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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:14 
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The exception is their leader, Thorin, and the formerly little-known actor who plays him, Armitage, who emerges as perhaps the dominant actor in this very large ensemble.


:daumen:

Und weiter geht's:

http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/12/01/ ... ies-review

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Instead, The Battle of the Five Armies is very much Thorin Oakenshield’s story, and he’s a changed dwarf at the start of this instalment. The reclamation of his ancestor’s gold has stirred ‘Dragon Sickness’ in his warrior heart, with greed poisoning the dwarf’s head so that he loses sight of all that’s noble and good.
Thorin becomes obsessed with finding the highly valued ‘Arkenstone’, which he believes to be somewhere in the Lonely Mountain. And so the Company of Dwarves barricade themselves within as they search for the gem, giving the group little to do in this outing, and infuriating both the elves and the people of Lake-town, both of whom believe they are owed a share of the treasure.


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And once again Richard Armitage is a powerful presence, with Thorin’s journey both touching and heartbreaking.

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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:28 
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There is no shortage of magic in Peter Jackson’s epic and emotional Middle-earth masterpiece.

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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:31 
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The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Review

Chris Tilly
The Circle is Complete

December 1, 2014
It started with an Unexpected Journey that was supposed to take Bilbo Baggins on an adventure There and Back Again. But a creative – or financial – decision was made that meant Bilbo’s expedition instead led to The Desolation of Smaug, and finally, to this moment: The Battle of the Five Armies.

It’s been a monumental effort by co-writer and director Peter Jackson, making his own unexpected return to Middle-earth to finish what he started some 16-years-ago. And this final film may be his biggest challenge yet as it has to succeed on three distinct fronts – as the finale to one trilogy, as the connective tissue to another, and as an entertaining effort in its own right. Ambitious doesn’t begin to cover it.

The film commences in brilliant or bizarre fashion, depending on your opinion of the limited source material being divided into three lengthy movies.

“What have we done?” exclaimed Bilbo during The Desolation of Smaug’s climax. The dwarves took down the fire-breathing dragon and re-claimed their gold. But they failed to kill the beast,
Chris Tilly Says


The Battle of the Five Armies, therefore, kicks off with a truly spectacular set-piece, the beautifully-rendered creature swooping over and around the island raining flames on all below. The Master of Lake-town (Stephen Fry) flees in fear, while Bard the Bowman (Luke Evans) steps into the fray, climbing a watchtower and firing his every arrow at Smaug in a desperate attempt to save his people.

It's a stunning pre-credit sequence, but feels more like the end of the last movie than the beginning of this one, lending the film a very strange kind of imbalance from the off.

Proceedings then briefly calm down, as we observe the relationship between dwarf Kili (Aidan Turner) and elf Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly) develop, and witness Bard become more King-like as he takes charge of what’s left of his town. The cowardly Alfrid (Ryan Gage) even contributes some light relief as he endeavors to worm his way into Bard’s good graces. But that’s largely it for comedy this time around, with both the stakes higher and the tone graver as the journey nears its end.

There are still loose ends to be tied up from the previous film, however, most notably Gandalf's plight, the wizard having been imprisoned by Sauron at the ruined fortress of Dol Guldur. It’s an opportunity to glimpse the terrifying extent of Galadriel’s power, as the White Council spring into action and the Lady of Lothlorien kicks all kinds of ass, ably supported by Elrond and a splendidly sprightly Sauruman.

But what of Bilbo Baggins, the Hobbit at the heart of this tale? Although he plays a pivotal role in the book’s final third – committing an incredibly brave act of defiance – it’s also quite a small one. Instead, The Battle of the Five Armies is very much Thorin Oakenshield’s story, and he’s a changed dwarf at the start of this instalment. The reclamation of his ancestor’s gold has stirred ‘Dragon Sickness’ in his warrior heart, with greed poisoning the dwarf’s head so that he loses sight of all that’s noble and good.

Thorin becomes obsessed with finding the highly valued ‘Arkenstone’, which he believes to be somewhere in the Lonely Mountain. And so the Company of Dwarves barricade themselves within as they search for the gem, giving the group little to do in this outing, and infuriating both the elves and the people of Lake-town, both of whom believe they are owed a share of the treasure.

