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BeitragVerfasst: 05.03.2019, 20:53 
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Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Der erste Artikel zu 'The Stranger' über die Dreharbeiten mit bereits bekanntem Bildmaterial:

Zitat:
New Netflix thriller The Stranger starring Richard Armitage spotted filming in Ancoats

Film crews were spotted in the Royal Mills apartment building on Jersey Street on Monday



ByVickie Scullard

17:42, 5 MAR 2019


Filming is underway for new Netflix thriller series The Stranger - and it's happening right here in Manchester.

Film crews were spotted in Ancoats' Royal Mills apartment building on Monday in the open plan foyer area which is home to Ancoats Coffee Co.

Management company CERT Property uploaded the images below to their twitter account, with the message: "Had a bit of fuss in our office building today #royalmills! @Netflix filming a new series around @AncoatsCoffeeCo."

Based on a Harlan Coben’s mystery thriller novel of the same name, the eight-part series features The Hobbit’s Richard Armitage in the lead role of Adam Price.

The new drama series reunites executive producer Nicola Shindler and Coben with lead writer and exec producer Danny Brocklehurst.

Richard said: “I could barely contain my excitement reading Harlan Coben’s The Stranger; a nail biting thriller with a huge beating heart and a dash of social commentary for extra bite.

“I’m thrilled to be returning to work with Nicola Schindler and the brilliant creative team she has assembled.”

Hyde-born screenwriter Danny has penned a number of series - many of which were filmed in or around the city - including The Driver, In The Dark and Ordinary Lies.

The Stranger will follow the success of The Five and 2018 hit Safe, which starred Dexter’s Michael C Hall.

Brocklehurst said: “It’s fantastic to reunite with Netflix, Harlan and RED for another complex, emotional thriller. Richard Armitage is perfect for the role of Adam, and I can’t wait to bring our binge-able new drama to life.”

The story follows how a secret destroys a man’s perfect life and sends him on a collision course with a deadly conspiracy.

Adam Price has a good life, two wonderful sons, and a watertight marriage — until one night a stranger sits next to him in a bar and tells him a devastating secret about his wife, Corinne.

Soon Adam finds himself tangled in something far darker than even Corinne’s deception, and realises that if he doesn’t make exactly the right moves, the conspiracy he’s stumbled into will not only ruin lives—it will end them.

Harlan said: “The Stranger was one of my most challenging novels — and definitely the most twisted. When I wrote it, I never imagined that I’d be part of a ‘Dream Team’ of extraordinary talent bringing it to life.

"I can’t wait to reunite with Danny, Nicola, and Netflix on this remarkable project.”


https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/tv/new-netflix-thriller-stranger-starring-15925880

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.03.2019, 17:07 
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Bericht mit vielen Fotos vom Dreh:

Zitat:
Jennifer Saunders transforms into adventure-seeking mother as she films first scenes in Manchester for Netflix's chilling new thriller The Stranger

By Connie Rusk For Mailonline


She has landed her first major drama role in Netflix's new psychological thriller, The Stranger.

And Jennifer Saunders transformed into Heidi- a mother with a thirst for adventure- as filming got under way in Manchester's city centre on Thursday morning.

Dressed in a denim jumpsuit and leopard print boots, the French and Saunders actress, 60, put on an animated display as she filmed her first scenes for the series.

As the scene unfolded, Jen's character looked slightly suspicious as she waited inconspicuously by a pillar, before giving her pal a warm wave.

The comedian, who also rocked a burgundy baseball jacket as part of her costume, looked relieved to see her blonde-haired friend with the pair sharing a hug.

Jennifer is staring alongside Happy Valley's Siobhan Finneran and The Hobbit’s Richard Armitage, who plays the leading role as Adam Price.

The eight-part adaptation of Harlan Coben's novel follows family man Adam, whose life comes crashing down after he discovers a shocking secret about his wife.

Siobhan, of Downton Abbey fame, will take on the role as Saunder's best friend, Detective Sergeant Johanna Griffin.

Jen, who is best known as her champagne-guzzling alter ego 'Eddie darling' in Ab Fab, will make the leap into thriller territory in her first major drama role.

The Ab Fab star's character Heidi is seeking an adventure after her daughter leaves university.

Hannah John-Kamen will play the mysterious stranger who exposes the secret to Adam, entangling him in a conspiracy.

The star-studded cast will also include Game of Thrones icon Paul Kaye, Buffy the Vampire Slayer star Anthony Head, Broadchurch's Shaun Dooley, The Crying Game’s Stephen Rea and Black Mirror actor Kadiff Kirwan.

There's no due date yet for the release of the thriller, but Netflix teased the following details: 'secrets, violence and a conspiracy send family man Adam Price on a desperate quest to uncover the truth about the people closest to him.'

While Jennifer will portray a darker character in The Stranger, Ab Fab fans will be thrilled to learn her co-star Joanna Lumley isn't done with the cult series just yet.

In an interview with The Daily Telegraph on Wednesday, the 72-year-old British actress revealed she wouldn't rule out reviving her iconic role of Patsy Stone in the hit series.

'We keep thinking it is the end but there is some weird nagging thing, particularly for Patsy and Eddie, they don't seem to have gone back into their boxes so maybe something will come up,' she revealed.


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-6782301/Jennifer-Saunders-films-scenes-Manchester-Netflixs-chilling-new-thriller-Stranger.html

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.03.2019, 19:11 
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Ein weiterer Artikel zu den Dreharbeiten mit Jennifer Saunders mit allgemeinen Informationen zu 'The Stranger':

Zitat:
Jennifer Saunders beams as she films new Netflix thriller The Stranger

Tilly Pearce
Thursday 7 Mar 2019 3:39 pm

Jennifer Saunders has got to work on her new Netflix series The Stranger and her first dramatic role looks like a laugh a minute (at least for now). The comedy legend is taking on the role of Heidi, a close friend of leading lady Johanna (Downton Abbey’s Siobhan Finneran) who crosses The Stranger in question. Richard Armitage will star alongside them, playing Adam Price, whose own run-in with the mystery woman causes his life to unravel and a conspiracy to shed light on.

Shooting scenes in Manchester City Centre early on Thursday morning, Jennifer was seen rocking some double denim and leopard print boots with an American-style letterman jacket over the top. Speaking about the role after the announcement, Jennifer said: ‘‘’m delighted to be playing Heidi in this new Harlan Coben drama. ‘There is a great cast and production team with strong credentials lined up and we are all looking forward to starting filming.’ It’s not known what will become of Heidi just yet – but we know the character is on the hunt for adventure after her daughter flies the nest and heads to university.

Question is though, has the mum got herself into more trouble than she initially let herself in for? Ant-Man and The Wasp star Hannah John-Kamen will be playing the mysterious character, who has an uncanny ability to ruin people’s lives in one easy swoop as she spills secret across the group of friends. Jennifer leads an all-star British cast for the new series, with faces from TV favourites taking on the new psychological thriller. Broadchurch’s Shaun Dooley, Game of Thrones’ Paul Kaye, Silent Witness’s Dervla Kiran, Chewing Gum’s Kadiff Kirwan, Buffy’s Anthony Head, and The Crying Game’s Stephen Rea were all announced as cast members at the same time as Jennifer.

