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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 13:25 
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LucasThorin hat geschrieben:
gibt es jetzt einen neuen Thread zwischen PressReview und Ende Juli ??? :scratch: :scratch: :scratch:

Bitte sehr.

Übrigens darf hier jede gern selbst Threads erstellen.

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Verfasst: 05.07.2014, 13:25 


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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 14:01 
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Ja, wollte ich ja, war mir aber nicht so sicher :grins: ... ob nun die komplette Zeit nach der PressNight oder nur bis Ende Juli :scratch: und dann monatlich ... danke für den neuen Thread... :blum:

hier einige Bilder von gestern....

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 14:04 
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LucasThorin hat geschrieben:
Ja, wollte ich ja, war mir aber nicht so sicher :grins: ... ob nun die komplette Zeit nach der PressNight oder nur bis Ende Juli :scratch: und dann monatlich ...

Das wird sich - je nach Bedarf - zeigen. Mal sehen, ob und wann sich Ermüdungserscheinungen zeigen.

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 15:38 
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Danke für die Bilder, LucasThorin! :blum:

Hast du auch die Fundquellen für uns? :please:

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 16:37 
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Hier noch ein Bericht einer Bloggerin, die gleich drei Theaterstücke gesehen hat, Monty Python, Richard III. und The Crucible:
http://parismarisamadonna.typepad.com/b ... kthen.html

Zitat:
07/05/2014
#Backthen
This week I was reminded of how much I love living in London.

This week, I saw three shows.

This week, I saw one show that made me feel tremendously uncomfortable, one that made me wretch and another that made me want to tear off my clothes and launch myself at the lead actor. Sadly, the uncomfortable one is the one that I’m still thinking about.

Monty Python, synonymous with all that is both Funny and British, are now 5 men, all of who qualified decades ago for the old age pension. Strapped for cash, yes really, they’ve reunited for a handful of shows in London, shows that will net them enough income to recline in a Bora Bora bungalow until they expire, pass on, slip from this mortal coil, until they, like their famous parrot, die.

The show was funny; they did You Were Lucky, Palin sang The Lumberjack Song, they did the Spanish Inquisition and they stifled giggles when they did The Dead Parrot. They gathered in white tuxedos for the finale and sang Bright Side of Life. When all 5 were on stage in was obvious how much more Palin seemed to enjoy it than either Jones or Cleese, both of whom might have preferred to stay indoors and watch the tennis with a sherry. But seeing them dance about with 15 women in lace negligees made me feel uncomfortable. Seeing them dance about with 15 women in French Maid tunics fitted with exposed plastic breasts made me vomit a little bit in my throat. #pervyoldmen

Worried that I might be prematurely transforming into a pearl clutcher, or worse still, a Liberal voter, I’ve since shared my concerns with a few friends. Some think I should lighten up, most responded with something along the lines of… that was how Monty Python was back then.

Back then, Benny Hill used to run after naked Page 3 Girls giggling and groping like an adolescent with his first erection. Back then, students forced each other to perform sex acts in public to gain admittance to Greek societies. Back then, teachers chastised pupils with a bamboo rod or a wooden ruler. Back then, women were the property of their husbands to dispose of as they wished. Back then, bosses chain-smoked at their desks and slapped the exposed thighs of their underpaid secretaries. Back then, homes were insulated with asbestos, tomatoes thrived under DDT showers and cars spewed the fumes of leaded petrol into the acid rain. Back then…

Sorry, but if I can’t realistically expect a marriage proposal from a gentilhomme wearing a redingote, britches and a black silk top hat, I can’t buy into the idea that what went on back then is relevant today. If I am not allowed to wear a bonnet, if I am not allowed to smoke wherever the f*ck I like, if I have to work for a living, if I can’t play croquet, or sew, or paint, or dry flowers, then I’m telling you that plastic boobs on a 20 year old dancing around a man who could be her grandfather is not cool, not here and now.

The crowd who went along to see Monty Python were a pretty mixed bag, but overwhelmingly comprised of Baby Boomers who’d made the expensive trip into town to relive their Thatcher-y youth. I’ve no doubt that for them, my father’s generation, the peep show that interspersed the absurdist humour was entirely appropriate, was a bit naughty^, was even a bit funny. For me, in light of the trial that was unravelling at the Crown Court down the road and the viral video of a young woman blowing 24 men in Magaluf, it felt more than anachronistic, it felt more than uncomfortable, it felt wrong.

