort: Beacon Hills
Mir fehlt es gerade am passenden Wortschatz, um die nach dem Genuss des Videos aufkeimenden Gefühle zu beschreiben. :aww:

_________________
Wenn das hier schon das Leben ist, was machen dann die Toten?
Wer kennt sich hier aus, wer hilft mir hier raus - aus der Verschwörung der Idioten?


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 15.02.2017, 00:13 
Offline
Percy's naughty little barfly
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 04.06.2011, 21:57
Beiträge: 6674
Ich mag ja das perfekte Timing der Audible-Marketingabteilung! :daumen: :grins: :grins:
Ansonsten nur so viel: Frau genießt, schweigt und guckt einfach mehrmals ...! :heart1: :pink: :burn:

PS, bevor ich mich in den undlichen Weiten des Videos verliere: Danke, Nimue, für Video und Transkript! :kuss:

_________________
Bild



Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 15.02.2017, 00:42 
Offline
Paul's love therapist
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 01.07.2016, 22:32
Beiträge: 1285
Ich sage auch :dankeschön: für das schöne Betthupferl :bed2:

:burn: :burn: :burn: :burn:
Jetzt mache ich ganz schnell das Licht aus und :schmacht: mich in den Schlaf :heart1: :heart1: :heart1:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
BeitragVerfasst: 15.02.2017, 08:13 
Offline
Richard's favourite bedtime storyteller
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 16.01.2014, 09:32
Beiträge: 2785
Wohnort: From MILTON via MI-5 to Castlevania
:drool: :drool: :sigh: :heartthrow: :heartthrow: wunderschöööööööööööööööööööööööööööön

war perfektes Timing für meine Ohren gestern

Danke für's Rüberholen

_________________
Bild

Bild I will be always your LucasGirl
and yes, I love Francis, Daniel & Raymond,2
Bild

FD: 'You see me now, Yes
That's how you feel to see me
Do you feel me now? Yes'


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:  Sortiere nach  
Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 13 Beiträge ] 

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Wer ist online?

0 Mitglieder


Ähnliche Beiträge

Richard und David Hewson on 'Romeo and Juliet' (16.02.2017)
Forum: Video-Interviews 2017
Autor: Nimue
Antworten: 11
The Chimes - Charles Dickens Audiobook (Dezember 2015)
Forum: Audiobooks
Autor: Oaky
Antworten: 33
Venetia-Audiobook-Interview (02.03.2010)
Forum: Audio-Interviews 2005-2011
Autor: Maike
Antworten: 24
The-Convenient-Marriage-Audiobook-Interview (06.2010)
Forum: Audio-Interviews 2005-2011
Autor: Laudine
Antworten: 0
RH-Audiobook-Interview
Forum: Audio-Interviews 2005-2011
Autor: Julie
Antworten: 63

Du darfst keine neuen Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst keine Antworten zu Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht ändern.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.

Suche nach:
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group



Bei iphpbb3.com bekommen Sie ein kostenloses Forum mit vielen tollen Extras
Forum kostenlos einrichten - Hot Topics - Tags
Beliebteste Themen: Audi, TV, Bild, Erde, NES

Impressum | Datenschutz