The new eight-part show will be based on Harlan Coben’s 2015 novel of the same name. Netflix had previously recreated another of the author’s works, Safe, which was released last year and starred Michael C Hall. The Stranger will air on Netflix at a later date.


https://metro.co.uk/2019/03/07/jennifer-saunders-beams-films-new-netflix-thriller-stranger-8851744/

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BeitragVerfasst: 11.03.2019, 17:15 
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Bericht über die Dreharbeiten heute mit sechs Fotos ohne Richard (Vorsicht, nicht alle sind für zartere Gemüter geeignet, deshalb im Spoiler). ACHTUNG SPOILER im Text!!!

Zitat:
Filming for new Netflix thriller The Stranger starts at The Rock

By Brad Marshall


BURY has today transformed into the chilling set for the new Netflix thriller series The Stranger.

Cameras rolled this morning as crews were spotted filming beneath the Peel Memorial outside Bury Parish Church on The Rock.

The set was decked out like a lurid police crime scene centred around the grisly mocked-up corpse of a dog, complete with police tape, officers and a mass of fake blood ­— drawing crowds of shoppers and visitors to the town.

Last week film crews were also spotted shooting for The Stranger in Ancoats' Royal Mills apartment building, in Manchester.

Based on Harlan Coben's novel of the same name, the eight-part series stars The Hobbit's Richard Armitage in the lead role as Adam Price.

The psychological thriller follows Adam as his seemingly perfect life is turned upside down.

Blessed with two wonderful sons and a watertight marriage, one night Adam is joined at a bar by a stranger who shares a shocking secret about his wife, Corrine.

Adam is quickly consumed in a mysterious web of deception, becoming ensnared in conspiracy far more sinister than his wife's deceit, and one which could have disastrous and even life-threatening consequences.

Joining Richard in the cast is the Happy Valley and Downton Abbey star Siobhan Finneran, alongside Absolutely Fabulous's Jennifer Saunders, as well as Ant Man and The Wasp villain Hannah John-Kamen, Broadchurch's Shaun Dooley, Game of Throne's Paul Kaye, Strike Back's Dervla Kirwan, Black Mirror's Kadiff Kirwan, Buffy The Vampire Slayer's Anthony Head and Oscar-nominated actor and star of The Crying Game Stephen Rea.

The drama also reunites Coben and executive producer Nicola Shindler with writer Danny Brocklehurst.

Anthony Head said: “I am so pleased to be working with Nicola Shindler and Harlan Coben.

"They’ve both built such brilliant reputations, creating shows in which mystery runs dark and deep, while being utterly believable.

"The Stranger is just such a fantastic script – Harlan’s concept is genius.”

A release date for the series is yet to be confirmed


Spoiler: anzeigen
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https://www.burytimes.co.uk/news/17492156.filming-for-new-netflix-thriller-the-stranger-starts-at-the-rock/

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BeitragVerfasst: 14.03.2019, 16:21 
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Ein Interview mit dem Screenwriter von 'The Stranger':

Zitat:
From Tameside College to writing for Netflix - how Danny Brocklehurst conquered television

“My dad worked in a factory and my mum was a secretary, so there was never an expectation that I would go off and do anything other than a ‘normal’ job. There certainly wasn’t an expectation that I’d work in television."

ByVickie Scullard

09:56, 10 MAR 2019


Danny Brocklehurst is the first to say that to be successful, you usually need a healthy dose of luck to help you along the way.

And for Danny, that luck came in the form of an interview with Paul Abbott while freelancing at the Manchester Evening news as a journalist.

An aspiring screenwriter himself, bold Danny took a chance and convinced Paul - who was promoting Clocking Off - to pass on his scripts to Red Production Company, run by Nicola Shindler.

Danny, 47, ended up selling two stories for the second series of the BBC drama series - and this kick-started his career as an award-winning screenwriter.

“As you can imagine this was a massive thing for me, I had to do well,” said Danny.

“Up until that point I had written plays and even wrote a script for radio, but this was my first proper chance with television.

“I sent three fully formed episode ideas over and they ended up buying two of them. I was elated.

“Hats off to Nicola for being so brave in giving me a shot. I’m indebted to her for that. She was young herself when she set up Red so I think she thought, why not? People have got to start somewhere.”

Growing up in Hyde to a working class family, Danny says there was never any assumption that he would work in such a creative profession.

“My dad worked in a factory and my mum was a secretary, so there was never an expectation that I would go off and do anything other than a ‘normal’ job, he said. “There certainly wasn’t an expectation that I’d work in television.

“I left school doing just that - I worked in a shop as a storeroom manager. That was perfectly fine, I could have gone on to have a career in retail.

“But I didn't enjoy it. I always enjoyed writing, so I jacked in the job and went to college.”
Channel 4's Shameless (Image: Channel 4)

It was at Tameside College that Danny came into his own while studying A-levels in English and Communications.

"The best thing I did was pack in my job and go back to college where I had a very inspirational lecturer who helped me with my aspirations. Because I was more focused and inspired I did really well", Danny said.

“The next step was journalism, where I worked for the M.E.N. and City Life, which I loved. I continued doing freelance work while I was at university.

“I loved it but I always had this passion to get a break in television, so meeting Paul Abbott was a game changer.”

Following his success with Clocking Off, Danny went on to write for Linda Green starring Liza Tarbuck, The Stretford Wives starring Fay Ripley, and a certain Channel 4 comedy series, which won him a BAFTA TV award.

“I was lucky to work on the first series of Shameless,” said Danny. “That really was chaos.

“Even though I was hanging off Paul’s coattails a bit it was a brilliant introduction into the business, watching how he operated and trying to do scripts that came close to his standards.”

Throughout his career, Danny has continued to work alongside Red on shows including The Driver starring David Morrissey and Ordinary Lies with comic Jason Manford.

The theme that runs through his scripts is that they are always set in Manchester.

“I set everything here until I’m told not to,” he said. “Come Home was originally set in Manchester but for various reasons the BBC changed it to Northern Ireland.

“But for me, unless there’s a good reason not to, my stories will always be based here. I know the area and I love it here.”

Danny's first taste of working with Netflix was his collaboration with crime author Harlan Coben for Safe, featuring Dexter star Michael C Hall.

“Michael was a really nice man, you don’t often find that with actors," said Danny.

“I was quite nervous when I went to meet him. I was like, I’m going to meet Dexter for dinner. We took our wives and within a few minutes of him arriving it was just like speaking to normal person - he wasn’t 'Hollywoody' at all.”

Danny’s latest project with the streaming giant reunites him with Nicola Shindler and Harlan Coben for The Stranger.

The story follows how a secret destroys a man’s perfect life and sends him on a collision course with a deadly conspiracy.

