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BeitragVerfasst: 21.08.2019, 11:39 
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Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
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Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Hah, endlich mal neue Szenenfotos aus 'The Lodge'. :daumen: Wäre denn jemand in der Nähe, der mit mir ins Kino ginge??? Ich weiß noch nicht, ob ich mich allein traue. ;)

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Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


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BeitragVerfasst: 21.08.2019, 23:32 
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Registriert: 29.03.2012, 22:46
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Laudine hat geschrieben:
Hah, endlich mal neue Szenenfotos aus 'The Lodge'. :daumen: Wäre denn jemand in der Nähe, der mit mir ins Kino ginge??? Ich weiß noch nicht, ob ich mich allein traue. ;)


Ich fürchte, ich bin bei den Terminen raus... und kann höchstens hoffen, dass der Film es doch noch in ein Programmkino um die Ecke schafft. Allerdings bräuchte ich wohl auch "Geleitschutz".

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.09.2019, 00:21 
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Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
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Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28864
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Ich konnte am vergangenen Dienstag nicht ins Kino gehen, so dass ich mich mit der Frage, ob ich diesen Film allein aushalte oder nicht, nicht weiter auseinandersetzen musste. Auch wenn noch kein Termin für den regulären Kinostart feststeht, gehe ich davon aus, dass das nicht die einzige Chance war, den Film zu sehen, zumal er es allüberall auf Empfehlungslisten schafft:

Zitat:
2019 Christmas movies: the trailers are starting to drop


Christmas may feel like a million miles away, but December 25 is just four month away today. So it makes perfect sense that the trailers for 2019's line-up of festive flicks have started to drop.

Here, we have gathered all of the trailers for the films you have to look forward to later later this year ...

'Noelle'

Starring: Anna Kendrick, Bill Hader, Billy Eichner, Shirley MacLaine

Expected release: Tuesday, November 12

Noelle Kringle (Kendrick) is the daughter of Kris Kringle, Santa Claus, who seems to have passed on, leaving the family business of delivering gifts to children each Christmas to his son, Nick (Hader). He isn't sure he is up to the task, however, and Noelle sets to trying to train him up, before he takes a badly timed holiday in the real world just days before December 25. Cue Noelle stepping in to save Christmas. It looks set to have plenty of laughs and heart-warming moments, in true Disney style.

'Lady and the Tramp'

Starring: Tessa Thompson, Justin Theroux, Sam Elliott

Expected release: Tuesday, November 12

OK, so Lady and the Tramp is not entirely a Christmas film, but it does begin during the festive season, when Lady (Thompson), our American cocker spaniel heroine, is given to Darling Dear as a lovely Christmas gift. And although we all know that a dog is for life, not just for Christmas, it starts the flick with a thoroughly festive feel. We defy you not to feel warm and fuzzy as Lady and Tramp (Theroux), her rough-and-ready schnauzer mix canine beau, take on the big, bad world together. The film is set to be released on Tuesday, November 12 exclusively on Disney+, ready to be played and replayed all winter long.
'The Lodge'

Starring: Riley Keough, Richard Armitage, Jaeden Martell, Lia McHugh

Expected release: Friday, November 15

A Christmas horror movie about a family who visits their remote lodge for the holidays. The father (Armitage) finds that he has to go away for a few days, leaving future-step-mum, Grace (Keough) with his two children who aren't too sure about their father's wife-to-be. Naturally, as relations start to thaw, frightening events start to occur at the snowed-in lodge.

'Frozen II'


Starring: Jonathan Groff, Kristen Bell, Evan Rachel Wood, Idina Menzel

Expected release: Thursday, November 21

Anna (Bell), Elsa (Menzel), Kristoff (Groff), Olaf (Josh Gad) and Sven are back, just in time for Christmas to ensure that every under-six-year-old in your life wants a new batch of Frozen merch in their stockings this year. Moving through the seasons, this time around we have a more autumnal feel, and the gang leaves Arendelle to travel to an ancient, enchanted, autumnal forest to find the origin of Elsa's powers in a bid to to save their kingdom.

'Last Christmas'

Starring: Emilia Clarke, Henry Golding, Emma Thompson, Michelle Yeoh

Expected release: Thursday, November 21

It isn't entirely clear if George Michael and Wham!'s festive back-catalogue or Emilia Clarke is the real star of this Christmas classic-to-be, but I am happy for them to both share the limelight. The movie, set in London, stars Clarke as Kate, a who works as an elf in a Christmas decoration shop. Following ye olde festive movie trope, she is down on her luck, but everything seems to turn around when she meets a mysterious handsome stranger (Golding) who takes her ice skating (see, Christmas classic) and gets her to volunteer, a sure-fire way to get on Santa's nice list. The movie was co-written by Emma Thompson and her husband, Greg Wise, so based on that alone, I will be watching.

'Arctic Dogs'

Starring: Jeremy Renner, Heidi Klum, James Franco, John Cleese

Expected release: Thursday, December 5

Not an all-out Christmas movie, animation Arctic Dogs is about Swifty (Renner), an Arctic fox, who works in the mail room of the Arctic Blast Delivery Service and has big dreams of becoming a Top Dog courier husky. In the process, Swifty accidentally comes face to face with Otto Von Walrus (Cleese), an evil genius who has a plan to drill beneath Arctic surface to unleash enough ancient gas to melt the Arctic. Naturally, Swifty and pals get to work to save the world.

'Black Christmas'

Starring: Cary Elwes, Imogen Poots, Brittany O'Grady

Expected release: Thursday, December 12

Not a Christmas movie in the tinsel, elves and Santa sense of the term. It is, however, a horror film set during the holiday. A remake of the 1974 cult classic, a group of students are stalked by a stranger during their Christmas break. Based on the bloody candy cane on the poster, it looks set to be a gruesome.

More 2019 festive releases

November and December releases aren't limited to festive-themed flicks. Here is a round up of more movies to look out for over the holidays:

Charlie's Angels (expected Thursday November 14)

Jumanji: The Next Level (expected Thursday December 12)

Cats (expected Thursday December 19)

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (expected Thursday December 19)

Little Women (expected Thursday December 26)


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Updated: September 3, 2019 10:52 AM


https://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/film/2019-christmas-movies-the-trailers-are-starting-to-drop-1.902401


Zitat:
Fall Movie Preview: Upcoming Films in 2019
Summer is over and awards season is right around the corner. Here are the movies to look forward to in Fall 2019.

Feature David Crow
Aug 30, 2019


Summer is officially over. I know, I know, you might still have some grilling to do, or the kids haven’t yet gone back to school; even scientists will tell you, technically, autumn doesn’t begin for a few more weeks. But the days are already getting shorter, the weather is beginning to cool, and movies are in transition from blockbuster season to a seemingly endless awards one.

But that last bit should be happy tidings for moviegoers. Fall is a chance to recharge and cleanse the palate with some more adult-oriented fare while still enjoying big holiday entertainment for the whole family. Hollywood is gearing up to release what it considers to be its heavy-hitting dramas, starting with September’s major film festivals in Venice, Toronto, and New York. Yet looking ahead, you'll find a variety of enticing projects for every type of moviegoing taste. So without further ado, let’s preview what tricks and treats 2019 has left for us at the movies.

It Chapter Two

September 6

Halloween comes a little early with this sequel to the highest grossing horror movie ever. Adapting the other half of Stephen King’s magnum opus about collective childhoods and the troubled adults they damage, It Chapter Two jumps to the present day where the Losers’ Club is comprised of strangers forced to remember traumas better left forgotten 27 years later. With a cast led by the likes of Jessica Chastain as Beverly Marsh, James McAvoy as Bill Denbrough, and Bill Hader as Richie Tozier, the Losers must continue their multi-generational battle against Pennywise the Dancing Clown (Bill Skarsgård) in epic fashion.

read more: Fall 2019 TV Preview

Reportedly spanning a sizable 165-minute running time, It Chapter Two is passion project for director Andy Muschietti, who is gladly taking his time in presenting Derry with its supernatural reckoning. It’s a movie Muschietti and his sister, producer Barbara Muschietti, have been planning since before the original’s release and it is easily one of the most anticipated movies of the year. We talked in detail with Andy about the film right here.

Read more about It Chapter Two right here.

The Goldfinch

September 13

In a movie that will undoubtedly resonate with the world right now, John Crowley’s The Goldfinch appears to be an affecting human drama about the grief left behind in the wake of sudden violence. The film is the story of Theodore Decker (first Oakes Fegley and then Ansel Elgort), a young man who loses his mother in a terrorist bombing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The attack is fictional, but the consequences were quite real and raw in Donna Tartt’s novel, which is the basis of this film adaptation that also stars Nicole Kidman, Sarah Paulson, and Finn Wolfhard. The first film director John Crowley has made since the criminally underrated Brooklyn (2015), it is one to keep an eye on.

Read more about The Goldfinch here.


Hustlers

September 13

Often movies about Wall Street too eagerly show young women, be they exotic dancers, escorts, or partygoers, being eagerly exploited by finance bros. It’s nice to then have a film that’s ready to turn the tables on white collar crooks. Written and directed by Lorene Scafaria, who created the very underrated Seeking a Friend for the End of the World, Hustlers adapts a true story about strippers who picked the pockets of Wall Street elite. And with a cast that includes Jennifer Lopez, Constance Wu, Lili Reinhart, Cardi B, Keke Palmer, Julia Stiles, and Lizzo, this will hopefully be able to make it rain.