The scene is set for the three parties to wage war with each other, but this being The Battle of the Five Armies, they’re a little low on numbers, forcing Jackson and fellow screenwriters Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens (as well as Guillermo Del Toro) to painstakingly and sometimes rather tediously maneuver all the pieces into place so said confrontation can commence.

It’s worth the wait however, the battle featuring the kind of large-scale conflict that Jackson is so good at staging. Not for him shaky camerawork and confusing quick-fire cuts – Jackson carefully sets out the geography of the battle-ground then guides you through it, as man, dwarf and elf confront hordes of Orcs, who in turn are aided and abetted by several beasts of war, including giant bats and gargantuan worms.

Trouble is, it all gets a little CGI-heavy, with the film at times looking less like live-action and more like animation. This issue is most notable during the arrival of Dwarf General Dwain Underfoot – played with characteristic gusto by Billy Connolly. Sporting a ginger Mohawk and delivering Glasweigan kisses as he rides into battle atop a huge boar, he’s a larger-than-life character, but fights in such a blur of superhuman speed that it’s hard to believe he’s flesh and blood. Legolas is similarly over-animated during a couple of brawls, while fully computer-generated Orcs Azog and Bolg seldom convince, which is a problem when they are ultimately the villains of the piece.

The escalation of war is certainly impressive, while Jackson ensures that there are small, personal altercations so that each character gets their moment to shine. But the fighting is relentless and lasts for what feels like an age, with battle fatigue eventually setting in as much for the audience as it does the troops.

Jackson knows what he’s doing in these situations though, the war climaxing on a powerful and poignant note; one that’s not about great armies battering each other, but rather friendship, loyalty, and the bond that formed between 13 dwarves, a wizard and a hobbit at the start of this tale.

Predictably the film then segues into multiple endings, but mercifully not as many as those that marred the finale of The Return of the King. There’s a slightly jarring tonal shift, and some somewhat clumsy forewarnings of the darkness to come. But overall it’s a satisfying and ultimately moving ending to this trilogy.

As a standalone feature Battle of the Five Armies has its fair share of shortcomings however, most conspicuously the fact that the film’s most impressive sequence is that opening salvo, with Smaug casting his sizable shadow over the rest of proceedings. But there’s also a little too much filler that seems designed to pad things out, so much so that at times it feels like characters are being reintroduced simply so they can then be bid farewell.

As ever, Martin Freeman delivers a masterclass in understatement as Bilbo, so much so that you wish the character spent more time onscreen. And once again Richard Armitage is a powerful presence, with Thorin’s journey both touching and heartbreaking.

But their combined efforts can’t quite elevate the movie, with Battle of the Five Armies an impressive achievement when taken as the bridge in a six-film series, but somewhat less successful as a stand-alone feature, with the best material either having gone before, or yet to come.

The Verdict

There’s a little too much padding in the final Hobbit flick, and the best sequence is without doubt the film’s first. But the central battle is indeed spectacular, and as ‘The Age of Orc’ approaches, it rounds out this particular story in stirring and emotional fashion.


http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/12/01/the-hobbit-the-battle-of-the-five-armies-review

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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:33 
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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:37 
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Analysis:
To say that the previous installment of Peter Jackson’s three-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit” left things open-ended would be an understatement, since literally all the characters were left in a place of peril. Fortunately, the main cliffhanger of the dragon Smaug leaving his cave after being holed up there for decades with the intention of attacking Lake Town is resolved in the first 15 minutes of the movie, leaving a void for others to take over the former dwarf’s mountain home.

Therein lies the main conflict at the center of the last act, because the dwarf king Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) made promises to the humans of Lake Town to give them their share of the gold within the mountain and after Smaug destroys their home, they can use the money. The elves have their own treasures lost to Smaug that they want back while Sauron wants the Lonely Mountain for its strategic location in his plans to dominate Middle-earth.

Luke Evans’ Bard is probably the real hero of the third film, trying to protect and save the people of Lake Town, and he makes a good counterpart to Thorin, who has been corrupted by the power and wealth he’s gained with Smaug’s departure. With so much focus on others, that leaves little room for Martin Freeman’s Bilbo Baggins i.e. that hobbit in the title who is caught in the middle of trying to calm everyone down before it leads to war.