I would not have been offended if the 15 negligée’d women were accompanied by 15 men wearing nothing but swimming trunks, but they weren’t. I would not have been offended if the 15 plastic-boobed women were partnered with 15 plastic-penised men, but alas, the men were wearing three-piece suits. I also think that between them, Jones, Gilliam, Cleese, Palin and Idle are among the funniest humans that have ever walked this earth. If they’d just sat down on the loo for 5 minutes and jotted their immediate, unedited thoughts, it would likely have been funnier than plastic breasts.

But thank my lucky sky full of stars*, this week, I saw two other plays.

Weighed down heavily with jetlag and barely able to keep my lids from closing, my eyeballs were treated to the delights of two Richards sharing Tolkien and rather dashing beards.

Richard III, starring the Hobbit, was a steamy, sweaty summer evening spent watching a rather small man play an evil genius in the very intimate (read, suffocating) Trafalgar Studios. I was so hot I thought I might have to strip and run into the stage, but The Critique was sitting beside me and I was wearing lace-up shoes. You might remember Martin Freeman as the naked guy in Love Actually or you may know him best as his current incarnation, the guy who makes Cumberbatch look even sexier in Sherlock. Whatever you like really, I’d never seen Richard III, it is gory and violent, it is a history, my least preferred of Shakespeare’s three genres, but this show was wonderful. Made all the more so by the appearance of the excellent Gina McKee as Elizabeth and the array of Tom Selleck-y moustaches. The play was set in the 70’s.

Unfortunately, as good as that Richard was, the other was a triumph. The Hobbit’s taller mate, Thorin Oakenshield, was getting all John Procter over at the Old Vic and I had been waiting impatiently for months to see Richard Armitage writhe in torment and regret. He gurned, he strutted, he screamed, he lifted an entire woman of the ground like she was a bag of potatoes and he cried bloody murder as the Christians played out their witch-hunt around him. He was extraordinary, the play is exceptional, I was transfixed for three hours and barely noticed when he took his shirt off.

Arthur Miller wrote The Crucible in 1953. He wrote it as an allegory for McCarthyism, he told the story of the 1692 Salem witch-hunts to warn his contemporaries of the dangers of a pack mentality and cash powered media. Arthur Miller used a back then story back then which, when played today, was entirely relevant, entirely entertaining…no plastic boobs required.

^I’ve since learned that the show was choreographed by Arlene Phillips; the woman who created Kenny Everett’s Hot Gossip



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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 19:09 
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Hier mal ein Review eines Literaturprofessors:

http://peterviney.wordpress.com/stage/the-crucible/

Zitat:
The Crucible always had a whiff of GCSE set book about it … Arthur Miller, and strong parallels to be drawn between the Salem witch trials of 1692 and the McCarthy Hollywood witch hunts of the early 1950s. 1692 is an exciting period of American history with a touch of witchcraft and sex. Miller researched it as a parallel to what was happening to his friends and colleagues in Hollywood, went to Salem to research it, and found the story had its own life too. It’s far more than a parallel. You can pull out so many interesting other themes. The fear of the female and “women’s magic.” The fear of what the establishment feel is “magic” (homeopathy? herbal remedies?) or alternative religion (meditation, yoga, Shamanic dance). Mass hysteria. How a bunch of accusations can snowball. Weighted trials. Prurient priests spying on naked girls. All fun. It’s a very teachable and discussable play.

Since the odious Education Secretary Michael Gove (allegedly) interfered to remove most modern and also most American work from the English Lit syllabus singlehanded and against all advice, I suppose it won’t have that set book attachment for long. Pity. It always worked with teenagers. I’d put it with The Great Gatsby and Of Mice and Men as an American work only an idiot could eradicate from school syllabuses. It’s a few years since I’ve seen it. Following on from A View From The Bridge just over the road at the Young Vic a few weeks ago, Miller is alive and well in London SE1. In fact, with Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf in Adrian Noble’s production on at the same time in Bath, and the Almeida running Our Town in the autumn, it’s prime time for 20th Century American Drama 101. If only all four had been running when I was studying it. The 4th of July is a truly appropriate day to see it, just as 23rd April was appropriate for Shakespeare earlier this year. It’s another “unbooked” one. We’re in London for two days for plays at The Globe tomorrow and the day after. We hadn’t decided to travel up on Friday afternoon until late on. We walked from Waterloo to the bus stop by the Old Vic, saw the signs, and wandered in, and said “I feel stupid asking, but I suppose there’s no chance at all of tickets for tonight …” And for the first time in years it was “well, yes, actually …”. And they were extremely good seats too in a full house. That’s happened at the RSC, and I suspect these theatres hold seats in reserve for cast, or high-level patrons and release them after lunch on the actual day.