3 From Hell

September 16

There are some who would call Rob Zombie a genius, and we won’t lie that The Devil’s Rejects (2005) is brilliant. Yet there is some apprehension that after a number of less impressive films in the 14 years that followed, Zombie has chosen to continue a story that ended with all three of its central serial killers going out in a blaze of glory. 3 From Hell asks… what if they didn’t?

In the surprise trilogy closer of Rejects and House of 1000 Corpses (2003), Zombie picks up the narrative of Captain Spaulding (Sid Haig), Baby Firefly (Sheri Moon Zombie), and Otis Firefly (Bill Moseley). Miraculously surviving being shot dozens of time, the triumvirate has lived on as Charles Manson-inspired celebrity serial killers in prison… until they escape and start killing again. This exploitation horror movie is only being released as a Fathom Events special presentation on 900 screens between Sept. 16 and Sept. 18.


Ad Astra

September 20

The last decade has seen a renaissance of hard-hitting science fiction, but 2019 looks to bring an intriguing nightcap via Ad Astra. It’s a mysterious project from writer-director James Gray. Cryptically about an astronaut (Brad Pitt) who must travel to the furthest reaches of our solar system in order to find answers about his father (Tommy Lee Jones), there is a lot of mystery shrouding the effort. However, given that Gray’s last movie also dealt with the beauty and punishing cost of exploration with The Lost City of Z, returning to that theme in a science fiction follow-up is too appealing an offer not to board.


Rambo: Last Blood

September 20

When Sylvester Stallone first played John Rambo in First Blood, it was as a gritty anti-hero and veteran used and abused by the U.S. government in Vietnam. It was an anti-war story. That didn’t last given Stallone’s Rambo would go on to re-fight and win ‘Nam in his first sequel, and then team with those heroic Afghan warlords in Rambo III. Both films have aged… into something. But that hasn’t caused Stallone to retire to the bandana, although that is supposedly what will happen in Rambo: Last Blood. Marking Stallone’s fifth time up to bat as the legendary character, Last Blood is being marketed as an elegiac, Western-style sendoff for a hero who finally goes home. Think Logan. Will it succeed? We’ll know soon enough!


Downton Abbey

September 20

Better break out the good china and white tablecloths, because Downton Abbey is back, and they’re bringing the Queen of England with them! In a cinematic continuation of the loved—in some circles—PBS and ITV series about upstairs and downstairs melodrama, the Crawley family is back and the stakes have never been higher with the Queen of England en route for an afternoon luncheon at their regal English estate. It’s such a momentous occasion that butlers are coming out of retirement, early 20th century decorum is turning draconian, and surely Maggie Smith’s Dowager Countess will be working on her cutting putdowns. Brace thyself.


The Death of Dick Long

September 27

From Daniel Scheinert, director of Swiss Army Man, and A24 comes this intriguing new dramedy/possible horror movie? Yeah, it doesn't appear to be easy to categorize, but that might be the charm of The Death of Dick Long, a film set in small town Alabama where the cryptic death of a friend leads to all sorts of hijinks. And given the film wears Tarantino references on its sleeve, we have to assume that Dick will not be the only one going into that long goodnight.


Judy

September 27

Judy Garland is still a beloved icon for her fans. Having passed away 50 years ago, she remains treasured by each generation for her effervescent performance and singing in The Wizard of Oz (1939). She also starred in a slew of other classics, but the new biopic Judy is more interested in the later period of her life. On the precipice of her final downward spiral, Judy (Rene Zellweger) is middle-aged, regretful but still a star. The film likewise features Jessie Buckley, star of the incredibly underrated Wild Rose.


Joker

October 4

One of the most debated movies of the year kicks October off with a nice big smile. Warner Bros. and director Todd Phillips (The Hangover) reimagine comicdom’s greatest villain by way of Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy. Wearing its Scorsese influences on its sleeve, Joker is the rare superhero movie that’s as comfortable playing at prestigious film festivals as it is at comic cons. Indeed, tongues are already wagging. Yet what seems to have everyone in agreement is just how good Joaquin Phoenix is as the titular homicidal clown. There hasn’t been this kind of excitement for a comic book movie performance since, well, Heath Ledger put on a happy face in The Dark Knight.

A Batman-free origin story of the Clown Prince of Crime, Joker imagines its eponymous villain as Arthur Fleck, a would-be nice guy who at middle-age cannot figure out why he is always finishing last. Enjoying a relationship with his mother (Frances Conroy) that would give Freud a field day, Arthur eventually snaps in the face of societal decay in 1980s New York Gotham City. And now, he just wants to put a smile on your face, even if it kills you.


Lucy in the Sky

October 4

Noah Hawley is one of the most challenging and rewarding showrunners on television. Having taken advantage of "peak television" to produce hard-hitting dramas that often revel in unreliable narrators and the kind of knotty storytelling you used to only find in the movies, Hawley is making his big screen debut as a director on Lucy in the Sky. It's a cryptic premise about an astronaut (Natalie Portman) who returns to Earth seriously depressed by the mundanity of everyday life after experiencing a cosmic event. There is more than meets the eye here, and as its cast includes Portman, Jon Hamm, Dan Stevens, Zazie Beetz, and Nick Offerman, we are excited to unlock its mysteries soon.


Pain and Glory

October 4

Writer-director Pedro Almodóvar’s first film with Antonio Banderas since the hypnotic The Skin We Live In, Pain and Glory comes with a lot of buzz about being the best work Banderas has ever done, which is saying something. In the film, he plays a film director named Salvador Mallo whose life is falling apart in middle-age. At the end of his rope, Salvador begins recollecting on old acquaintances, real and possibly imagined. The film also reunites Amodóvar with his Volver muse Penélope Cruz for a project that looks decidedly wistful and intriguing.


Gemini Man

October 11

Once upon a time, Will Smith was the biggest movie star on the planet. When he appeared in an action movie in his 20s, it was going to be a big deal. And it might be again in Ang Lee’s trippy shoot ‘em up. Directed by one of the great filmmakers of our time, Gemini Man pits Will Smith against Will Smith with the miracle of CGI de-aging technology. Hence in the film, middle-aged Henry Brogan (Smith) encounters his exact double in Junior, a 25-year-old clone of Henry also played by Smith. Set at odds by a villainous Clive Owen, the two do battle in a story first hatched by Game of Thrones’ David Benioff. The talent around the film, which also includes Mary Elizabeth Winstead, hopefully foretells a sci-fi thriller of more cutting edge stuff.


The Addams Family


October 11

Charles Addams’ New Yorker cartoons about a ghastly family have proven as un-killable as, well, little Pugsley Addams whenever he falls into another of sister Wednesday’s murder traps. It’s been an amusing 1960s TV series, a wickedly entertaining pair of ‘90s movies that launched the career of Christina Ricci, and a slew of other comics, TV, and film projects. The latest is an animated film from MGM that looks like it may lean a little too heavily on pop culture references and celebrity casting, but that casting is admittedly on point with Charlize Theron as Morticia, Oscar Isaac as Gomez, Chloe Grace Moretz as Wednesday, Finn Wolfhard as Pugsley, and Nick Kroll as Uncle Fester. Here’s hoping The Addams Family (2019) can find their snap in the timeless material.


Parasite

October 11

Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite has been heralded as a masterpiece by nearly every critic whose watched it. After making some of the finest genre-bending cult classics of this decade, the Korean filmmaker has elevated his social satire into a picture he describes as a “tragi-comedy.” It also won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and is a coveted must-see at TIFF and the New York Film Festival later this fall.

Parasite begins as a potential comedy about one struggling family at the bottom of society latching itself, piece by piece, to the oblivious affluence of upper-middle class. It begins by the impoverished children pretending they don’t know each other as they become tutors for the richer family, but as with any story of haves and have-nots, there are apparently some grim twists when it becomes inescapable that those class lines can never truly blur. Considered by many to be the best film the director of Snowpiercer and Okja has ever made, we can't wait to see it with our own eyes.


Jay and Silent Bob Reboot

October 15

Kevin Smith has made a “reboot” of Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back by essentially remaking that 2001 movie for an allegedly new generation. Well played, Kev. The story of Jay and Silent Bob's (still blessedly Jason Mewes and Smith) road trip to Hollywood in order to stop a dark and gritty reboot of their earlier movie, Reboot is also about parentage as Jay learns he is a father to a young woman named Millie (Harley Quinn Smith). The film is likewise a chance for Smith to load up on cameos of familiar faces, both new and old, including Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, Joey Lauren Addams, Rosario Dawson, Shannon Elizabeth, Jason Lee, Melissa Benoist, Val Kilmer, Justin Long, Chris Hemsworth, and more. We’ll have to wait to see if this reunion is filled with new creative energy or just nostalgia, but until then...snoochie boochies.


Zombieland: Double Tap

October 18

Ten years is a long time. Most had given up on a sequel to 2009’s delightfully odd Zombieland. But perhaps the filmmakers were just waiting until every lead in the cast earned an Oscar nomination (or win in Emma Stone’s case)? It certainly makes for catchy marketing as the now A-listers are still competing for Zombie Kill of the Week.

The sequel finds Stone, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, and Abigail Breslin up to their old tricks, this time crashing at the White House for the winter. But hijinks threaten to turn into high drama as Breslin’s Little Rock sets off on her own and they begin meeting new and tenacious survivors. With the whole creative team in front of, and behind, the camera back, now’s a good time to start working on your cardio.


The Lighthouse

October 18

After writing and directing one of the seminal horror movies of the decade, Robert Eggers (The Witch) returns to New England folklore for his sophomore effort, though with a decidedly more recent, nautical vibe. Set at the turn of the 20th century the movie finds two lighthouse keepers spending their winter in grim weather and even grimmer company.