As one might expect from the title, it does lead to a giant battle, but unlike “The Return of the King,” this isn’t just an hour of war between thousands of CG extras, but also a number of smaller one-on-one battles that offer a satisfying resolution to the loose ends created by the previous two films. The romance between she-elf Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly) and the dashing dwarf Kili (Aidan Turner) still provides the emotional core for the movie with the lovelorn Legolas (Orlando Bloom) providing some of the money shot action moments, but there aren’t nearly as many fun bits in the finale as in “The Desolation of Smaug,” although we do get a great sequence with Cate Blanchett, Hugo Weaving and Christopher Lee as their characters from “The Lord of the Rings.”

It’s likely that Tolkien purists will continue to be annoyed by the screen time given to characters that never existed in the original book and the amount of subplots that adds to the mix. Jackson’s decision to extend the single story into a trilogy ultimately does pay off, though.

As with the previous Tolkien films, there’s a certain amount of suspension of disbelief required, although if you’re already in for the penny, then you’re probably already in for the pound. If you accept an elf on a reindeer and a dwarf riding a large pig into battle, then surely you’ll buy the long-horned goats that magically appear to transport our dwarves into the final battle. Some of the larger CG creatures don’t offer the same visual gratification of those in “The Lord of the Rings,” as they seem to be fairly derivative by comparison.

As with “The Return of the King,” Jackson doesn’t seem to know quite where to end the film except to create a forced tie-in to the opening of “The Lord of the Rings,” driving home the point that this is very meant to be a prequel to what is ultimately a far superior trilogy. (A less-than-veiled reference to Aragorn feels so forced and unnecessary, it will elicit more than a few groans.)

The Bottom Line:
Minor issues aside, this is another grand spectacle that does a fine job wrapping things up without offering nearly as many of the memorable moments of its predecessor… or “The Lord of the Rings” as a whole.

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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:37 
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Zitat:
The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies

The Forces Awaken


Plot
Smaug the dragon has risen from his slumber and been unleashed upon an unsuspecting Laketown, leaving his vast hoard up for grabs. Drawn by ancient grudges and the promise of gold by the tonne, a quintet of mighty armies descend on the dwarven city of Erebor to battle it out for wealth, power and the fate of Middle-earth.


Review
The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies
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“So began a battle that none had expected; and it was called the Battle of Five Armies, and it was very terrible.” A spinner of epic tales he may have been, but when it came to The Hobbit’s climactic engagement, Tolkien wasn’t much for showmanship. The same cannot be said of Peter Jackson, thankfully, who here concludes his six-part Middle-earth saga by transforming a few pages of J.R.R. afterthought into a thunderous melee of interracial warfare.

Having navigated the barrels, spiders, riddles and ruins, it’s the chance to realise this gigantic, five-way battle royale that clearly prompted Jackson’s return to Tolkien’s world. So much so, in fact, that most other material falls by the wayside. Smaug is unleashed and dispatched in a fleeting ten minutes, his brief but spectacular reign of fire cut short by a monologue-stopping arrow. Likewise the rising menace of Sauron is skipped past with startling alacrity to make way for the main event.

Pelennor Fields was a noble struggle between light and darkness, observed from on high amidst the spires of Minas Tirith. This, by contrast, is a dirty barroom brawl; every hack, stab and gouge felt physically from deep within the scrum. From the moment elven warriors vault the dwarven phalanx to eviscerate onrushing orcs, the Bad Taste director revels in carnage with gleeful invention. Trolls act as mobile siege engines, ballistas raining death from their shoulders, walls collapsing before bipedal battering rams. A raging, elk-mounted Thranduil (Lee Pace) deals antler-assisted decapitation, while dwarven firebrand Bain (a bafflingly CG Billy Connolly) spouts expletives from the back of an armoured war pig. When Thorin (Richard Armitage) finally leads the charge from the gates of Erebor, the glorious rush of battle met is triumphant euphoria.

As both hero and antagonist at various points, this is in large part Armitage’s film. Thorin’s descent into madness under the dragon’s taint is played out with maniacal intensity. His grim rebuff of Luke Evans’ diplomatic overtures (the exchange framed beautifully by a hole in Erebor’s barricade) and final, hallucinatory epiphany upon a floor of burnished gold are as masterfully shot as they are powerfully delivered. Bilbo, by contrast, is a portrait of quiet understatement. Freeman has grown into the part like a second skin, his warmth and honestly underpinning the hobbit’s self-effacing befuddlement. It’s not until the end, with the film’s most effective piece of foreshadowing, that we see cracks in his character as the Ring exerts its influence.