Not many productions get twin five star reviews from Michael Billington in The Guardian and Charles Spencer in The Telegraph, either. Charles Spencer makes the point that in 2014, the play is just as much a parallel with extreme fundamentalists of today, prepared to slaughter in the name of God. I’d add the parallel fate of prisoners of conscience everywhere. Quentin Letts in the Mail thought it 45 minutes too long. While it runs to three and a half hours including the interval, the play is intrinsically “Shakespeare quality” as well as full Shakespeare length. The time sped by in such a gripping and vigorous production, and it ended with a well-earned instant standing ovation.

This season has the Old Vic in the round for a series. It’s funny how in the round has invaded proscenium theatres recently. Salisbury Playhouse, Trafalgar Studios are doing it too. When a proscenium theatre gets converted, it’s usually best to be on the old auditorium side. Here the conversion is so thorough that it doesn’t matter. They even added much needed extra loos in what used to be the vast, deep stage, and walking in, the theatre space is much narrower than before to accommodate the side seating. This was no nod to the round either. The play really was worked for the tight space and for the multiple entrances, with a subtle lighting plot. I always watch actors in the round to see how naturally they include the whole audience, and this was great direction and blocking.

The costumes were Brechtian homespun generic peasant, plus black for the reverends and judges. It is hard to tie any of it specifically to a time and place, but it looked right. I noticed how when Reverend Hale arrived at the Proctor’s house in Act Two, how Elizabeth Proctor hastened to cover her hair. The women normally had their hair covered with scarves in public … true for the era, but another fundamentalist parallel. The loose pyjamas John Proctor had in the last act, when he was a prisoner, had a touch of Guantanamo Bay in the shape (though not the colour … that reference has been truly overdone in recent years).

The accent of the Salem farmers and servants was Yorkshire-lite. That’s way better than English actors just missing out on American, and in 1692 Massachusetts, I’d assume English regional accents were about standard (the east and rural south would have been more historically accurate given the place names the settlers chose in New England: Boston, Cambridge, Andover). The accents all felt just right though. Deputy Governor Danforth was fierce RP. Richard Armitage, in the lead role as John Proctor, proved again that film stars (Thorin Oakenshield in The Hobbit trilogy) are stars for good reason. He was totally commanding in the role, and unlike the critics in the papers, I liked his voice. So did the audience judging by the acclaim on his final individual bows.

Looking through the programme, it was surprising to see how many of the cast were making their Old Vic debut. Samantha Colley as the self-possessed Queen Bitch, Abigail, and Natalie Gavin as the trembling, terrified Mary Warren both gave first-rate performances. So much so that I expected their CV notes to be laden with RSC, NT and Globe productions. Not at all. First major London theatre roles. The girls worked together as a group, echoing each other in the third courtroom act. This was always a theatre workshop piece for young actors, but here it was done so well by all of them.

Actors we had seen before included Jack Ellis, as a terrifying Deputy Governor Danforth, and Christopher Godwin as the most forbidding, looking down his nose judge. His eyes poured contempt, accusation and disbelief on everyone he deigned to look at, and his background acting was spellbinding as Jack Ellis held forth, embracing the audience in the round in his edicts that no one speak, or give any clue to the accused. The scene where Elizabeth comes on and is questioned while Abigail and John have their backs turned to her is in any case one of Miller’s finest scenes.

William Gaunt was a wonderful Giles Corey, the aging and litigious farmer who inadvertently gets his wife accused for the obviously witchy-woman crime of “reading books a lot.” The pious Puttnams (Harry Atwell and Rebecca Saire) looked physically perfect, just as if they’d arrived on your doorstep during your Sunday morning lie-in, clutching “Watchtower.”

Adrian Schiller as the Reverend Hale has the biggest change in character in the play, from convinced witch-hunter to realization of the enormity of what they have done. Another transfixing performance. Somewhat later, the smarmy Reverend Parrish, played by Michael Thomas, comes round too. I noted that as these characters left the accuser side, they lost their shoes and were barefoot, presumably in penitence. View From The Bridge was barefoot too. The serious critics were both right. It’s an unquestionable five star production, and holds the level in every aspect. The best thing we have seen at the Old Vic since Kevin Spacey’s Richard III too.

PROGRAMME A good extract from Arthur Miller, as well as an essay on Arthur Miller by Christopher Bigsby, Professor of American Studies at East Anglia, who is the leading writer on Miller.