The toast of Cannes, The Lighthouse features performances by Robert Pattinson as Ephraim Winslow and Willem Dafoe as his elder, Thomas Wake. Its black-and-white vision evokes German Expressionist classics as much as tales of yore, as does the hinted Lovecraftian horror that waits for the men just offshore and below the surface.


Jojo Rabbit

October 18

Taika Waititi is a director as well known for his risk-taking as his idiosyncratic sense of humor, but he appears downright giddy about walking the line between hilarity and bad taste with his next effort, Jojo Rabbit. After all, it is Waititi under the tiny moustache and swastika as a rascally Adolf Hitler. An imaginary version of Hitler, to be clear.

In his latest writing and directing effort, Waititi, who is of Māori and Russian Jewish descent, plays the imagined BFF of a little boy named Jojo (Roman Griffith Davis), a lonely child growing up in Nazi Germany. With no real friends, he creates a good-hearted one in the visage of the Führer. It’s a wacky premise made all the more intriguing with its supporting cast that includes Scarlett Johansson and Sam Rockwell.


Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

October 18

For the first time since Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life in 2003, someone has convinced Angelina Jolie to do a sequel. Such is the power of Disney and their endless remakes. Thus enters Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, a sequel about Jolie’s supervillain-turned-questionable-heroine in the 2014 revisionist take on Sleeping Beauty. Apparently she’s about to revert to her evil ways though as Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning) is eager to marry her prince (Harris Dickinson). Yet Prince Phillip’s family might be of nefarious stock their own with Michelle Pfeiffer’s Queen Ingrith offering a new threat to Maleficent’s power. There is also Chiwetel Ejiofor doing his House Mouse duty, but hopefully this all-new story will be better than the studio’s other listless live-action remakes from 2019.


The Current War

October 25

Before there was Google versus Apple, or Steve Jobs versus Bill Gates, the original tech war was fought over the electric lightbulb between Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse—with Nikola Tesla as the spoiler on the fringes who was likely smarter than anyone else alive. Their battle shaped the 20th century to come, giving us the invention that literally took away the darkness of night. Alfonso Gomez-Rejon’s movie about the trio has been a long time coming. After the Weinstein Company collapsed for very good reasons, The Current War unfortunately got lost in the fallout. Now the movie is finally getting its release by 101 Studios, and with a talented cast that includes Benedict Cumberbatch as Edison, Michael Shannon as Westinghouse, and Nicholas Hoult as Tesla. While its reception was decidedly mixed at TIFF in 2017, we’ll keep an open mind given the electrifying subject matter.


Terminator: Dark Fate

November 1

The Terminator franchise has seen some rough patches as of late. Despite being borne out of two of the greatest action movies, James Cameron’s The Terminator (1984) and Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), there hasn’t been a good movie in the series since Linda Hamilton stepped away from playing Sarah Connor. Which is what makes Dark Fate so interesting. For the first time in nearly 30 years, Hamilton returns to the franchise to square off against a new cybernetic villain (Gabriel Luna). With director Tim Miller (Deadpool) helming the reunion, a returning Arnold Schwarzenegger, and interesting new talent like Mackenzie Davis joining their ranks, maybe this time the future is brighter.


Harriet

November 1

Harriet Tubman is supposed to be on our 20-dollar bills next year, but as with anything dealing with people of color, the current presidential administration couldn’t find the time to do its job. That doesn’t mean she can't be on the big screen now. In a biopic about slavery that is blessedly not about white liberators ending it, Harriet gives a cinematic account of Harriet Tubman’s fight to lead slaves to freedom via the underground railroad she herself escaped on. The film is directed by Luke Cage’s Kassi Lemmons and features Tony winner Cynthia Erivo as Harriet. The film is also stacked with a cast that features Leslie Odom Jr., Janelle Monáe, and Joe Alwyn.


The Irishman

November 1 (limited), November 27 (Netflix)

Robert De Niro has been trying to bring the controversial mob book, I Heard You Paint Houses, to the screen for about a decade, a road that has led him to a reunion with Martin Scorsese. The legendary pair’s first movie together since Casino in 1995, The Irishman is a reunion of much of the Goodfellas/Raging Bull team, including Joe Pesci. And as a sign of the changing times… it’s debuting on Netflix.

Robert De Niro plays Frank Sheeran, a union official who apparently claimed that he personally offed his buddy Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino). It’s an American crime epic that spans decades, offering Scorsese’s unique lens on the gray area between some organized labor and organized crime—and how Sheeran allegedly eased the friction between the two with bullets.


Doctor Sleep

November 8

Somehow Warner Bros. and writer-director Mike Flanagan convinced Stephen King to let them make a sequel to not only his novel The Shining, but specifically to Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining… an adaptation he notoriously detests. How’s that for spooky? Flanagan is one of the great horror directors of his generation—previously helming the superb King adaptation Gerald’s Game and Netflix’s The Haunting of Hill House—and now he is taking on the challenge of adapting King’s sequel to his most personal novel, as well as a sequel to one of the greatest horror films of all time.

In Doctor Sleep, we find Danny Torrance (Ewan McGregor) as a middle-aged man struggling, like his dad and grandpappy before him, with alcoholism. That and the knowledge he still has the psychic gift of “shining.” It’s the latter habit that attracts the attention of a creepy cult led by Rebecca Ferguson as Rose the Hat, a woman older than she looks. And she has designs on a new shining child too.


Last Christmas

November 8

Despite being best known as the Mother of Dragons, Emilia Clarke seems like a natural for the lighthearted bubbliness one usually associates with romantic comedies. Unfortunately for Ms. Clarke, romantic comedies are a rarity in modern Hollywood. But Last Christmas is poised to change that. Directed by comic maestro Paul Feig (Bridesmaids, A Simple Favor) and co-written by no less than Emma Thompson—an actor whose overlooked writing credits include definitive adaptations of Pride & Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility—Last Christmas follows Clarke as Kate, an aimless young woman working in a year-round Christmas store.

A love story about Clarke’s Kate and the Good Samaritan she meets named Tom (Henry Golding), the pair embark on a Yuletide romance that is supposed to have a major twist… one that the trailer might give away. Nevertheless, Golding is himself fresh off one of the best rom-coms in ages after Crazy Rich Asians last year, and he joins this project alongside Michelle Yeoh and Thompson herself, promising a sweet holiday treat.


Midway

November 8

Director Roland Emmerich attempts to go historical with a World War II epic that looks to be more battle-driven than the similarly themed Michael Bay movie, Pearl Harbor, yet remains just as glossy. With an all-star cast that includes Patrick Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Aaron Eckhart, Dennis Quaid, Luke Evans, Mandy Moore, Keean Johnson, Ed Skrein, Darren Criss, Nick Jonas, and more, we wish them all luck that this is better than Emmerich’s last American war epic, The Patriot.


Honey Boy

November 8

A film we saw back at Sundance, Honey Boy is absolutely a game-changing film for actor Shia LaBeouf. Loosely based on his own life, Honey Boy is a raw portal into his own complicated thoughts about growing up in show business and with a mercurial father. In the film, LaBeouf essentially plays his old man as James, the father of Otis (Noah Jupe,) a fictional child actor on an unnamed 1990s sitcom. That lad grows up (played by Lucas Hedges in his adult years) into an alcoholic by the time he’s a movie star in 2005, but Otis cannot bring himself to blame his father. LaBeouf plays that papa in a nigh unrecognizable performance that feels as much about exorcizing demons as it does creating an astonishingly personal piece of art that is beautifully essayed by director Alma Har’el. You can read our full review here.


Ford v Ferrari

November 15

In 1966, the idea of an American made car beating European engineering at the 24 Hours of Le Mans seemed incredulous. It still does. Yet this grease-and-bolts Cinderella story really occurred, and is the subject of an old-fashioned Hollywood epic—one of the last from a pre-Disney 20th Century Fox. Directed by James Mangold (Logan) the film stars Christian Bale and Matt Damon as the stateside driver and engineer gutsy enough to accept Ford’s offer to beat Ferrari at their own game. We’re more than ready to ride shotgun on that road trip.


Charlie’s Angels

November 15

The Charlie’s Angels franchise has seen highs and lows. Once a definite product of 1970s television culture, it also became a definite product of early 2000s blockbuster culture when it launched two films, at least one of which was quite charming for its time. An ill-advised television reboot in 2011 aside, it makes sense for Sony Pictures to bring the saga of three angelic women kicking ass back to the screen for a more modern sensibility. Helming that is Elizabeth Banks who both directs and appears in the film as Bosley, an apparent relative of previous Bosleys who include no less than Bill Murray and Bernie Mac. Indeed, Charlie’s Angels (2019) seems to posit the idea that it’s all canon, and the Angels are now international.

The trio we’re following in this one are Sabina Wilson (Kristen Stewart), Jane Kano (Ella Ballinska), and Elena (Naomi Scott). Actually, the film is in part about the recruitment of the latter, as she is responsible for the creation of a MacGuffin… but the real point is to update this fantasy for a more empowering and less leering version of badassery. Angels assemble.


The Lodge

November 15

Another winner we saw out of Sundance, The Lodge is chilling in multiple ways as the directors of Goodnight Mommy, Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz, craft a haunted tale about a cold that can freeze the blood in your veins… but still not reach the horror that might already reside there. After a horrible tragedy takes the life of a beloved mother, children Aidan (Jaedan Martell) and Mia (Lia McHugh) are not thrilled that in less than a year, their father has left them with his new girlfriend Grace (Riley Keough) for a week in the frozen wilderness. Grace can relate to the children’s plight having survived her own childhood trauma growing up in a cult, but when the three arise one morning to find they have no electricity and no food, finger-pointing turns into paranoia. Could there be a supernatural presence afoot, and are old demons taking on a ghostly form? It’s bleak stuff that we highly recommend.