Based on Coben’s mystery thriller novel of the same name, the eight-part series features The Hobbit’s Richard Armitage in the lead role of Adam Price.

Danny said: “I’m really enjoying working on this. It’s the first time that we’ve based the series on Harlan’s book.

“What’s really good about it is that although it’s a thriller, this time we wanted it to be just as much about family. So while there are big thriller moments, it’s also about a father, his kids and his wife.”

While it’s fair to say Danny, who also won an RTS award for Come Home, has become a sought-after screenwriter, he’s quite modest about his success.

When directly asked about how well he’s done, he says: “I don’t think about it too often but when you put it like that I suppose it is quite good really.

“I went back to Tameside College recently to do a talk and I think it’s doing stuff like that where you think, actually I have come quite a long way.

“There were all these wide-eyed students, just like I used to be, watching me as I spoke to them in the same hall I used to be in.

“It was quite humbling really.”


https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/tv/danny-brockleburst-tameside-college-netflix-15944345


Und hier gibt es ein Interview mit Harlan Coben, in dem 'The Stranger' und Richard kurz erwähnt werden:

Zitat:
Mike Lupica@MikeLupica

The Mike Lupica Podcast Episode 150 - Harlan Coben by Compass Media Networks on SoundCloud - Hear the world’s sounds


https://twitter.com/MikeLupica/status/1105527421720240128

https://soundcloud.com/compass-media/the-mike-lupica-podcast-episode-150-harlan-coben

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BeitragVerfasst: 15.03.2019, 16:55 
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Ausführliches Interview mit Harlan Coben in der 'Financial Times' aus Anlass des Erscheinens von 'Run Away' mit einigen Randbemerkungen zu 'The Stranger' und durchaus interessanten Informationen (14 Adaptationen bei Netflix :shock: ):

Zitat:
Harlan Coben: ‘I don’t really need a creative outlet — my job is creative’

Over a virtual round of golf with Sujeet Indap, the crime writer talks about beating deadlines, finding balance and ‘champagne problems’


It is a bright, late morning in early March and Harlan Coben greets me in the attire of a serious golfer. A logoed polo shirt is neatly tucked into his golf slacks; in his hands are a pair of white golf shoes, which he will shortly change into from the boots he has worn to travel.

Completing the look is a baseball cap, to protect his exquisitely bald head from the sun. But it’s a superfluous piece of kit today. Winter is clinging on and a series of storms has left several inches of snow on the ground. Our plans to play the Ridgewood Country Club, Coben’s home course in the well-heeled New Jersey suburbs, have been upended. We have retreated to an austere warehouse off a Jersey highway that has a series of golf simulators where players can keep their game from hibernating. The only light in here will be fluorescent; sunburn is not a hazard.

Consider the weather a plot twist. Coben is one of America’s top crime writers, with 30 books selling more than 70 million copies in total. His prolific output — typically, he turns out at least one book a year — has now led to a series on Netflix and European networks. In 2018, he entered into a multiyear deal with Netflix to adapt 14 titles; The Stranger, based on a 2015 novel, has just gone into production and stars Richard Armitage and Stephen Rea.

Coben compares his writing to a pregnancy — a chronic one, with a perennial due date in autumn. He is calm and jovial today, belying the manic push to finish writing in the second half of the year. “The last week or two is bad, in terms of I really lock myself in a room and don’t move, don’t shower, don’t shave. I grow a playoff beard. The kids throw a banana in the room, and run away, that sort of thing, especially in the last couple of days.”

He admits that such a relentless schedule leaves little time or mindspace for other interests. “I have my family and I have my writing,” he says. “And I don’t really need a creative outlet, because my job is creative. So I don’t collect comic books. I don’t play chess with masters. I don’t do any of those kinds of things, because, whenever I do those kinds of things, I’m always saying, ‘I should be writing!’”

Nevertheless, Coben decided to make an exception for golf. His social circle — centred on New York’s finance, media and arts scenes — was full of serious players and he lamented having to decline invitations for male-bonding golf excursions. “I took up golf a little more than 10 years ago now, and I found it a great way of hanging out with friends, uninterrupted, for four hours.” His golf buddies include the political journalist George Stephanopolous and the actor Michael J Fox.

Coben was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1962, and raised in nearby Livingston. His father was a lawyer and his mother worked in her father’s travel agency (where Coben too would briefly work after college). His height — 6ft 4in — helped him win a basketball scholarship to elite Amherst College in Massachusetts, where his classmates included Dan Brown, David Foster Wallace and a women’s basketball player, Anne, who would become his wife. Coben planned to be a lawyer but deferred law school to take a shot at writing. His first novel, Play Dead, came out in 1990; the advance was $5,000. It was not until his 10th book that he had a bestseller.

Our golf simulator is a mat from which we strike golf balls into a screen loaded with sensors that can detect ball speed, spin and direction (Donald Trump reportedly had one installed in the White House during the recent government shutdown, when he could not travel to his Florida club). We start out in driving-range mode, just whacking balls to loosen up. Coben’s swing is languid and powerful; he resembles the PGA Tour player Stewart Cink, the bald, lanky journeyman who won the 2009 Open Championship at Turnberry in Scotland.

Most recreational golfers and many pros have abandoned long irons, the trickiest golf clubs to wield because of their lack of forgiveness on mis-hits. Yet Coben has mastered his, carrying a two and a three iron in his bag. He plays off a respectable 13 handicap, which puts his score for 18 holes at around 90, give or take a few strokes.

Unlike most golf enthusiasts, the game does not consume him. “The problem is that I’ve been obsessed with [golf] a couple of times, and I hate that,” he says. “Life’s all about balance. So if I’m not writing well, if I’m not in a good place with my spouse, if I’m not doing well with my children, that’s when I will [try to find] balance. If one of those is not going well, the rest fall out of place. And it’s the same thing with golf. When I get too obsessed with it, I play worse and I don’t like it.”

Coben’s success in the late 1990s came from a series of novels revolving around Myron Bolitar, a sports agent turned gumshoe loosely based on Coben himself. Later, Coben began writing standalone stories that were often set in New Jersey and featured prosperous families harbouring dark secrets. His latest novel, Run Away, features characters who seem distinctly autobiographical. Simon Greene is a successful middle-aged wealth manager whose family lives adjacent to Central Park in Manhattan (Coben also owns an apartment there). Simon’s wife, Ingrid, is a paediatrician like Coben’s wife, Anne. Coben has four children in their late teens and early twenties; Simon and Ingrid have three. Coben even had his children read Run Away, asking if they could guess which of them the fictional kids were modelled on.

Coben’s storytelling largely sticks to the subculture he knows best: white, upscale suburbia, a fertile milieu for all sorts of mass-market art and literature but one perhaps lacking the richness of a more diverse world. He counters that each book ventures into a different contemporary theme. Simon’s frantic quest to find his endangered daughter in Run Away unleashes twists and turns that touch on religious cults, drug addiction and the advent of home DNA-testing kits.