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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 19:30 
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Also mir gefällt das karierte Hemd :daumen: Aber müde sieht er aus :sigh2:

Und ist da tatsächlich jemand mit einem Tablet-Computer unterwegs? Sorry, aber das finde ich einfach nur: Angeber! :thumbsdown: Nur weil größerer Bildschirm macht es keine besseren Bilder. :schlaumeier:
Spoiler: anzeigen
Höchstens als Unterlage für Richard geeignet, wenn er ein Poster unterschreiben soll - aber ohne Soft-Case. ;)

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 19:44 
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Deborah Harkness, Autorin von "Discovery of witches" (All souls trilogy), war auch im Theater:

https://twitter.com/DebHarkness
Zitat:
Deborah Harkness ‏@DebHarkness 12 Min.
@oldvictheatre production of THE CRUCIBLE quite simply stunning. All the reviews are spot on. Extraordinary. Kudos to all.

Fernanda Matias ‏@MatiasFmatias 10 Min.
@DebHarkness @oldvictheatre I had no idea you would be seeing this. Did you get a chance to meet Yael and Richard.?


Deborah HarknessVerifizierter Account
‏@DebHarkness
@MatiasFmatias @oldvictheatre only on stage! I've seen a lot of stagings of this play but this was by far the best. Am still reeling.

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 20:28 
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Ich schreibe das nur als Spoiler für diejenigen, die die Bücher noch nicht gelesen haben. Also falls Ihr Euch überraschen lassen wollt... ;)
Spoiler: anzeigen
Ein Teil ihrer All Souls-Triliogie spielt weitestgehend in Salem oder hat damit zu tun (die Tanten von Diana Bishop wohnen in der Nähe, Sarah und Bridget Bishop sind Vorfahren und ihr Vater heißt mit Nachnamen Proctor), so ist es für mich keine Überraschung, dass Deborah Harkness sich für den Stoff interessiert.


Und mal ehrlich, würden Richard oder DH so früh etwas erzählen, falls Gespräche stattgefunden haben? ;)

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 20:36 
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:scratch: Das versteh ich jetzt nicht. Es ging doch nicht um die Verfilmung ihrer Bücher, sie tweetet doch nur, dass sie von dieser Aufführung begeistert ist. :nix:

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 20:50 
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Arianna hat geschrieben:
:scratch: Das versteh ich jetzt nicht. Es ging doch nicht um die Verfilmung ihrer Bücher, sie tweetet doch nur, dass sie von dieser Aufführung begeistert ist. :nix:

Ich meinte damit diese beiden Tweets:

Zitat:
Fernanda Matias ‏@MatiasFmatias 10 Min.
@DebHarkness @oldvictheatre I had no idea you would be seeing this. Did you get a chance to meet Yael and Richard.?


Deborah HarknessVerifizierter Account
‏@DebHarkness
@MatiasFmatias @oldvictheatre only on stage! I've seen a lot of stagings of this play but this was by far the best. Am still reeling.

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 21:04 
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Ach so, ich hatte die Frage so verstanden, ob sie sie getroffen hätte, um ihnen zur gelungenen Aufführung zu gratulieren. :nix:

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 21:31 
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Ein Review eines männlichen Theatregeeks
Zitat:
Theatre review: The Crucible

Will the critics still shit stars all over the Old Vic once Kevin Spacey leaves? I can't help but wonder after the newspapers heaped praise over Yaël Farber's production of The Crucible. Arthur Miller wrote his play about the Salem witch trials in the wake of McCarthyism, in which he was caught up; but it functions just as well as a metaphor for any mass hysteria in which accusation is treated as the same as guilt in the court of public opinion. In Salem, Massachusetts in 1692, fear of witchcraft is rife. A group of teenage girls are glimpsed dancing naked in the woods, and divert attention from themselves by pinning the blame elsewhere, accusing various local women of being in league with the devil. This escalates quickly into a trial where half the town seems to stand accused, and the only way to avoid hanging is to confess - and give the court another name to go after.

Some months earlier, farmer John Proctor (Richard Armitage) had an affair with his servant, now leader of the accusing girls. On discovering this his wife threw the girl out, and now Abigail (Samantha Colley) wants revenge, including Elizabeth Proctor's (Anna Madeley) name among the accused. John's attempts to save his wife only drag him into danger as well.


"Seriously though, where are you meant to be from?"