At under two-and-a-half hours, there’s little flab on Five Armies. Jackson has been judicious with the edit, jettisoning anything not essential to the tale at hand. It’s smart work and the film never drags but it doesn’t come without cost. What could have been the stand-out set-piece is largely squandered, Elrond and Saruman facing off against the Nazgul in a spectacular but upsettingly short-lived altercation at Dol Guldur. It’s a minor disappointment in an otherwise gratifying conclusion, though, and one that may yet be addressed. With the numerous threads left unresolved (Legolas’ pursuit of Bolg at Smaug’s finale is abandoned entirely) and key appearances truncated (Beorn’s return lasts a single shot), we can look forward to the certainty of a far weightier Extended Edition this time next year.


Verdict
A fitting conclusion to Jackson’s prequel trilogy and a triumphant adieu to Middle-earth. Now complete, The Hobbit stands as a worthy successor to The Lord Of The Rings, albeit one that never quite emerges from its shadow. Jackson has crafted a grand old tale to do Tolkien proud, and with a single, simple bow in the final moments, one that offers a far cleaner send-off than Return Of The King ever did.

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Zuletzt geändert von Oaky am 02.12.2014, 00:39, insgesamt 2-mal geändert.

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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:38 
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There should be no such thing as a third Hobbit film. The decision to split JRR Tolkien's slimline children's novel into three Lord of the Rings-sized instalments, supplemented by material from appendices, has already been debated to death, but it's more relevant than ever in discussing Peter Jackson's sixth and apparently final Middle Earth chapter, which bears the scars of adaptation more plainly than either of its predecessors.

The Battle of the Five Armies is an alternately thrilling and frustrating sendoff for the series, its spectacular, character-driven action undermined by muddled subplots and a cobbled-together quality that fades away by the stellar third act.

It's the leanest of the three films at a modest 144 minutes, and lands us straight in the thick of the fiery action as the newly unleashed dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch) lays waste to nearby Laketown. Left behind in the dragon's lair are Martin Freeman's hobbit-out-of-water Bilbo and his band of dwarf companions, whose leader Thorin (Richard Armitage) is succumbing to greed and paranoia under the influence of Smaug's treasure.
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
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This is not only the end of The Hobbit on screen, but the end of The Lord of the Rings, and co-writers Jackson, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens weave in several nostalgic references that reiterate the films' "by fans, for fans" spirit – an unexpected and lovely callout to one beloved Rings character will leave many beaming through the finale.

More substantially, there are plot elements here that serve directly as setup for the trilogy to come, with Gandalf (Ian McKellen), Galadriel (Cate Blanchett) and a few other familiar faces trying in vain to prevent a shadowy evil from rising. The sequence that emerges is a genuinely creepy early highlight, giving Blanchett the chance to play new, more vulnerable aspects of her ethereal elf queen.

Bilbo and Thorin's increasingly fraught and intimate relationship stands head and shoulders above everything else, Freeman and Armitage both doing their most wrenching work in the series yet.

But while the gap towards Rings is bridged well, the character continuity from the previous film is strangely wobbly. There's next to no follow-through on the One Ring and its psychological hold on Bilbo, which was introduced so well in last year's moodier Desolation of Smaug. There's a sizeable missed opportunity to parallel Bilbo and Thorin being respectively corrupted by gold, considering where Ian Holm's older Bilbo ends up, but here he's wholly the earnest, affable counterpoint to Thorin's darkness.

Nonetheless, it's Bilbo and Thorin's increasingly fraught and intimate relationship that stands head and shoulders above everything else in The Battle of the Five Armies, Freeman and Armitage both doing their most wrenching work in the series yet. There's no standout sequence here to rival either Bilbo and Gollum's game of riddles from An Unexpected Journey, or Bilbo and Smaug's showdown from Desolation, but instead we get the utterly compelling, quasi-Shakespearean tragedy of Thorin's arc.