“What I’ve learnt is that the more specific your writing, the more universal the appeal. If I try to make it Everytown USA, it falls apart. I’m very specific to where I’m at. But the fun part of that is, when I’m doing TV, I’ve always changed it.” He points out that the cinema adaptation of his 2001 novel Tell No One transposes the action to Paris, while the TV series of Safe and The Stranger are set in England and feature a more diverse cast. “Most people think that you should want your adaptations to be slavishly devoted to the text; I’m the opposite of that.”

Characters have changed as well as settings, he says. “I did a TV series in France called No Second Chance: the lead character was a man and we changed it to a woman. The Stranger that we’re doing now, the title character — The Stranger, the person who would drop the surprises — was a young, white, male computer geek. Now it’s a mixed-race young woman. And I love that change. If I was writing the book today, I probably would make that change.”

By now we have switched the simulator to golf-course mode, where we can select any number of famed tracks to play a virtual round. Even just a decade on from picking up the game, Coben has already played many of the storied courses on offer, such as Pine Valley and Pebble Beach, so we choose a mountain course in Canada neither of us has heard of. I’ve only brought three of my own golf clubs with me from Manhattan while Coben has his full set, so he is poised to beat me in our friendly match.

If I’m not writing well, if I’m not in a good place with my spouse . . . that’s when I will [try to find] balance

I ask whether we are living in a golden age of mystery, with the advent of Netflix, true-crime podcasts such as Serial and even old-fashioned page-turners of the sort Coben produces. “I think for over 20 years, we’ve had our moment,” he says. “I think the thing is that it’s never been better. There’s never been more people writing it and writing it well. And if you think of all the great novels you’ve read that have survived the past 100 years or more — Dostoyevsky, Wilde, whatever — they all have a crime in them of some sort. There’s also so many great writers from all over the world . . . Men, women, black, white, every sort of religion, and I think that’s really making it [the mystery genre] much richer.”

Coben’s television work has given him a vast audience globally and a new format for storytelling. Does he prefer the screen? “It’s a good day to ask, because we started filming The Stranger with Netflix, based off my book, today in Manchester, England,” he replies, deftly doing his bit for the publicity machine.

“The main difference is the obvious one, and that is when I’m alone and when I’m collaborating with people. If you win a golf championship, you stand there alone and collect that trophy, which is great, but it’s also lonely. So if I’m on the bestseller list, I celebrate the book alone. With the TV shows, I feel like I’m captain of a team. Like a soccer team, I want everybody to score, I want everybody to do really well, and I want to celebrate it with this whole team.”

We conclude our “round” after nine holes. Neither of is a particularly sharp simulator golfer but Coben edges me by a few strokes on the strength of his virtual short game.

In his late fifties, he seems a man in full: his writing and TV career have brought him fame and fortune; he has a happy family life; even his golf game does not trouble him too much. There is, for many commercially successful writers, a nagging insecurity about their place in the literary hierarchy. Critics have little time for the yarns that dominate airport bookshops. Coben is over it.

“I don’t really think about it any more, I really don’t. It doesn’t make much of a difference to me. I also get plenty of acclaim. I’ve been reviewed in The New York Times positively. I’ve done op eds for The New York Times and Bloomberg, and any publication that I want to do. I’ve won more than my share of awards. Champagne problems; you can’t have everything in life.

“Every writer I’ve ever met wishes they were reviewed better and sold more books. It doesn’t matter if you’re the most commercial writer in the world, or if you are the most esoteric writer. Every writer, unless they’re lying to you, wants more critical acclaim and wants to sell more books.” Golf and writing each have a way of fuelling men’s neuroses; Coben, however, happily takes them in his stride.

Sujeet Indap is US editor of the FT’s Lex Column. ‘Run Away’ by Harlan Coben is published in the US by Grand Central on March 19, $29, and in the UK by Century on March 21, £20


https://www.ft.com/content/d00458bc-4522-11e9-b168-96a37d002cd3

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BeitragVerfasst: 22.03.2019, 11:06 
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Ein weiteres Interview mit Harlan Coben als Podcast:

Zitat:
The B&N Podcast: Taking the Plunge with Harlan Coben

Posted by The Barnes and Noble Review /
March 20, 2019


Every author has a story beyond the one that they put down on paper. The Barnes & Noble Podcast goes between the lines with today’s most interesting writers, exploring what inspires them, what confounds them, and what they were thinking when they wrote the books we’re talking about.

If the bestselling, award-winning novelist Harlan Coben has a secret to enthralling readers, it’s that his characters aren’t, for the most part globetrotting spies, cops on the edge, elite special forces agents or heroic defense attorneys. Coben creates suspense by putting ordinary people into extraordinary circumstances, situations which take them with appalling and gripping velocity straight from the office, the coffee shop or the classroom into nail-biting, plot-twisting territory. His latest, Run Away, opens with a simple concept: a man in Manhattan’s Central Park looks across a clearing a spies, to his astonishment, the daughter who ran away from home. This being Coben, what follows feels both inevitable and absolutely unpredictable. The New Jersey based novelist joined us in the studio to talk about why he prefers to think of his novels not in terms of a genre, but an immersive journey he wants readers to experience.

A perfect family is shattered in RUN AWAY, the new thriller from the master of domestic suspense, Harlan Coben.

You’ve lost your daughter.

She’s addicted to drugs and to an abusive boyfriend. And she’s made it clear that she doesn’t want to be found.

Then, by chance, you see her playing guitar in Central Park. But she’s not the girl you remember. This woman is living on the edge, frightened, and clearly in trouble.

You don’t stop to think. You approach her, beg her to come home.

She runs.

And you do the only thing a parent can do: you follow her into a dark and dangerous world you never knew existed. Before you know it, both your family and your life are on the line. And in order to protect your daughter from the evils of that world, you must face them head on.

This special signed B&N edition contains an interview with Harlan Coben.

Explore all of Harlan Coben’s books.

Like this podcast? Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher to discover intriguing new conversations every week.


https://www.barnesandnoble.com/review/harlan-coben-podcast?spklr=2201063430%7C138%7CPodcast%7C12438%7CBNBuzz%7CTWITTER%7C2201063434

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Neues über die Dreharbeiten:

Zitat:
Is science fiction the cause of mysterious lights seen at night in Delamere Forest?


PEOPLE living in and around Delamere Forest have been puzzled by the appearance of strange, eerie lights among the trees.

They could be forgiven for think that the forest was the sight of a UFO encounter - and they would not be far wrong.

The forest is increasingly being used as a location for films and television - including a BBC adaptation of War of the Worlds and a new Netflix series called The Stranger.

The dense forest has recently been used as a backdrop for dramatic scenes of an alien invasion for the latest adaptation of H G Wells classic War of the Worlds.

The Peter Harness' three-part adaptation the sci-fi classic will be screened on BBC One later this year.

And more recently, a car chase was filmed for The Stranger, a series due to be shown on Netflix later this year starring Hannibal and The Hobbit actor Richard Armitage.