Although widely considered to be his masterpiece, I've not got along with The Crucible as well as with other Miller plays in the past. There's moments where it really comes into life and others where it drags, and this is particularly true of Farber's production. Instead of trying to recreate a 17th century New England accent, the cast use Yorkshire accents to highlight the universality of the piece. (Ian was irritated by the constant references to Massachusetts locations in Northern English accents; I didn't mind it, treating it as I would references to Troy or Illyria being relocated in this way.) Soutra Gilmour has used the in-the-round configuration to create an oppressively intimate playing space where everyone is under constant scrutiny. It's particularly effective in the third act, when one of the girls (Natalie Gavin) almost admits to the deception but is bullied into accusing Proctor as well. The abuse of the trials to get rid of people out of revenge or personal profit is almost comically apparent here, and there's a lovely scene where the girls glare at a pair of old men to make them give up their seats for them, their version of doing god's work not looking a million miles away from a group of high school mean girls.


"I don't know dammit! I just don't know what this accent is!"

Armitage certainly has charisma and stage presence but his performance is uneven; his accent travels around a lot without ever quite landing in the same place as the rest of the cast, and he increasingly breaks into a gravelly, raspy growl that had us wondering even by the interval how many 8-show weeks it would take before he loses his voice. More subtle performances steal the show from him, particularly the two men whose initial contributions spiral well out of their control: William Gaunt as Giles Corey, whose off-hand comment about his wife reading books leads to her death, and Adrian Schiller excellent as John Hale, the "expert" minister broken by all the deaths on his hands.


"Well you sound a bit Jane Horrocks at times, maybe you're aiming for Lancashire?"

But for any positives, this production will surely be remembered mostly for its length. The Crucible usually runs at about three hours anyway, but in early previews Farber had managed to drag it out to four. This had significantly improved by tonight but it's still an overlong production, stretched by lengthy, ritualistic silent scene changes which contribute atmosphere early on but as the evening stretches out do nothing but add time and suck out tension. There's also far too many ponderous line readings, nowhere more so than from Madeley, the likes of whose                                                                                                                                                                                        long and                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      meaningless                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   gaps                                                                                                                                                               between                                                                                                                                                                                                        words haven't been heard since Ralph Fiennes played Prospero. It brings me back to the issue of star ratings, and one of the many reasons I don't use them. Five stars, which at least six papers have awarded the production so far, suggest to me that a show couldn't be improved upon, and there's so many ways that I'd disagree in this instance. There's moments when this looks like a perfect production, but for me they're just moments. Unevenly, sometimes lethargically paced, this confuses physically exhausting its audience with emotionally devastating them.

The Crucible by Arthur Miller is booking until the 13th of September at the Old Vic.

Running time: 3 hours 35 minutes including interval.


Posted by nick730 at 23:59


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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 21:47 
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Das heißt dann also doch, dass BloggerINNEN eventuell "vorbelastet" sind? RevStan hatte ihren leichten "crush" für Mr. A. ja offen eingestanden ... ;)
Seine Kritik greift manches auf, was wir auch woanders schon gelesen haben. Es kommt eben vieles zusammen: mag ich das Stück grundsätzlich oder eher nicht? Finde ich es gut, dass vermehrt international bekannte Schauspieler als Zugpferde für Theaterproduktionen engagiert werden? Kann oder will ich mich auf die offensichtlich sphärisch anmutenden Umbauphasen einlassen oder wirken sie einfach nur zäh und ich verweigere mich dieser Entdeckung der Langsamkeit? Er hat ja offensichtlich ein Problem mit dem mangelnden Tempo der Aufführung. :nix:
Ich lese diese unterschiedlichen Reviews mit Interesse - es lebe die Vielfalt!
Danke für's Posten! :blum:

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BeitragVerfasst: 05.07.2014, 21:55 
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Registriert: 23.03.2013, 16:59
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Wohnort: Sachsenländle
Arianna hat geschrieben:
Das heißt dann also doch, dass BloggerINNEN eventuell "vorbelastet" sind? RevStan hatte ihren leichten "crush" für Mr. A. ja offen eingestanden ... ;)


Das kann man so nicht sagen... auch da gibt es Unterschiede, die wir hier auch schon lang und breit in den verschiedenen Reviews zu lesen bekamen. Und nach Männlein und Weiblein würde ich auch nicht trennen... es gibt durchaus auch Damen. die nicht "vorbelastet" sind und sicherlich auch Herren, die RA gern haben. ;)

Ansonsten stimme ich dir aber zu... ich lese die unterschiedlichen Meinungen auch gerne. Welcher ich mich eher anschließe wird sich zeigen.

Danke für's Posten, White Rose! :blum:

_________________
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