The Report

November 15

This Amazon Studios original was one of the most talked about films at Sundance and is generating Oscar buzz around both Adam Driver and Annette Bening, as they play real-life Senate staffer Daniel Jones and U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein. Set just after the end of the Bush administration, Jones was assigned by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence to look into the CIA's Detention and Interrogation program instituted after the horrors of 9/11. In other words, it examined and would bring to light how the United States government tortured prisoners and "enemy combatants" during the War on Terror from 2001 to 2006. However, the film is as much about the struggle to bring that report to the public in the face of monumental opposition--including by the Obama White House--and exacting political pressure. It is going to be a major awards contender.


Frozen II

November 22

When Frozen came out in 2013, it signaled a new revival for Walt Disney Animation Studios and harkened back to the Broadway styled magic of their best renaissance movies in the 1990s. It also offered new types of Disney princesses that six years later—a literal childhood—still enchants wee ones whenever the names “Elsa and Anna” are uttered. Hence Frozen II arrives with the fanfare of a generational touchstone, as Elsa (Idina Menzel) and Anna (Kristen Bell) travel north of Arendelle and into an autumn-bound land wherein answers to Elsa’s past (and perhaps their parents’ fate?) reside. The whole cast of transcendent talent is back, as are directors Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck, and Oscar-winning songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez. Better be ready to hum tunes from this one until well after 2020.


21 Bridges

November 22

The kind of old-school dramatic thriller that used to be part and parcel for Hollywood, there is something refreshingly retro about 21 Bridges. It’s a police thriller where one detective attempts to stop the escape of a criminal crew who murdered eight cops. Chadwick Boseman makes quite the dashing detective, indeed, as he closes down all 21 bridges and tunnels into Manhattan to thwart their escape. But we doubt that will be enough in this action throwback that was produced by the Russo Brothers.


A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

November 22

Tom Hanks is Mister Rogers. That’s it. That’s the movie. It might be a tall order to surpass last year’s heartwarming documentary, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, but Hanks is always compelling to watch, and the fact it’s directed by Marielle Heller—the filmmaker behind last year’s fantastic Can You Ever Forgive Me?—has us happy to put on a cozy sweater and swing by the neighborhood.


Knives Out

November 27

Rian Johnson has wanted to make an Agatha Christie-inspired murder mystery since before 2012's Looper and prior to a little film called The Last Jedi coming his way. Now after making what some of us think is the best Star Wars movie of this century, he is returning to the idea of an old-fashioned whodunit. Knives Out looks both retro and refreshingly different, and early buzz has us wondering who is the deadliest among the movie’s killer cast, including Chris Evans, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Colette, Ana de Armas, Lakeith Stanfield, Michael Shannon, Christopher Plummer, and Daniel Craig.


Portrait of a Lady on Fire

December 6

Céline Sciamma’s highly anticipated Portrait of a Lady on Fire is a provocative story about art, desire, and everything in between. Set in Brittany at the end of the 18th century, the film centers on Marianne (Noémie Merlant), an artist who takes an illicit commission to secretly paint a portrait of Héloise (Adèle Haenel). Héloise’s wealthy family wishes her to marry and needs a portrait in order to entice suitors, however Héloise has no wish to be married, period. So Marianne introduces herself as a maid and potential friend to along the coast where her subject likes to take her morning walks, all while quietly surveying her new friend’s face for portraiture. But as she finds herself becoming attracted to Héloise, things start getting… complicated. Roundly hailed as one of the best movies of 2019 by all who’ve seen it, it is one to keep an eye on.


Jumanji: The Next Level

December 13

Before its release, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle looked like it had potential to be a charming throwback to ‘80s body-swapping comedies. But we doubt even Dwayne Johnson was ready for it to be so warmly received that it had better legs than The Last Jedi, knocking it out of #1 spot at the box office for all of January 2018. Now the revived franchise returns along with a winning cast that includes Johnson, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan, and Jack Black. But this time Johnson and Hart are essentially new characters, playing video game avatars of grandfatherly Danny DeVito and Danny Glover instead of teenagers. Yeah, we’re already smiling.


Black Christmas

December 13

Blumhouse Productions has remade Black Christmas. While not the first production company to do so, hopefully they’ll be the most successful at updating that 1974 cult classic which many would argue inspired Halloween (1978). It probably helps the remake is actually set in ’74 as well, following the same infamous narrative about a group of college students being stalked by a stranger during Christmas break. This new take on Black Christmas is co-written and directed by Sophia Takal, and stars Imogen Poots, Brittany O’Grady, and Cary Elwes.


Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

December 20

Easily the most anticipated movie—excuse me, event—of the holiday season, all eyes are on The Rise of Skywalker, the alleged final chapter of the “Skywalker Saga.” In other words, it end the story of all Star Wars movies released to date, as well as follow-up the installment that divided the fanbase, The Last Jedi.

Disney and Lucasfilm are pulling out the big blasters, bringing J.J. Abrams back to the saga after successfully reviving it in The Force Awakens and he’s bringing back an old school classicalism to the way it’s filmed. It is in this context that Rey (Daisy Ridley), Finn (John Boyega), Poe (Oscar Isaac), Rose (Kelly Marie Tran), and the eternally conflicted Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) will find out where they all finally stand in the true balance of the Force.


Cats

December 20

Go on… admit it. You’re morbidly curious, aren’t you? As a film that might be a testament to the maxim of “just because you can does not mean you should,” Cats is Tom Hooper and Universal Pictures’ lavish adaptation of the famed Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. And while performers on stage spent decades dressing as cats to quote T.S. Eliot’s witticisms about felines, the all-star cast of the movie have been computer animated into cat-human hybrids. It’s gaudy, arguably grotesque, but also goddamn intriguing. During these perilously formulaic times, a studio would invest in this?! Plus, the dance choreography should be nifty. Yeah, we know what curiosity did to the cat, but we’d be lying if we didn’t admit we want to see exactly why someone thought this would be a good idea.


Bombshell

December 20

Roger Ailes passed away in 2017, but it’s safe to say we are very much living in the world he helped build. As the mastermind behind Fox News, which he ran from its inception and until he was forced to resign due to allegations of sexual misconduct, Ailes created cable news as we understand it, as well as the misinformation apparatus that still controls whatever the current President of the United States is thinking when he’s tweeting in the morning. This film from director Jay Roach (Trumbo, Game Change) recounts the women who put their careers on the line to expose Ailes and the toxic male culture he groomed at Fox News.

The cast includes Nicole Kidman as Gretchen Carlson, Charlize Theron as Megyn Kelly, Margot Robbie as Kayla Pospisil, Alice Eve as Ainsley Earhardt, Allison Janney as Susan Estrich, Ashley Greene as Abby Huntsman, Malcolm McDowell as Rupert Murdoch, and John Lithgow as Ailes. It's safe to say this is not going to win any fans at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue or its favorite news network.


Little Women

December 25

Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women is one of the formative novels in American literature, living on as one generation of young women passes it down to the next. While the lives of the March sisters have been adapted masterfully to the screen before, but the fact that Greta Gerwig chose the book as her follow-up to Lady Bird creates instant intrigue.

Apparently by focusing more on the second volume of the novel (originally published under the title Good Wives), Gerwig zeroes in on the forward-thinking of a book about young women navigating a professional world they weren’t expected to enter. Still the tale of four impoverished sisters in New England growing up during the Civil War, Gerwig's Little Women also comes with an astounding cast, including Saoirse Ronan, Meryl Streep, Florence Pugh, Emma Watson, Laura Dern, and Timothée Chalamet.


1917

December 25

Director Sam Mendes has crafted the most intense-looking war film since, well, Dunkirk (2017). Appearing to be cut from similar cloth, Mendes goes back more than a century to the bloodiest year of the First World War to present a pressure-cooker of a premise: two young British soldiers (George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman) must cross enemy lines to warn fellow Tommies of an ambush during the Third Battle of Ypres. If they fail to get there in time, 1,600 men, including the brother of Chapman’s Blake, will die. It's a gruesome depiction of trench warfare that Mendes co-wrote alongside Krysty Wilson-Cairns (Penny Dreadful). The movie also stars Colin Firth, Benedict Cumberbatch, Mark Strong, Richard Madden, and Andrew Scott. This will surely add some adrenaline (and despair?) to your holiday season.


Spies in Disguise

December 25

Blue Sky Productions has made an animated film where Will Smith plays the voice of a James Bond-like character. While Blue Sky movies can be hit or miss, it could be an amusing premise for wee ones who have had enough of Star Wars or Jumanji. The movie also stars the voices of Karen Gillan, Tom Holland, Rachel Brosnahan, and Ben Mendelsohn.


A Hidden Life

December

Writer-director Terrence Malick’s latest movie will likely divide audiences and critics, as it’s already begun to do after Cannes. However, this more often than not tends to be the case with latter-day Malick, and A Hidden Life certainly features a premise far more compelling than anything he’s worked on as of late. Based on the true story of Franz Jägerstätter, an Austrian Catholic who refused to fight for the Nazis in World War II on moral grounds, the film goes behind the veil of the Third Reich to find the face of moral clarity in amoral times that left many feeling ambiguous and tempted into apathy. Could Malick be drawing any parallels to today? The film also marks the final performances of Bruno Ganz and Michael Nyqvist.