A character who suffers far more in transit from the previous film is Evangeline Lilly's Tauriel, whose interspecies love triangle with Kili (Aidan Turner) and Legolas (Orlando Bloom) remains both central and unengaging. As plainly well-intentioned as her character's creation was – a bid to bring some balance to Tolkien's male-driven universe – it's wrong-headed to introduce a fierce female elf warrior whose entire narrative purpose is to be caught between two men and discover that love hurts.

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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 00:40 
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Zitat:
All's well that ends well as Peter Jackson rousingly brings down the curtain on his uneven but laudable 'Lord of the Rings' prequel.

Scott Foundas
Chief Film Critic
@foundasonfilm
This is the way “The Hobbit” ends: not with a whimper, but with an epic battle royale. True to its subtitle, “The Battle of the Five Armies” (revised from the initially more pacific “There and Back Again”), the final installment of Peter Jackson’s distended “Lord of the Rings” prequel offers more barbarians at the gate than you can shake an Elven sword at, each vying for control of mountainous Erebor. The result is at once the trilogy’s most engrossing episode, its most expeditious (at a comparatively lean 144 minutes) and also its darkest — both visually and in terms of the forces that stir in the hearts of men, dwarves and orcs alike. Only fans need apply, but judging from past precedent, there are more than enough of them to ensure that “Battle” walks off with the dragon’s share of the upcoming holiday-season box office.

“Third time pays for all,” the hobbit Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) is fond of saying in Tolkien’s novel, and much the same might be said of the “Hobbit” films themselves. After getting things off to a sluggish start with 2012’s “An Unexpected Journey” (complete with an interminable dinner-party sequence that was like a Middle-earth “Exterminating Angel”), Jackson quickened the pace considerably for last year’s “The Desolation of Smaug,” which built to a breathless, “Empire Strikes Back”-style cliffhanger, only with fire substituted for ice. Having finally arrived at their usurped ancestral kingdom, our band of intrepid dwarf warriors (plus one weary hobbit) found themselves face-to-face with the gold-hoarding dragon Smaug. Crankily stirred from his slumber, the great beast in turn winged off into the night to obliterate the (mostly) innocent human denizens of nearby Lake-town, punishment for helping Bilbo and company to reach his door.

“The Battle of the Five Armies” picks up exactly there, with Smaug swooping down in a blaze of fiery vengeance, while the panicked Lake-town locals disperse in various displays of cowardice and courage. It’s an exciting sequence, animated by a real sense of danger and by the nightmare figure of Smaug himself (one of the movie’s most special effects, again voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch), who exudes a kind of grotesque majesty even as he flaps his great wings for the last time and falls thunderously to his death. But the joy brought by the vanquishing of the dragon proves short-lived, as something far more sinister — namely, politics — soon rears its hydra-like head.



As has held true for promised lands of all sorts since time immemorial (and continues to do so), Erebor in the post-Smaug era becomes a contentious destination for various tribes who hold some real or imagined claim to the mountain and its vast store of riches, including large contingents of Iron Hills dwarves (under the command of Billy Connolly’s Gen. Dain Underfoot), Woodland elves (led by Lee Pace’s Thranduil) and the displaced masses of Lake-town itself, reluctantly corralled by the dragon-slaying boat captain Bard (Luke Evans). It doesn’t help matters that the dwarf prince Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), presumptive heir to Erebor’s throne, is not long inside these hallowed walls when he succumbs to a familiar Tolkeinian malady — a lust for gold and jewels that renders its victims void of reason or empathy. And if “The Battle of the Five Armies” feels psychologically weightier than the previous “Hobbit” films, that’s largely a credit to Armitage, who plays Thorin with the paranoid despotic rage of a Shakespearean king, his heavy-lidded eyes ablaze with a private madness.

Even fair Bilbo, so skilled in negotiating with ruthless opponents like Gollum and Smaug, finds himself unable to speak truth to power, and thus spends much of “The Battle of the Five Armies” watching from the sidelines, a supporting character in his own eponymous narrative. But then, the battle’s the thing this time, and when Jackson gets to the nearly hourlong setpiece (commencing around the 70-minute mark), he stages it grandly even by his own Wagnerian standards. From all corners of the land — and the frame — they come: dwarves, elves, men and assorted forest creatures, initially at cross-purposes, but soon enough united against not one but two flanks of hideous, bulbous orcs on a mission from their god, the dark lord Sauron, who’s been hankering for a comeback.