Few details are available about the eight-episode series, based on Harlan Coben’s novel, but the synopsis from Netflix reads: “ A secret destroys a man’s perfect life and sends him on a collision course with a deadly conspiracy in this shocking thriller.

“Adam Price has a good life, two wonderful sons, and a watertight marriage - until one night a stranger sits next to him in a bar and tells him a devastating secret about his wife, Corinne.

“Soon Adam finds himself tangled in something far darker than even Corinne’s deception, and realises that if he doesn’t make exactly the right moves, the conspiracy he’s stumbled into will not only ruin lives — it will end them.”

One resident of Station Road said weird sightings were becoming more common in the forest.

He said: There's a weird chunky looking prop with bright lights attached to it, suspended from a really high crane arm, above white gate car park and its mega bright. It lit up my house through the windows yesterday. I've not heard any noises or anything though."

The lights certainly piqued residents' curiosity.

Posting in the Delamere and Oakmere Facebook group, Jacqui Brooks asked: "What are the giant lights on the skyline over far side of the forest for?"

Sarah Evans said: "We have wondered every morning/evening...query aliens abduction of locals, building, concerts..can tell kids the truth now?"

Ellen Piercy replied: "Nah, stick with the aliens story, MUCH more exciting."

Others described the filming as "exciting" and "very, very bright".

The forest has become popular with television and film producers, with episodes of ITV drama Cold Feet filmed there recently.

Residents have been told filming is permitted until 1am.


https://www.chesterstandard.co.uk/news/17517474.is-science-fiction-the-cause-of-mysterious-lights-seen-at-night-in-delamere-forest/

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Ein weiteres Interview mit Harlan Coben:

Zitat:
Salon@Salon

Harlan Coben on why even bestselling authors get those self-loathing writer blues


https://twitter.com/Salon/status/1110277491506249728


Zitat:
Harlan Coben on why even bestselling authors get those self-loathing writer blues
Salon talks to the prolific novelist about why he likes writing about missing people and the specific appeal of NJ


Mary Elizabeth Williams
March 25, 2019 8:00PM (UTC)

What happens after you've seen 70 million copies of your books go to print, been translated to 43 languages and had your works adapted into film and television productions around the world? If you're Harlan Coben, you keep waking up in the morning and wondering how to keep doing it. The author of the new novel "Run Away," about a father searching for his daughter caught up in a world of intrigue and murder, talked with Salon recently about self loathing, why he loves stories of missing persons and how New Jersey made him who he is.

People wonder where novelists get their inspiration, especially you. You've written 31 novels. The opening of the book is a moment that actually happened to you.

I had a bunch of great ideas; I just couldn't think of a way into the story. One day I'm sitting in Central Park in Strawberry Fields. The John Lennon mosaic is there and there's always a street musician mangling Beatles tunes. Absolutely horrible. I'm sitting there and I'm looking across at the guy and I thought, "What if that was my lead character's daughter? What if she was strung out and he hadn't seen her in six months and he finally found her? And if I open the book, that when he tries to rescue her, everything goes wrong?" That's the opening paragraph of "Run Away."

And of course one of the first things that happens is what happens when you have a confrontation in public: You go viral.

Everybody videos it. My lead character's a Wall Street guy. He's wearing a suit and the guy he fights with looks homeless. When people film it, even though it's not his fault, it's [framed as] "Wall Street Exec Beats Up Homeless Guy," "Rich Guy Beats Up Poor Guy." That is exactly how I think those things go viral, when we don't really know all the facts.

One of my favorite lines in the whole book is "Don't read the comments." It's one of the best pieces of advice. Do you do that? Do you read the comments?

I do not anymore. I don't read reviews. I don't read the comments. I'm actually really happy that I get enough Amazon reviews, so I don't look at them anymore. I get the desire. When I started out, Amazon wasn't really around, so I didn't know how badly I was doing or my rankings or any of that. Now there are too many things to follow online. It's a bad thing. You should just write your book.

You are a hugely successful, prolific author. You are coming up on 30 years of being a published author. Yet you did not have a bestseller right out of the gate. You were not an overnight success.

My first Myron Bolitar book, I made a $5,000 advance. I don't want to brag, but the fourth Myron Bolitar book I was making $6,000.

It was my tenth book, "Tell No One," that changed my life overnight. Not to sound like an old man, but that was really good for me in hindsight. I have such an appreciation for what I have now and what it took to get there. And you also can really work on your craft. So, it's OK. Just relax and enjoy the ride.

You worked for this. This was a job, and it did not come overnight. You got your first book deal when you were what 26, but it's not like you were then an enfant terrible.

I was hardly an overnight sensation, but I wouldn't change anything. Those lean years really make these years that much better.

Let's talk about the characters in this book. It feels like this is a moment where a lost woman is a presence in literature now, whether it's in a book like "Where'd You Go, Bernadette?" or in "Gone Girl." There is this figure of the enigmatic, elusive female who had disappeared. Do you feel like that is saying something about where we are right now?

Well, I've been doing it since 1995. I had a woman disappear in my first book. I'm big on disappearance. I don't write murder mysteries, despite whatever my reputation is. When someone disappears, there's hope. You can really have full redemption. You can find them. You could be made whole. If somebody is dead or murdered, that's it. You can solve the crime, you can get justice, but you can never have that. Hope is a wonderful thing to write about. Hope can fill your heart with love or it can crush your heart like it's an eggshell. That's why I love to do it. If somebody's dead, OK. But if somebody maybe can be found, maybe can be rescued, then we really have full redemption. That's an intriguing thing for me.

It's obviously very intriguing to us as readers. And this book, you will be guessing until the last page.

I knew from the very beginning. I start with the beginning and the end. Up to that last paragraph, I wasn't exactly sure how I would pull that last trigger, but I knew it right when I started the whole book that I was going to go there.

You're not going to figure it out. But you know what's good? When it is revealed, it is satisfying. Sometimes you read something and the author didn't set it up along the way. Then there's a final reveal and it just feels like, "OK. Well, I couldn't have seen that." But with this, you get to that endpoint and it's, "You were leading me here all along."

All the clues are there. It was interesting when I did TV for Netflix, "The Five" and "Safe," I could do something I can't do in books. After we give away the ending, the twist, I then went back in those last episodes and I would show you what you had seen before from a slightly different perspective. In "Safe" and "The Five," we show you and you go, "Oh, right. It was right there." I love that feeling.

Especially the ending of "Run Away," I really wanted to be a little more haunting and lingering. I want you to ask yourself a few questions. You want to call your best friend to talk about it. I don't want to say it's dark or light, but it's gray. And I really enjoyed that where it's not just a gasp, but hopefully it's a gasp that'll make you think.

One of the elements in this book is also DNA testing. You actually did it.

The whole world is doing it. So I did one of those genealogy tests, because I wanted to do research on it. When I got the test back, I said, "Wow. You have a first cousin." I was so excited. I looked and it was my first cousin, so it really wasn't so exciting. I had nothing in my past. I was very, very boring.