Little Monsters


TBA

A real delightful horror-comedy we caught back in Sundance, we are still waiting on a U.S. release date for this wicked good-time. Starring Lupita Nyong'o as likely the best kindergarten teacher you've ever seen, she takes her class to a petting zoo... that is then overrun with zombies. There are dismemberments, disembowlments, and one particularly nasty creation by Josh Gad now in his anti-Olaf stages as he plays a vain children's entertainer, but the standout is how bubbly it all is whenever Nyong'o picks up a ukulele. You can read our full review here.


https://www.denofgeek.com/us/movies/282889/fall-movie-preview-2019

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Laut blairwitch.de wird 'The Lodge' am 06.02.2020 in die deutschen Kinos kommen
https://www.blairwitch.de/news/the-lodg ... 020-78765/

Eine deutsche DVD ist für den 29.05.2020 angekündigt

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Sorry Richard und danke an Jessie für die wundervolle Sig!

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Heute ist der Tag des Kino-Terminkalenders. :lol: Danke, Redluna. :daumen:

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Italienisches über 'The Lodge':

Zitat:
moose turds@mooseturds

Thread of random media mentions of #RichardArmitage projects from the last few months #TheLodge #TheStranger #BerlinStation #UncleVanya

First up, via CIAK, Italy, Dec. 28, 2019


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https://twitter.com/mooseturds/status/1216055533549031426

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Zum baldigen Kinostart - auch in Deutschland:

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https://twitter.com/RCArmitage/status/1224653547343622144

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Es gibt ein neues Poster:

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https://twitter.com/RCArmitage/status/1224824378296356864


Zitat:
Cool

The Alamo Drafthouse Is Launching A New Letterpress Poster Series
And they're kicking it off with THE LODGE.


By Birth.Movies.Death. Team
Feb. 04, 2020

Get your tickets to see The Lodge at the Alamo Drafthouse here.

We are, as you may have gathered, big fans of Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz's The Lodge, which hits theaters on February 7th. We are also big fans of unique and collectible movie posters. It is therefore with great excitement that we bring you the following press release, from our friends at the Alamo Drafthouse:

"New York, NY --- February 4, 2020 --- Alamo Drafthouse Cinema has begun production of a monthly series of limited edition posters for upcoming new releases and repertory screenings, all hand-printed on an 83-year-old letterpress. The first poster in the series was designed by Alan Hynes for THE LODGE, the Sundance 2019 breakout set for release this February from NEON. Directed by Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz, THE LODGE is a psychological horror masterpiece that stars Riley Keough, Alicia Silverstone, and Richard Armitage.

Audiences’ first chance to see THE LODGE will be this Tuesday, February 4th, at an exclusive sneak preview beamed to 25 Alamo Drafthouse locations. These screenings will be followed by a Q&A broadcast live from Alamo Drafthouse Brooklyn featuring directors Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala, along with actor Jaeden Martell. Tickets are still available at drafthouse.com/show/livestream-q-a-the-lodge.

“Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz stunning feature provided the perfect muse for Alan Hyne’s imagination to run wild,” says Alamo Drafthouse CEO and founder Tim League. “We look forward to continuing the long-tradition tradition of hand-printed letterpress event posters in this monthly series.”

Last September, Alamo Drafthouse unveiled plans for The Press Room: a museum, letterpress print shop, bar, and event space that’s set to open this summer alongside Alamo Drafthouse Lower Manhattan, with a second location in Orlando slated for the end of 2020. Since then, a functioning letterpress print shop has been constructed inside Alamo Drafthouse’s headquarters in Austin. The shop is currently printing from and inventorying over 60,000 vintage advertisement plates set to adorn the walls of The Press Room.

The hand-printed, hand-numbered limited edition posters will be exclusively available at Alamo Drafthouse box office locations set to screen THE LODGE."

At which Drafthouse locations can you catch The Lodge? We're glad you asked!

2/7 | Alamo Drafthouse Brooklyn

2/7 | Alamo Drafthouse Los Angeles

2/14 | Alamo Drafthouse Austin - South Lamar

2/14 | Alamo Drafthouse Austin - Lakeline

2/14 | Alamo Drafthouse San Francisco

2/14 | Alamo Drafthouse Denver - Sloans

2/14 | Alamo Drafthouse Denver - Westminster

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse Raleigh

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse San Antonio - Park North

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse San Antonio - Westlakes

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse New Braunfels

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse Katy

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse Lubbock

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse El Paso

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse Kansas City

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse Springfield

2/21 | Alamo Drafthouse Tempe

2/21 Alamo Drafthouse Gilbert

And what can we expect from the Drafthouse letterpress poster series in the near future? Good stuff!

"The next poster in the series will be AGFA’s 35MM HORROR TRAILER SHOW, which will take place on March 5th – 3/5 – or Reel Film Day, an industry celebration of celluloid culture. The poster will be printed from over 150 vintage letterpress movie ad plates out of The Press Room archive, with a portion of proceeds benefiting the mission of the American Genre Film Archive, a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to preserving genre film history."

Letterpressed movie posters is a really cool idea, and it's doubly exciting that the Drafthouse is using its newfound printing powers to tackle stuff like The Lodge and AGFA's 35MM Horror Trailer Show (the world already has plenty of Robocop posters; let's get some new blood on these walls). We look forward to seeing what other titles this poster series captures, and hope you'll all give The Lodge a shot when it hits theaters on Feb. 7th. It's real creepy.


https://birthmoviesdeath.com/2020/02/04/the-alamo-drafthouse-is-launching-a-new-letterpress-poster-series/amp

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Ein Interview mit Riley Keough und dem Regie-Duo:

http://amp.denofgeek.com/us/movies/horr ... ssion=true

Zitat:
Riley Keough, Jaeden Martell and Lia McHugh in The Lodge
12'
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Why The Lodge is One of This Year’s Horror Standouts
The directors and star of The Lodge on making a true chiller, and how anxiety can 'seduce' an audience into facing tough truths.
INTERVIEW
Don Kaye

Feb 6, 2020
The Lodge is the latest entry in the ongoing horror renaissance that has been happening in cinema for the better part of 10 years now. The movie follows a divorced father named Richard (Richard Armitage, The Hobbit) who is trying to take care of his two children (It’s Jaeden Martell and newcomer Lia McHugh) after a shocking tragedy leaves them without their mother.

When Richard has to return to work, he leaves the two siblings in the care of his new girlfriend Grace (Riley Keough, Logan Lucky) at the family’s isolated winter lodge, in the hope that they will get to know each other before he returns for Christmas. But Grace--who has a haunted past of her own--and the kids soon find themselves at odds with each other and at the mercy of forces they may not be able to control.


Like so many of the outstanding horror films we’ve seen over the past few years, The Lodge is not what it appears to be at first. The film and story play with your empathy and allegiance while ultimately telling a genuinely disturbing tale of family dynamics twisted and damaged by a series of bad choices. The movie is the first English language feature from Austrian filmmakers Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala, who shocked audiences in 2014 with their debut, the harrowing Goodnight Mommy (also a film about a family facing catastrophe).


The Lodge (co-written by the directors and Sergio Casci) is a production of Hammer Films, the legendary genre studio that was resurrected more than a decade ago and has generated a small but impressive slate of new horror movies since, including Let Me In (2010) and The Woman in Black (2012). Den of Geek started with the Hammer connection when we sat down to interview the directors and Keough about their unsettling new film, which stays with you long after you’ve left the theater.


Den of Geek: I read that you got sent this script by Hammer and I'm wondering, having worked sort of in the genre space now for two films, did the Hammer name mean something to you when you saw that? Did you watch Hammer films growing up?


Severin Fiala: Of course. We were so excited. I mean we hoped so much that the script wouldn't suck because we got many, many scripts. Usually the way Hollywood works obviously is they think you're this type of filmmaker, they only send you this type of script style and they somehow thought we were like the world's leading expert in twin movies. So they only send us scripts with twins and we felt, okay, we're not going to do any of this because it's boring just doing the same thing over and over again. And then we got this script which said 'Untitled Hammer Horror Movie' and we prayed that it would be good and we liked it.



You also wanted to do some work on it yourselves. Did it change a lot as you worked on it?



Veronika Franz: I mean it was very playful, which is what we kind of connected to. It was playing with the audience and playing also with expectations of genre cinema and film history in a way. But you know, we have a very distinctive way of making films and seeing films, and we have a certain idea of how it should look.


We are also not so much into dialogue. We always tried to find the scene where nobody would talk instead of having dialogue. So one of our goals would be a silent movie actually one day [Laughs]. So this is very kind of specific and no screenwriter can fulfill this kind of expectations. That's why we always have to take the script and make it our own in a way, to create some more atmosphere as we like to see it in cinema.


Severin Fiala: Yeah, Sergio, he didn't specifically write it for us, so we just read it and wanted to make it our own. I think that's a thing only we can do and I think it was hard for Sergio because he's a master in writing dialogue and it was super funny.

Riley, did you watch Goodnight Mommy and then run the other way in horror?

Riley Keough: I watched Goodnight Mommy and then met them and then the contrast between the film and them was like, "Oh, this is going to be weird." It just seemed like it would be an interesting experience.


What attracted you to this script when you saw it and to this character of Grace?


Riley Keough: I think there's a part of me that's always attracted to things at the time that are things that I feel like I need to play for whatever reason. I don't know what that is. That's the part that doesn't really make sense. But whether that's to get it out of me or try something I haven't tried or a lot of the time it's doing things that I feel will be challenging. And when I read this, I have never done a film where I walk away from it and go, that was easy, you know? That's how I like to work.


And so when I read this, I was excited that I wasn't totally sure where it was going. That's always nice when you read scripts because most of the time you know exactly what's going to happen when you read them. And then second of all, she was just obviously a very complicated person. That felt challenging to me and like something that I wanted to do.