This sort of scene, drawing on every available trick in the CGI paintbox, has become such a reliable staple of Jackson’s work (to say nothing of the many lesser films of the past decade that have worn his influence on their sleeves) as to risk seeming almost ordinary. But Jackson, who’s surely aware of this conundrum, invests his five-army rumble with such a visceral feeling for landscape and physical action, a sure eye for elaborate battlefield choreography and, above all, a sense of purpose, that he leaves most of the competition — including some of his own previous battle sequences — seeming like so much digital white noise. Like George Lucas before him, Jackson has unmistakably brushed up on his Kurosawa, and there is at least one image here — of elf warriors leaping over the backs of dwarves and into a head-on orc charge — that could pass as an outtake from “Ran.” Better still: a mano a mano dwarf-vs.-orc duel atop a frozen waterfall that is, shot for shot, one of Jackson’s very best things.

Intermittently, “The Battle of the Five Armies” takes time out to catch us up on the whereabouts of old Gandalf (Ian McKellen, with his usual hammy gusto), the star-crossed interspecies romance of Amazonian elf Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly) and lovestruck dwarf Kili (Aidan Turner), plus flashy cameos for the ethereal Galadriel (Cate Blanchett) and the white wizard Saruman (Christopher Lee, still spry and swashbuckling in his early 90s). On balance, though, this is the least episodic and digressive of the “Hobbit” films, and the one that shows the least evidence of the elaborate patchwork Jackson and his co-screenwriters have done (to disparate bits of Tolkein’s writing plus no small amount of their own invention) in order to transform the slender “Hobbit” narrative into something that might rival “Lord of the Rings” for sheer breadth and depth.

While that effort has ultimately proved only partly successful, it’s easier now to see the entire “Hobbit” project as a labor of love on Jackson’s part, rather than a descent into crass box-office opportunism. Where the first two films often felt like a marking of time by a director intent on fattening his own Smaug-like coffers, “The Battle of the Five Armies” contains a series of emotional payoffs and bridges to the “Lord of the Rings” films that work as well as they do for having been carefully seeded by Jackson in the previous episodes. And if none of the “Hobbit” films resonate with “Rings'” mythic grandeur, it’s hard not to marvel at Jackson’s facility with these characters and this world, which he seems to know as well as John Ford knew his Monument Valley, and to which he here bids an elegiac adieu. Indeed, it is not only Bilbo but Jackson too who returns to the safety of his Hobbit hole, weary and winded, with a quizzical grimace on his face that seems to say: “Where do I go from here?”

Set in a bleak midwinter, with nary a patch of Shire green to be seen until the closing frames, “Battle” sports the most austere and forbidding look of the “Hobbit” films (courtesy of series lenser Andrew Lesnie), entirely absent the overly bright, backlot feel that pervaded “An Unexpected Journey” and parts of “Smaug.” Howard Shore contributes another dynamically ranging (and ever present) score, from gentle Celtic melodies to speaker-rattling basso profondo bombast. Other tech contributions, repping at least five armies’ worth of set designers, costumers, armorers and VFX artists, once again give us the best that Hollywood (and New Zealand tax incentive) dollars can buy.

Film Review: 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies'
Reviewed at Warner Bros. screening room, New York, Nov. 26, 2014. MPAA Rating: PG-13. Running time: 144 MIN.

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Ich wollte gerade löschen.

Edit: Hab's jetzt herausgenommen. So nötig haben "wir" gute Kritiken nicht. ;)

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http://www.screendaily.com/reviews/the- ... tentID=592

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The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies


The final chapter of The Hobbit proves to be very much of a piece with the trilogy’s first two instalments: It’s robustly entertaining, occasionally affecting, sometimes thrilling, not exactly groundbreaking. From the start, the challenge facing director Peter Jackson when he signed on to this franchise four years ago would be trying to live up to the legacy of The Lord Of The Rings and, as The Battle Of The Five Armies makes plain, his Hobbit films never fully escaped the large shadow cast by his previous trilogy. That said, managed expectations are all that’s really necessary: This satisfying Battle showcases Jackson’s still-potent skill for sculpting large-scale action scenes, even if the freshness of his vision has faded.

The conclusion of The Hobbit doesn’t stir the soul as much as it rocks the senses and quickens the pulse. The Battle Of The Five Armies delivers marvellously on the promise of its title — but not much more than that.