For a novelist, the modern world, all this stuff is so cool. "Run Away'" is a contemporary novel. It's taking place now. There are viral videos. There's genealogy DNA. There's some of the new cult stuff that we've been dealing with. Adoption scams. College, even. I don't write about the past. I hope people will find things in it that relates to their lives.

You very much have always based a lot of your characters and situations and even canines in your books on characters in your real life.

Yet when you do these adaptations, especially internationally, you are not precious about keeping faithful to the book. You really like changing them. What happens in that translation from the page to a screen that then opens it up to different characterization, different countries, different situations?


If I ask you to name your favorite adaptations, my guess is they're not ones that kept slavishly devoted to the text. I think of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," "L.A. Confidential," even "Godfather." They're two different mediums. One's visual and one can be inside the head.

The second thing is, I don't want to repeat myself. Why would I want to tell you the same exact story? Just read the book.

"The Stranger," which we're now filming in England, when I wrote it several years ago, the stranger was a white male computer nerd. Now it is a female person of color, young, and she's great. Hannah John-Kamen is going to absolutely destroy the role and just adds a new dimension.

Sometimes, also, you're working with other people. In the case of "Tell No One," moving this story from New Jersey to France gave the characters a new and different heart. Not to say I won't do [adaptations] that are right here and right where I am, but it's been really fun to work with people who really see the book very differently than I do.

It's been almost a year since the announcement of your deal with Netflix. Fourteen productions. You must be thinking now of "Run Away." Is it going to be a film or a series?

Probably an eight-part series. That seems to be what I like doing and what they like doing for me. We're doing one on Netflix Spain. One Netflix France. One Netflix Poland. And that's great. The wonderful thing about Netflix for people is they can now see the international world has wonderful television. The one I'm working on mostly right now is "The Stranger," which is filming in Manchester, England. I'm so excited for it. Every morning I watch the rushes.

As an athlete, you make the sports analogy of how writing alone is like playing a game of golf, but this is a team sport.
I'm a socially adept introvert. Here we're talking. We're fine. We're OK. I can do that for a while, but then I have to go in a room and be alone. This is my 31st book, and it's a long time sitting in rooms alone. To get out and meet people and hang with the cast and crew, like I was just over in England doing, that's so energetic. That's so much fun. Then all of a sudden after about two or three days, I'm like, "I have to get back in my room alone."

I'm not slowing down my pace in terms of writing novels by doing the TV. If anything it's energizing me. It's making me have the appreciation to go back into that room and be alone.

People think that the life of a best selling author is pretty glamorous. You write in a Starbucks or a deli or an Uber — all the most elite hotspots. And then you go into caveman mode when it's getting close to deadline.

It's not pretty. You don't want to be around me. My kids are like, "Throw daddy a banana and run."

If you ask ten writers how they do it, you'll get eleven different answers. But it breaks down to this: Does it make me write? Do it. Does it not make me write? Don't do it. In my case, being in the same room all the time does not make me write. I use up a place. I'll go to a coffee shop and I'll work pretty well there, and then after a few weeks, I won't work so well there. So, I'll move over there. Anything that works, I do it. It's like riding a horse until that horse collapses, and then I find another horse. Don't worry how good or bad it is yet, turn that voice off. Anything that makes you write and produce pages, do, and then you'll rewrite. That's really one of the main keys that people don't get. We all get paralyzed. I still get paralyzed every day when I write. You have to fight through that paralysis.

And you say, "This is work. This is a job. I don't have fans. I have readers." You just approach it in a very serious, thoughtful way that is about doing a job. As opposed to creating magic.

You never hear anyone who is producing or doing a lot of work say that. I remember reading a Philip Roth novel. He had a quote, and I don't remember where he got the quote from, but it was, "Amateurs wait for inspiration to arrive. The rest of us just get to work." That was his attitude as well and that just has to be. It may be an art, but you have to treat it like a job. The plumber can't say, "Today I'm too important to do pipes. I just can't do pipes today."

A lot of writing is a lot of self-hatred. There's a lot of self-flagellation. A lot of days I don't like myself so much. I don't feel good about myself unless I'm producing something. Most writers don't. I let myself feel that. I get mad at myself. I've written 31 novels, so, you'd think I'd be past that. No. Every book is the same. I'm insecure. I'll be sitting there and I'll be writing it going, "Oh, my God. This book stinks. I was so good before." And five minutes later, "This book is genius. No one will ever read it because they'll read that crappy book that's already out and never give this work of Shakespearian proportions a chance." That goes on every day in my head. If you don't have that, if you think most successful or best-selling writers don't have that, you're pretty wrong. You have to have that.

You have an insecurity, thinking you stink. At the same time I'm going to say, "Please stick with me while I talk to you for 400 pages straight. I have that much genius to give you." There's a hubris and an insecurity that certainly is a contradiction, a paradox, but that's how it is.

You have said that your upbringing and being born in Newark have been part of your inspiration. What is it about our special little place in the world and some of the weirdness that you've seen in your life that comes through in these little twists and turns in your work?

I think we're little and dense. I think we're angry. We're looked down upon by New York and Philadelphia, and yet we're better than both of them.

We also stick our Turnpike in the absolute worst area. It's like driving through the beginning scene of the "Terminator" movie. But we do that so you can't see the great beauty, past it, of the Garden State. It's just everything about us is kind of a chip on your shoulder. A little bit of anger. A little bit of attitude.

The more specific you are to that New Jersey experience, the more universal the appeal. I make it Every Town U.S.A., it's not going to work.

You have to be very careful about not trying to please everybody. Just give me people who don't like it and that's good. When people get angry about a bad review. I say, "You know who never gets a bad review? Authors who aren't read. They never get bad reviews."


https://www.salon.com/2019/03/25/harlan-coben-on-why-even-bestselling-authors-get-those-self-loathing-writer-blues/

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Kurzerwähnung von 'The Stranger' in einem weiteren Interview mit dem Autor:

Zitat:
Book Smart
Best-selling author Harlan Coben’s phenomenal success, his creative process, and the characters he’s created will be at the forefront of his Rancho Mirage Writers Series discussion.


GREG ARCHER March 31, 2019 Arts & Entertainment, Current Digital


What do you do if you are a No. 1 New York Times best-selling author of 30 novels and 70 million of them are in print?

Keep writing.

That’s what Harlan Coben has been doing. The prolific author of successful suspense thrillers such as The Stranger, Fool Me Once, Don’t Let Go, and Run Away, which was released in March, takes the spotlight at the Rancho Mirage Writers Series on April 10 at the Rancho Mirage Library & Observatory. The first 600 people at the event, a mix of discussion and Q&A, will receive a free copy of Run Away.

One burning question: How the author has adjusted from being binge-read to binged-watched?