You've said something to the effect that playing a role like this actually can bring out some anxieties in yourself as well. Is that something that you kind of have to struggle with while you're playing the role or do you make it work for you?



Riley Keough: Well, I struggle with anxiety every day, so it kind of depends. It gets triggered by random stuff, I don't even know. So I think definitely trying to delve in and play somebody for whom that is taking over their entire mind was a little scary. But weirdly when I'm controlling it and I've decided that's what I'm going to do, I'm in control and therefore it didn't control me for whatever reason.

Did you do any research into the psychology of cult members and cult membership?



Riley Keough: They had a list of films to watch and specific groups to look into. And I watched a bunch of documentaries. I spoke with some people who had similar experiences and I just read as much as I could. To me the part that was really disturbing was the mass suicide, so that was something that I was really fixated on--like how that would manifest in a human being to be a part of something that extreme.

So I watched documentaries and did as much as I could. And then of course I have a little bit to contribute as far as mental health goes because I do have some experience with those things. So it was combining all of that information, my own experience with anxiety, and kind of trying to do justice to somebody that would've gone through something like that.


What were the qualities that Riley brought from the perspective of a director?



Veronika Franz: I think what we really liked about Riley was that she was open to going on this journey with us together. We tried to shoot in sequence, so we tried to hold hands and go forward towards the abyss as far as we could, which helped the whole development of the character and the whole development of the story. As we kind of went forward with the story with her altogether in this kind of house in the middle of nowhere, I think we achieved more than we expected.


You shot everything in a real lodge. Can you talk a little bit about the benefits of doing that? Also, did you try and keep the mood sustained on the set when you were not shooting, or did you try to lighten things up a little bit?

Severin Fiala: I think, generally, when it comes to all the aspects of filmmaking we think starting from something real and keeping it as real as possible is the way we would go for. So we felt as many real things we can include, weather, a real house, real surroundings, real cold, it's going to really help to film to make it feel authentic and real.


Veronika Franz: At one point we even turned down the heating so that the house would be really cold. We tried to make it as real as possible.


Severin Fiala: Also for example, for one of the weirdest locations, this cross-shaped house, that's also actually a real place built like a memorial site for someone's father who died in this spot. So they built this weird house and we saw that and we felt we needed to include this. I mean, it was not in the script obviously, a place like that, but we felt okay, but it's there, it's real and it's so special. So we need to find a way of having it in our film.


Veronika Franz: I don't know if this is the correct word for it, but we like intuitive actors and actresses. We like when they are there, and they don't pretend. They are there at the moment. And I think Riley is really great at that. She and the kids shared this "in the moment" thing. Actually we haven't experienced it in Austria, at that level of quality or that perfection.

Riley Keough: It's an easy thing to do when there's nothing around you.



Actors by their nature have to be open to each other. Is that easier in some way with kids because they don't have all the emotional armor that we adults wear?

Riley Keough: So much easier and so much more fun. It's kids and it's non-professional actors that is the most fun because they're not in their head at all and they're super just in the moment. That's so fun to work with. It's spontaneous, and things might not happen the way they just happened on the previous take. And that's where I have the most fun. So yeah, children, animals, dogs, non-professional actors.


Severin Fiala: People say in film school never shoot with kids and with animals.

Riley Keough: And it's the most fun.

Severin Fiala: The opposite is true.

Veronika Franz: Because you get something you don't expect. Those are true moments you can get and I think cinema and film is about that.


For the three of you, as an actor and as filmmakers, what do you find most interesting about working in the genre space?



Veronika Franz: We always say, because you can under the cover of a suspenseful kind of entertaining film, you can address issues, taboos or dark themes of society you would not maybe want to see in cinema if it would be a documentary.

Severin Fiala: Who would want to watch a film with the scenes about trauma and loss and grief and stuff? People think, okay, I'm not going to watch if it makes me sad or I don't want to see this right now. But if it's labeled as a horror film and if it's in fact thrilling and entertaining to a certain degree, people will watch it. And that's seducing people to watch something they would normally close their eyes from. That's what we like.

Veronika Franz: I think the really great horror movies, they are like that actually. So they address fears and make them universal, because people share fears. I think if you talk to people about what they're afraid of, it's very similar.

Riley Keough: I mean my answers are probably their answers, but also when I'm watching scary movies, it's a break because it's worse than my life. You know? In the same way that life can be tough and people want to escape, there are extreme versions of that and horror is one of those.

I think it's the same thing with Disney movies. It's a total drastic change from reality. I think that's a difference between watching a film that's like reality and then watching something that's an intensified version like horror or fantasy, or something to where it totally makes you escape. If I'm having a really shitty time and I put on a regular film about regular people, I'll probably not pay attention. But if I'm having a really bad week and I put on something really fucking scary, it's like for a minute I'm like, oh my God, at least I'm not being chased down a hallway by 10 monsters and murdered. It's kind of a good way to escape.

The Lodge is out in theaters this Friday, Feb. 7.

Don Kaye is a Los Angeles-based entertainment journalist and associate editor of Den of Geek. Other current and past outlets include Syfy, United Stations Radio Networks, Fandango, MSN, RollingStone.com and many more. Read more of his work here. Follow him on Twitter @donkaye

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Und es gibt einen offiziellen Soundtrack:

https://twitter.com/FilmMusicSite/statu ... 32928?s=20

Zitat:
Milan Records has released a soundtrack for 'The Lodge' composed by Saunder Jurriaans & Danny Bensi https://filmmusicsite.com/soundtracks.cgi?id=80367


... mit teils sehr biblischen Titeln:

https://www.filmmusicsite.com/en/soundt ... i?id=80367

Zitat:
1. The Lodge 1:25
2. Balloons and Whispers 1:06
3. Preparing 1:12
4. Nose Bleeds and Crucifixes 0:48
5. Ready to Go 1:43
6. Scar 1:21
7. The Ice 0:48
8. The Painting 1:10
9. Shrine 0:52
10. Checking In 1:28
11. Undercovers 0:41
12. Nightmare 1:25
13. Repent 1:26
14. Should We Pray Now? 0:31
15. The Cross House 1:50
16. Flowers 2:07
17. Crucifix 2:25
18. Obituary 4:11
19. We Have to Stop This 0:43
20. Back To The Lodge 1:35
21. Murder 2:06
22. Sacrifice 2:28
23. Last Supper

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.02.2020, 19:59 
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Arianna hat geschrieben:
... mit teils sehr biblischen Titeln:

Murder? Flowers? ... ;) Nicht bös' sein. Hatte einen harten Tag und muss gerade ein bißchen herumalbern. Und zum Horrorfilm ist das das perfekte Kontrastprogramm. :irre:

Danke für Deine fleißigen Sammelaktivitäten heute, Arianna. :daumen: :kuss:

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Laudine hat geschrieben:
Arianna hat geschrieben:
... mit teils sehr biblischen Titeln:

Murder? Flowers? ... ;) Nicht bös' sein. Hatte einen harten Tag und muss gerade ein bißchen herumalbern. Und zum Horrorfilm ist das das perfekte Kontrastprogramm. :irre:



Mir sprang da offensichtlich das "last supper" zu sehr in die Augen...

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.02.2020, 21:15 
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Ich gebe ja zu, dass ich das Kruzifix durchaus auch wahrgenommen habe. :kuss:

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Ein nicht uninteressantes Interview mit dem Regieteam:

Zitat:
The Lodge – Interview: Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala sorgen für frostigen Horror!

Der Winter ist in Deutschland aktuell Mangelware. Doch zumindest im Kino kann man sich ab heute so richtig einschneien und von frostiger Kälte benebeln lassen – mit grauenhaften Folgen für alle Beteiligten! Von Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala (The Field Guide to Evil), einem der spannendsten Filmemacher-Duos, das die europäische Genrefilm-Landschaft derzeit zu bieten hat, kommt The Lodge, der unterkühlten Horror heraufbeschwört, wie es nur ein Psycho-Albtraum im Stile von The Shining vermag. Wir haben uns anlässlich der deutschen Kinopremiere mit Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala zusammengesetzt und über ihren aufregenden zweiten Film nach dem umjubelten Horror-Festival-Senkrechtstarter Ich seh, ich seh (Goodbye Mommy) gesprochen. Dabei geht es um Themen wie die einmalige Gelegenheit, mit der legendären britischen Kult-Horrorfilmschmiede Hammer Films (The Quiet Ones, Die Frau in Schwarz) zusammenzuarbeiten, aber auch die neuen und veränderten Drehbedingungen in Kanada und das besondere Zusammenspiel innerhalb des prominenten Casts, darunter Richard Armitage (Der Hobbit und Storm Hunters), Alicia Silverstone, Jaeden Martell (Stephen Kings ES) und Riley Keough (It Comes at Night, Mad Max: Fury Road).

Schon Shining hat uns gelehrt: Verschneite, abgelegene Berghütten verheißen nichts Gutes! In The Lodge mischt sich aber noch etwas anderes unter eisige Kälte, Einsamkeit und langsam zunehmende Paranoia – unheilvolle Anzeichen auf einen mysteriösen Todeskult, finstere Rituale und ein düsteres Geheimnis. Wieder stellen beide unsere Vorstellung von Familienidylle auf eine harte Probe. Denn was Riley Keough (American Honey, Mad Max: Fury Road), Jaeden Martell (ES, ES: Kapitel 2, The Book of Henry), Lia McHugh (Along Came the Devil) während ihrer Tage und Nächte in der titelgebenden Lodge durchleben, kommt einem echten Horrortrip gleich.

BlairWitch.de: Sie haben sich für ihren neuen Langfilm nach ICH SEH ICH SEH fünf Jahre Zeit gelassen, lediglich 2018 noch ein Segment für A FIELD GUIDE TO EVIL gedreht. Wie viel Zeit floss nun letztendlich in THE LODGE?

Severin Fiala: Es war eine längere Geschichte. Es ist schon ein paar Jahre her, dass wir die erste Fassung des Drehbuchs bekommen haben und standen seitdem immer wieder mit dem Originalautor in Kontakt. Wir haben das Ende etwas geändert, was dazu geführt hat, dass wir den ganzen Film anpassen mussten. Insgesamt hat sich dieser Prozess, natürlich nicht durchgehend, fast drei Jahre gezogen.

Veronika Franz: Man muss das natürlich so sehen: Heutzutage ist es nicht mehr so, dass man einen einzigen Film im Kopf hat und plant. Wir hatten eigentlich schon einen anderen Film geschrieben, der jedoch von der Förderung nicht finanziert wurde. Das hat sich mittlerweile geändert, den drehen wir nun nächsten Sommer. ICH SEH ICH SEH war ja ein überraschend großer Erfolg und das beschäftigt einen neben dem Schreiben des Drehbuchs noch ein Jahr lang. Nach der Uraufführung kommt der Film in verschiedenen Ländern raus, zum Teil erst viele Monate später, und dorthin reist man dann auch. Jeder Film dauert als Regisseur bestimmt drei Jahre, vom Drehbuch über das Filmen bis zur Nachbearbeitung.

Severin Fiala: Bis zum nächsten Film wird es sicherlich nicht wieder so lange dauern. Aber den „ICH SEH ICH SEH“-Schock mussten wir erst einmal verdauen.

THE LODGE wurde produziert von den legendären britischen Hammer-Studios, die zuletzt ja u.a. für „Die Frau in Schwarz“ oder „The Quiet Ones“ verantwortlich waren. Fühlt sich das anders an, wenn man plötzlich für so ein renommiertes Horror-Studio arbeitet oder kann man das ausblenden?

Severin Fiala: Wir konnten das gut ausblenden, weil wir einfach so viele Dinge zu tun hatten, dass wir wenig zum Denken gekommen sind. Wir waren begeistert, als wir das Drehbuch von ihnen bekommen haben und beim ersten Treffen sicherlich auch ehrfürchtig. Aber dann entwickelt sich das in eine normale Arbeitsbeziehung. Da hat man nicht viel Zeit, sich über den Legendenstatus Gedanken zu machen.

Veronika Franz: Der schönste und gleichzeitig einschüchterndste Moment war, als wir das Drehbuch erhalten haben. Da stand dann „Untitled horror film. Hammerfilm Productions“.

Jetzt ist es ja auch so, dass im Gegensatz zu ICH SEH ICH SEH ein internationaler Cast mitspielt und auch einige größere Namen dabei sind, z.B. Jaeden Martell, Richard Armitage, Alicia Silverstone oder Riley Keough. Ist die Arbeit, abgesehen von der Sprache, anders als die Arbeit mit deutschsprachigen Schauspielern?

Severin Fiala: Ehrlich gesagt war das über weite Strecken leichter. Es gibt in Amerika einfach so viele großartige Schauspieler, und anders als im deutschsprachigen Raum auch einige, deren Gesichter man nicht schon in- und auswendig kennt. Die bringen ein unfassbares Talent, eine unfassbare Gabe mit, die uns wirklich hat staunen lassen. Der schon angesprochene Jaeden Martell hat die Fähigkeit, immer als er selbst zu spielen und sich in unfassbare Situationen zu bringen.

Veronika Franz: Wenn wir vom deutschsprachigen Raum reden, reden wir von Österreich. Österreich hat einfach eine unglaubliche Theaterproduktion, in Deutschland gibt es natürlich viel mehr Filmschauspieler im herkömmlichen Sinne. Bei uns lernen alle am Theater, etwas was z.B. Riley oder Jaeden noch nie gemacht haben. Auch wir haben großartige Filmschauspieler, aber eben deutlich weniger.

Schnell ist klar: In dieser Hütte stimmt etwas nicht! ©SquareOne Entertainment

Da hat man in Amerika dann einfach mehr Auswahl.

Veronika Franz: Genau, und die bereiten sich dann auch alle völlig selbstständig und allein vor. Wir waren am Anfang etwas beunruhigt, dass wir zu wenig Zeit haben. Aber das war gar kein Problem.

Severin Fiala: Lia McHugh und Jaeden Martell kannten sich zu dem Zeitpunkt noch nicht gut, wir wollten aber, dass sie viel Zeit miteinander verbringen, weil sie Bruder und Schwester spielen. Wir haben sie dann einfach improvisiert über ihre Filmmutter schimpfen lassen. Die konnten einfach 20 Minuten über diese Figur reden, ohne irgendetwas zu sagen, was nicht mit dem Drehbuch übereingestimmt hätte.

Sie haben das Drehbuch also komplett verinnerlicht…

Severin Fiala: Ja, und zwar schon zu dem Zeitpunkt, an dem sie am Set ankamen.

Veronika Franz: Wir sind auch Menschen, die Schauspieler nicht einfach Dialog auswendig lernen lassen. Wir wollen sie kennen lernen, textlich wenn nötig etwas ändern. Wir haben das Bestreben, dass die Schauspieler natürlich sein können und sie etwas Neues erschaffen, an das wir vorher vielleicht nicht gedacht haben.

Das sind doch auch die Momente, die einen Film erst so richtig ausmachen. Ich hatte bei THE LODGE das Gefühl, dass die Chemie der Schauspieler untereinander einfach gestimmt hat.


Veronika Franz: Ja, darüber sind wir glücklich. Man kann sich natürlich bemühen, die Rahmenbedingungen dafür zu schaffen. Wir haben auch so weit wie möglich chronologisch gedreht.

Severin Fiala: Damit die Schauspieler reinwachsen können. Die Kinder und ihre Stiefmutter kennen einander zu Beginn des Films ja nicht gut. Und damit sie diese Beziehung gemeinsam entwickeln können, haben wir uns dafür entschieden, chronologisch zu drehen. Das ist natürlich in puncto Produktionsbedingungen das ungünstigste und schwachsinnigste, was man tun kann. Das ist ineffizient. Wir glauben aber, dass ein chronologisches Drehen hier die schauspielerische Leistung besser gemacht hat.

Die Dreharbeiten fanden ja in Kanada statt. Warum fiel die Wahl auf diese Hütte? Was waren eure Wunschvorstellungen, was war vor Ort besonders schwierig umsetzbar?

Severin Fiala: Wir sind immer dafür, möglichst viel Echtes und Reales zu nehmen, weil wir glauben, dass das den Film bereichert. Wir wollten also eine Original-Location, die isoliert und von innen und außen bespielbar ist. Die Schauspieler sollen kein Set betreten, sondern einen realen Ort. Dann ist es so, dass kein realer Ort dem entspricht, was man sich vorgestellt hat. Das kann einen Film aber auch bereichern, denn der Ort verändert den finalen Film. Das heißt in diesem Fall: Das Haus beeinflusst, in welche Richtung der Film geht, wie er sich anfühlen wird. Ist es eine windschiefe, kleine Hütte mit nur einem Raum oder ein großes Haus mit verwinkelten Gängen und Aufzügen? Das war eine sehr schwierige Entscheidung.

Veronika Franz: Aber auch da arbeiten wir mit dem, was wir haben und ändern dementsprechend das Drehbuch. Die Hütte, die wir letztendlich ausgewählt haben, hatte beispielsweise einen wunderbaren Dachboden, wir hatten aber gar keine Szene auf einem Dachboden im Drehbuch. Als wir die Hütte dann gefunden haben, haben wir einige Szenen dementsprechend umgeschrieben. Aber man adaptiert die Location natürlich auch, man stattet es so aus, wie man es für den Film benötigt.

Severin Fiala: Wenn man sich schon für einen realen Ort entscheidet, muss man sich auch fragen: Was sind die Stärken dieses Ortes?

Veronika Franz: Es ist wie mit Schauspielern. Und wir gehen da sehr intuitiv vor. THE LODGE hat uns bestärkt, auf unser Bauchgefühl zu hören in Sachen Schauspieler und Locations. Man muss die Stärken und Schwächen kennen und dann damit arbeiten.

Weitere wichtige Themen sind in THE LODGE, wie auch schon in ICH SEH ICH SEH, psychologische Probleme, die Kind-Stiefmutter-Beziehung und natürlich Religiosität. Allein der Name „Grace“ der Hauptdarstellerin spiegelt das wider. Was ist da die Faszination für Sie?

Veronika Franz: Wir glauben, wir können Themen, die uns interessieren, intensivieren, indem wir sie auf Dreier- oder Vierer-Beziehungen reduzieren.

Severin Fiala: In Familienkonstellationen sind die Beziehungen untereinander auch relativ klar und Zuschauer können sie nachempfinden.

Veronika Franz: Der Zugang ist leicht. Und die Skelettierung dessen, worum es geht, fällt leichter.

Severin Fiala: Jeder kennt die Idealvorstellung einer Familie. Und wenn da etwas nicht richtig läuft, versteht man das relativ schnell.

Veronika Franz: Bei uns geht es oft um Trauma und Kommunikation, auch um Masken, unter denen man sich versteckt. Das Verdrängen und Vergraben der Vergangenheit. Deutsche kommunizieren emotionsloser und geradliniger. Österreicher dagegen eher mit viel Humor, hintergründiger, sie benennen Dinge nicht klar. Da gibt es oft viel, was man begräbt, was dann aber irgendwann wiederaufersteht.