Thanks to the success of Coben’s Netflix Original drama series Harlan Coben’s Safe with Dexter alum Michael C. Hall at the helm, the author signed a multi-year deal with Netflix to develop and executive produce 14 projects for the streaming service. The first of those projects is Harlan Coben’s The Stranger starring Richard Armitage, Steven Rea, and Jennifer Saunders.

As for Run Away, the book chronicles a father searching for his missing daughter. Will Simon, the book’s protagonist, be able to maneuver through the shocking and dangerous new world in which he suddenly finds himself? That question keeps readers invested until the very last page of the suspense thriller.

What inspired Run Away?

I wanted to write about the new genealogy and DNA sites that people seem to be fascinated by. I also wanted write a book on the occult. One day, I was sitting on a bench in Central Park, and a vagrant is mangling John Lennon’s songs for a dollar. I thought, “What if my lead character looked over and saw the vagrant, and it was his daughter who had been missing?” That was the start.

Is writing easy for you?


No. It’s not easy for anybody who is doing it right. I had a conversation recently with Stephen King and he said he still worries about how his book is going to be perceived and has all the same angst we all do. We’re an interesting mix, being writers, of being super insecure while at the same time having the hubris to say, “Oh, you are going to read what I am going to write, and why don’t you pay me for the pleasure of it.”

So, how do you balance success and discipline?

For me, I have four kids. I live in the suburbs. My life is extraordinarily “normal.” Gustave Flaubert has a quote that is, something to the effect, “Be regular and orderly and normal in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.” That’s what I go by.

Are you surprised by the success of some books heading to Netflix, like The Stranger and Safe?

I’m always surprised by the success. I was asked by a French interviewer recently, “Your book is No. 1 in France, was that that one of your goals?” I thought, “Dude, that is so far past anything I was thinking of.” I am the most immodest person. I’m always surprised. I work really hard. Run Away is not a book right now. It’s not a book until you read it. A writer without a reader is like a man who claps with one hand. The reader is the other hand. It’s like playing catch and throwing the ball and nobody’s catching it. That’s not catch. The exciting part is when the characters come to life for the readers.

When did you know that this was your path?

It just became the only thing I could do. Part of being a writer is the obvious —having the inspiration and perspiration and doing the work. The other part, which is key, is desperation. [Laughs]. I’m not really fit to do anything else. Maybe you aren’t either.

I get it.


I can’t hold a real job. I’m disorganized. I’m forgetful. I’m not the brightest bulb. I’m not good at anything else. The only thing I’m good at is this. So that fear … if I didn’t have to do this, that I would have to get a “real” job, has always brought me back to my writing desk.

What do you love most about creating and writing?

Finishing. [Laughs]. Dorothy Parker gets the most credit for this quote: “I don’t like writing. I like having written.” It’s a really interesting question: Is it the process or the creation that we like? I start, as I get older, to side on the creation part. Yeah, I do like it when I’m lost in the process of writing but at the end of the day, if I don’t have anything to show for it, did I really enjoy it? I don’t think so.

What do you feel people resonate with in your books?

From what I’ve been told, Run Away is the most haunting, but I try to write the kind of book that you take on vacation to a place like Palm Springs, but you don’t want to leave your hotel … because you’d rather be with the characters in the book because they consume you.


https://www.palmspringslife.com/harlan-coben-rancho-mirage/

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Eine etwas andere Art der 'Stranger'-PR: :lol:

Zitat:
WHAT BOOK would thriller writer Harlan Coben take to a desert island?

By Daily Mail Reporter

Published: 22:29 BST, 4 April 2019 | Updated: 22:29 BST, 4 April 2019



...are you reading now?


The Witch Elm by the Irish crime writer Tana French — lyrical, suspenseful, unpredictable.

... would you take to a desert island?

I never re-read books so I’d bring something new that’s really long. Any suggestions?
WHAT BOOK would thriller writer Harlan Coben take to a desert island?

... gave you the reading bug?

What didn’t? My first book about strange disappearances, Are You My Mother? by P. D. Eastman; then Charlie And The Chocolate Factory; the Narnia Series; A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L’Engle. That takes us up to age 11. If you get the bug by that stage, it doesn’t go away.

... left you cold?

The Hobbit. This is totally my fault, not Tolkien’s. Please don’t tell anyone, okay? Especially Richard Armitage, who starred as Thorin in the movie version and is now filming the Netflix adaptation of my novel The Stranger. (See what I did here?)


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/books/article-6888249/WHAT-BOOK-thriller-writer-Harlan-Coben-desert-island.html

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BeitragVerfasst: 12.04.2019, 09:48 
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Kurzer Bericht über die Serie aus Anlass von Dreharbeiten in Bolton. Es gibt keine Spoiler dahingehend, was mit wem gedreht wurde (auch wenn man darüber spekulieren kann, dass Siobhan Finneran am Set war, weil sie im Mittelpunkt des Artikels steht), und kein wirklich aufregendes Bildmaterial: ;)


Zitat:
Upcoming Netflix series The Stranger filming in Bolton
By Tom Molloy @TOMolloy Reporter


BOLTON is being used as the set of an upcoming Netflix series.

Film crews and production trucks have been parked on the site of the former Moor Lane Bus Station this week.


The Bolton News can reveal that the filming is for upcoming thriller series - The Stranger.

Downton Abbey and Happy Valley actress Siobhan Finneran will take the leading role of DS Johanna Griffin in the eight-part series, which is based on the bestselling Harlan Coben novel of the same name.

It will reunite Ms Finneran with Red Production Company, who she worked with on Happy Valley.

The series will also star Jennifer Saunders in her first major dramatic role, Ant Man and the Wasp villain Hannah John-Kamen, Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s Anthony Head and Oscar-nominated actor Stephen Rea.

Richard Armitage plays Adam Price, the series’ protagonist who finds himself tangled in a mysterious web of deception.

His steady life, two wonderful sons and watertight marriage all seem unassailable – until The Stranger reveals a shocking secret about his wife.

Siobhan Finneran’s punchy police detective, Johanna Griffin, finds her pragmatic approach to police work compromised when her investigation into the matter becomes deeply personal.

Ms Finneran said: “I am thrilled to be working with RED again - it’s been a brilliant 20-year relationship and I feel very lucky and blessed to have that with them. After the success and utter joy of working on Happy Valley with them, it’s great to now be involved in such a new and exciting project.”

Last month, camera crews for the show were also spotted in Manchester and Bury - filming beneath the Peel Memorial outside Bury Parish Church on The Rock.

The set was decked out like a lurid police crime scene centred around the grisly mocked-up corpse of an animal, complete with police tape, officers and a mass of fake blood.

A release date for the series is yet to be confirmed.


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https://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/17568191.upcoming-netflix-series-the-stranger-filming-in-bolton/

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Und noch einmal die 'Bolton News' zum Dreh in der Bolton School:

Zitat:
21st April
Filmmakers and television producers flock to Bolton School

By Saiqa Chaudhari

IT'S not difficult to see why Bolton School often lands a starring role in leading film and television productions.

The grand facade is a spectacular local landmark and is proving to be perfect location and backdrop­— with filming have taken place at the Chorley New Road school recently.

And the money made out of the "school set" goes to fund places for bright children who may otherwise may not be able to benefit from the outstanding education provided.

Adele Hughes, who coordinates the hiring out of school premises, said: “We do seem to be on a good streak at the moment. The word about Bolton School being a great location for filming seems to have filtered out to various film companies and their location managers. This week we have just filmed some scenes for a new Netflix series called The Stranger with Richard Armitage and for a forthcoming Channel 4/Netflix comedy. We are also involved in some exciting negotiations over hiring out the premises this summer.

“We are lucky to have such spectacular buildings and visitors often say how it feels like they are on the set of Hogwarts. In fact, thinking about it, the school was even transformed into Hogwarts for an episode of Don’t Tell the Bride! All the money that we make – along with revenues from hiring out our premises and services for weddings – is ploughed back into the School’s bursary fund which enables many pupils to study for free here.”

The school's credits include a recent Last Tango in Halifax as the school where Sarah Lancashire is headmistress, he school of choice for James Nesbitt’s son in Cold Feet, a series co-produced by former pupil Deanne Cunningham.

In recent years, the school has also featured in Bancroft, Our Girl with Michelle Keegan, in CBBC’s Creeped Out, in a Gambleaware advertisement and in the film Mark of Cain; previous to that it was used in Hetty Wainthropp Investigates. And it has recently been featured in Scottish Widows advertisement.

Location shoots have so far taken place in the Great Halls, heads’ studies, on the sports fields, on the corridors, in the classrooms and laboratories, in the Arts Centre, in the Oxbridge-like quadrangles, on the headmaster’s lawn, in the sports Hall, the sixth form centre and on the memorial staircase.

And the school itself has produced a good number of well-known actors and tv personalities including Sir Ian McKellen, Mark Radcliffe, Carol Klein and Ralf Little.


https://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/17586041.filmmakers-and-television-producers-flock-to-bolton-school/

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BeitragVerfasst: 26.04.2019, 11:48 
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Erneut gibt es Informationen über ein Set von 'The Bolton News' - mit Fotos (nur Technisches, nichts Personelles):

Zitat:
Major new Netflix drama series, The Stranger, filming in Bolton today

By Neil Brandwood


BOLTON celebrity spotters are in luck today as filming begins in the town for a major new Netflix series.

Downton Abbey's Siobhan Finneran, The Hobbit's Richard Armitage, Jennifer Saunders and Oscar-nominated Stephen Rea may all be seen in Le Mans Crescent, which is being used for scenes in the Harlan Coben thriller series, The Stranger.

Yesterday the film crew was setting things up in preparation for filming, which begins today and will continue into next week.

A technician told the Bolton News: "We've installed black-out blinds in the building because it's going to be a police station and some of the scenes need to look like it's night time."

Along with equipment vans, platform film cranes were parked-up, suggesting there could be some exterior shots of the council officers and former magistrate's court.

The eight-part series is being made by the award-winning Red production company, owned by former Bury Grammar School pupil Nicola Shindler. She is also the series' executive producer.

Danny Brocklehurst, who has written the adaptation of Coben’s novel, told the Radio Times: "It’s fantastic to reunite with Netflix, Harlan and RED for another complex, emotional thriller. Richard Armitage is perfect for the role of Adam, and I can’t wait to bring our binge-able new drama to life.”

The Red website says of the series: " A secret destroys a man’s perfect life and sends him on a collision course with a deadly conspiracy in this shocking thriller.

"Adam Price [Arimtage] has a good life, two wonderful sons, and a watertight marriage — until one night a stranger sits next to him in a bar and tells him a devastating secret about his wife, Corinne [Dervla Kirwan].

"Soon Adam finds himself tangled in something far darker than even Corinne’s deception, and realises that if he doesn’t make exactly the right moves, the conspiracy he’s stumbled into will not only ruin lives—it will end them."

Bolton is fast becoming a "Hollywood of the North" as the first-choice location for film-makers. So far this year the BBC has filmed scenes for its new series Years and Years and Sky TV were here to film its new political thriller, Cobra.

Parking spaces in Le Mans Crescent between Howell Croft North to University House will be suspended from 7.30am to 7pm today.


https://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/17597689.major-new-netfliix-drama-series-the-stranger-filming-in-bolton-today/

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BeitragVerfasst: 15.05.2019, 22:06 
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Ein weiterer Artikel aus Manchester. Die Fotos zeigen alle Siobhan Finneran:

Zitat:
Filming for new Netflix thriller The Stranger starts in Victoria Square

By Brad Marshall


SOMETHING strange landed in the town centre this week as cameras rolled into Victoria Square for a new Netflix thriller series.

Entitled The Stranger, the show is the latest TV series and film production to lend Bolton a starring role, following in the footsteps of an ever increasing number of broadcasters and streaming sites utilising the town’s stunning architecture and natural beauty spots.

Films crews on The Stranger have been shooting in locations around Bolton for several weeks now, including in Le Mans Crescent and at the council offices and former magistrate’s court.

On Monday several of the show’s biggest stars were spied on Victoria Square, including Siobhan Finneran who has previously appeared in Happy Valley and Downton Abbey.

Earlier this year film crews were also spotted shooting for The Stranger in Bury — decking the set like a lurid police crime scene centred around the grisly mocked-up corpse of an animal — and at Ancoats’ Royal Mills apartment building, in Manchester.

Based on Harlan Coben’s novel of the same name, the eight-part series stars The Hobbit’s Richard Armitage in the lead role as Adam Price.

The psychological thriller follows Adam as his seemingly perfect life is turned upside down.

Blessed with two wonderful sons and a watertight marriage, one night Adam is joined at a bar by a stranger who shares a shocking secret about his wife, Corrine.

Adam is quickly consumed in a mysterious web of deception, becoming ensnared in conspiracy far more sinister than his wife’s deceit, and one which could have disastrous and even life-threatening consequences.

Joining Richard in the cast is Absolutely Fabulous’s Jennifer Saunders, as well as Ant Man and The Wasp villain Hannah John-Kamen, Broadchurch’s Shaun Dooley, Game of Throne’s Paul Kaye, Strike Back’s Dervla Kirwan, Black Mirror’s Kadiff Kirwan, Buffy The Vampire Slayer’s Anthony Head and Oscar-nominated actor and star of The Crying Game Stephen Rea.

The drama also reunites Coben and executive producer Nicola Shindler with writer Danny Brocklehurst.

Anthony Head said: “I am so pleased to be working with Nicola Shindler and Harlan Coben.

“They’ve both built such brilliant reputations, creating shows in which mystery runs dark and deep, while being utterly believable.
“The Stranger is just such a fantastic script – Harlan’s concept is genius.”
A release date for the series is yet to be confirmed.


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https://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/17640924.filming-for-new-netflix-thriller-the-stranger-starts-in-victoria-square/?ref=rss

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