Severin Fiala: Aber die Überwindung von Traumata ist auch speziell bei THE LODGE ein Thema. Da ist die Frage: Wie tut man das, wie teilt man sich anderen Leuten mit oder eben auch nicht?

Veronika Franz: Wenn du fragst, wieso das Thema so interessant für uns ist: Natürlich, weil es jeden betrifft. Ein Amerikaner hat eine Pressevorführung gesehen und sagte dann, man sehe dem Film an, dass er europäisch ist, aber trotzdem thematisch amerikanisch anmutet. Es ist nun einmal kein geradliniger Horrorfilm wie jeder andere.

Definitiv! Abschließend noch die Frage: Welche Erfahrungen und Lehren ziehen Sie aus der Produktion von THE LODGE für ihre weiteren Projekte?

Severin Fiala: Wir haben wahnsinnig viel gelernt. Gerade, mit Frankokanadiern zu drehen, die eine eigene Art haben, zu kommunizieren und zu arbeiten, war neu. Das System, wie dort Filme gemacht werden, ist zu Beginn kompliziert zu durchschauen und etwas behäbiger. Viele Missverständnisse, die es auf dieser Ebene bei THE LODGE gab, werden so das nächste Mal sicherlich nicht mehr passieren.


https://www.blairwitch.de/news/the-lodge-interview-veronika-franz-and-severin-fiala-98707/

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BeitragVerfasst: 09.02.2020, 00:13 
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Einiges rund um die Entstehung von 'The Lodge':

Zitat:
Horrorfilm

Die Hollywood das Fürchten lehren


Veronika Franz und Severin Fiala haben mit ihrem Horrorkino vor allem in den USA Erfolg. Jetzt kommt der neue Schocker des österreichischen Regie-Duos, "The Lodge", auch in unsere Kinos.

vom 04.02.2020, 15:54 Uhr | Update: 05.02.2020, 18:44 Uhr


Mit ihrer entrischen Genre-Übung "Ich seh ich seh", ein sparsam inszenierter Horrorfilm, sowohl budgetmäßig als auch im Bereich der Effekte, wurden Veronika Franz und Severin Fiala 2014 sozusagen über Nacht zu den Stars einer Horrorfilm-Fangemeinde, die den Film weltweit bejubelte und ihn bis heute verehrt. Damals feierte die Arthaus-Horrorgeschichte rund um Zwillingsbuben, die an der Identität ihrer Mutter zweifeln, seit diese mit Kopfverband aus dem Krankenhaus zurückgekehrt ist, auch umjubelte Premieren bei den Filmfestivals in Venedig und Toronto - was nicht folgenlos blieb für das Regie-Duo Franz und Fiala. Zumal im Vorfeld schon der unheimliche Trailer zu "Goodnight Mommy" (so lautete der englische Titel) auf YouTube hunderttausende Male angesehen wurde und bei so manchem Executive in den Hollywood-Studios für Aufsehen sorgte.

Sechs Jahre später hat das Duo nicht nur einen neuen Spielfilm abgedreht, sondern jettet gerade von Termin zu Termin in den USA. 2019 wurde ihr neuer Horrorfilm "The Lodge" beim renommierten Sundance Filmfestival in Park City, Utah, der Öffentlichkeit vorgestellt, diese Woche sind Franz und Fiala in Los Angeles bei etlichen Preview Screenings zugegen. Und auch einen eigenen Agenten hat das Duo bereits, in einem eher schmucklosen Gebäude in L.A., "nicht gerade mit rotem Teppich davor", wie Franz auf ihrem Facebook-Account postete.

Auf den Spuren eines Mythos

Franz und Fiala lernen zurzeit den Mythos Hollywood von innen kennen, und dass dieser vom Glamour der Awards-Shows und Filmfestivals weit entfernt liegt, weiß jeder Laie; schließlich will in Hollywood zuallererst Geld verdient werden, denn von der Filmkunst kann schließlich niemand leben. Unter Hollywoods Voraussetzungen wäre ein Filmdebüt wie "Ich seh ich seh" also auf gar keinen Fall zustande gekommen.

Für "The Lodge", ihren ersten Hollywood-Spielfilm, musste das Duo darob auch mit vielen Einschränkungen und Limitierungen kämpfen. So hatten Franz und Fiala nur eingeschränkt darauf Einfluss, mit welchen Schauspielern sie den Film besetzen konnten, und auch beim Schnitt mischte sich - wie in Hollywood üblich - das Studio ein. Ein an sich normaler Vorgang, weil es diesen Filmfabriken darum geht, das Produkt Film bis zum Kinostart ständig zu optimieren. Künstlerische Freiheit sieht hingegen anders aus. "In Hollywood haben wir gelernt, wie man dabei bleibt: Nämlich, indem man möglichst viele Eisen im Feuer hat, weil man nie weiß, welches etwas wird", sagte Severin Fiala in einem Radiointerview mit fm4. "Es funktioniert dort so, dass alles entweder ganz schnell gehen muss oder nie." Und dass das Mitspracherecht der Regisseure oft auf der Strecke bleibt, wenn man nicht gerade Martin Scorsese heißt oder für Netflix dreht.

Alles für das Publikum

Wobei: Serien wären für Franz und Fiala durchaus eine Versuchung, wie Fiala bestätigt. Und: Derzeit würden Drehbuchautoren aus Großbritannien und den USA an Scripten für die beiden arbeiten, die Projektlage ist vage, aber durchaus vielgestaltig. Die Devise lautet: Erst einmal abwarten, wie "The Lodge" beim Publikum ankommt, denn auch das ist so ein Indikator für eine Hollywood-Laufbahn: ohne Publikum keine Karriere.

"The Lodge" läuft diese Woche auch in den österreichischen Kinos an. Die Konstellation ist ähnlich wie bei "Ich seh ich seh": Eine Frau und zwei Kinder zusammen in einem Haus, und das Gruseln kann losgehen. Diesmal aber handelt es sich um die beiden Geschwister Mia (Lia McHugh) und Aiden (Jaeden Martell), die zusammen mit ihrem Vater Richard (Richard Armitage) und dessen neuer Freundin Grace (Riley Keough) über Weihnachten in eine abgelegene Hütte fahren. Dort sollen die Kinder Grace besser kennenlernen, denn erst kurz zuvor hatte Richard die Frau und Mutter seiner Kinder für Grace verlassen, was der Nachwuchs gar nicht goutierte. Als Daddy für zwei Tage jobmäßig zurück in die Stadt muss, nimmt das Unheil seinen Lauf. Die Kids finden nämlich heraus, dass Grace einst bei einer christlichen Sekte gewesen ist, die kollektiv Massenselbstmord verübt hat. Nur Grace hat damals überlebt.

Trotz der Eingriffe, die die produzierenden und legendären "Hammer Films" zweifelsohne bei "The Lodge" vorgenommen haben, bleibt doch die Handschrift des österreichischen Grusel-Duos erkennbar, die sich vor allem durch Subtilität hervortut. Gemeinsam mit den Bildern von Yorgos Lanthimos’ Stammkameramann Thimios Bakatakis gelingt dem Duo ein entrisches Gesamtkonzept der Ungemütlichkeit, das den gesamten Film durchzieht. Diese unheimliche Grundstimmung hat Kultcharakter, dieses sparsame Vermessen von Atmosphäre wirkt nachhaltiger als viele anderen Schocker, die mehr auf Effekte setzen denn auf Dramaturgie und Stimmung. Der Horror, er liegt bei Veronika Franz und Severin Fiala meistens im Detail.

Rückkehr ins Waldviertel

Trotz der internationalen Aufmerksamkeit für die beiden Horrorfilme und trotz etlicher "Eisen im Feuer" wird das Duo seinen nächsten Film nicht in den USA drehen, sondern daheim im Waldviertel. In dem als "historischer Spielfilm" angekündigten "Des Teufels Bad" geht es um Frauen, Religion und Ritualmorde: Im Oberösterreich des 18. Jahrhunderts wird ein kleines Kind von der Mutter ermordet, die Mutter stellt sich. Sie will für ihr Verbrechen hingerichtet werden. Und sie ist kein Einzelfall. Der Film behandle ein "bisher unbeleuchtetes Kapitel europäischer Geschichte", sagt Franz. Anhand des Projekts wird auch die Wurzel von Franz’ und Fialas Erfolg sichtbar: Beide arbeiten quasi wie ein Familienbetrieb unter der Produktion von Ulrich Seidl zusammen. Seidl ist Franz’ Ehemann und Fialas Onkel.

Zusammen hat das Trio noch einige Projekte im Köcher, zum Beispiel einen ORF-Landkrimi, den ebenfalls Franz und Fiala schreiben und inszenieren werden. Franz arbeitet mit Seidl an Dokumentarfilmprojekten über Alkoholräusche, Flucht-Bewegungen und "schwarzen" Tourismus, mit "Untertauchen" listet Ulrich Seidls Filmproduktionsfirma ein weiteres Spielfilmprojekt von Franz und Fiala, die zudem auch am Drehbuch zu Seidls Langzeit-Projekt über den gefürchteten Einbrecher, Räuber und Totschläger Johann Georg Grasel (1790-1818) aus dem Waldviertel mitwirken. Selbst, wenn aus der zurzeit verheißungsvollen Hollywood-Karriere des Horror-Duos nichts werden sollte: Langweilig wird Franz und Fiala bestimmt nicht.


https://www.wienerzeitung.at/nachrichten/kultur/film/2048657-Die-Hollywood-das-Fuerchten-lehren.html

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