Opening across most of Earth by the middle of December, The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies will be shooting for a $1b worldwide gross, which was achieved by 2003’s The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King and 2012’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. (Last year’s The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug made “merely” $960m.) Although this Warner Bros. offering doesn’t have the holiday season to itself, awareness of the J.R.R. Tolkien series is high. Add to that the fact that this is the final instalment, and Battle seems all but certain to garner major returns.

Immediately picking up where The Desolation Of Smaug left off, The Battle Of The Five Armies consists mostly of two significant battle sequences, one much longer than the other. In the first, the citizens of Lake-town must contend with the rampaging, fire-breathing dragon Smaug (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch). In the second, which comprises most of the final half of the film, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) and his companions, including the valiant Dwarf Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), square off with a collection of rival armies for control of Erebor and its vast treasures.

Despite featuring different central characters — with the notable exception of the popular Gandalf (played, as always, with regal grandeur by Ian McKellen), who appears in all six instalments — The Lord Of The Rings and The Hobbit have been filmed by Jackson with considerable tonal and visual continuity. Relying on sweeping vistas (often bolstered by CGI) of the varied lands of Middle-earth, the filmmaker has opted for a grand, almost mythic canvas in which character nuance takes a backseat to timeless themes such as honour, love and self-sacrifice.

Jackson’s return to Tolkien’s world for The Hobbit provides a natural bridge back to the original trilogy, especially as Battle’s final moments become an intro into the events that kicked off the first Lord Of The Rings film. But by signing up for another three-film go-round through Middle-earth, Jackson inevitably pitted himself against his own past success. Just as with the first two Hobbit movies, The Battle Of The Five Armies offers plenty of expert action sequences and solemn grappling between good and evil, but it doesn’t do any of it in a way that’s appreciably more stunning than what occurred in The Lord Of The Rings. That fatigue of familiarity provokes an unusual phenomenon in which a viewer can be suitably roused by what’s on screen in The Battle Of The Five Armies and yet still feel slightly underwhelmed.

This problem is exacerbated by the fact that The Hobbit’s new characters lacked the snap and gravitas of the original trilogy’s. Whereas Elijah Wood’s Frodo and Viggo Mortensen’s Aragorn were a nifty juxtaposition of impressionable naïf and rugged warrior, Bilbo and Thorin’s similar interplay is less dynamic. Though they’re both good actors with a gift for subtlety and pathos, Freeman and Armitage are a bit swallowed up by the action surrounding them, only really allowed to shine near Battle’s end once the warring ceases and their characters’ bond is finally allowed to be addressed.

In truth, Thorin is Battle’s main character with the greater arc: Early on in Battle, the noble Dwarf succumbs to madness, his lust to keep all of Erebor’s gold prompting him to declare war on Middle-earth’s other tribes, even those who are the Dwarves’ comrades. Thorin’s eventual change of heart may be simplistically dramatised, but Armitage gives it a punch, showing us how a good Dwarf can let greed temporarily blind him.


Still, even though the Hobbit films have had an array of personalities — including Lee Pace’s haughty Elf Thranduil and Luke Evans’s courageous, modest human Bard — there haven’t been the same emotional anchors that helped guide The Lord Of The Rings. As a result, The Battle Of The Five Armies — as well as The Hobbit in general — is only sporadically heartrending, its stakes mostly of the superficial life-or-death kind as Bilbo and his friends confront the reliably terrifying Orcs.

Thankfully, Jackson succeeds in continually upping the wow factor of the climactic battle, unleashing plenty of CGI for the acres-wide combat scenes and then increasing the intensity when the all-out war shifts to one-on-one bouts. (Orlando Bloom is both one of Battle’s highlights and one of this trilogy’s nagging limitations: His performance as Legolas remains commanding, and he’s crucial to the film’s finale, but he also feels shoehorned into the story to ensure that some of the more beloved Lord Of The Rings characters appear in The Hobbit.) For as much as Battle’s characters talk about bravery, loyalty and integrity, the script’s on-the-nose dialogue doesn’t have the resonance or crackle of the action scenes, in which Jackson’s rugged heroes communicate much more articulately through swords, grunts and anguished wails. Because the filmmaker prefers over-the-top spectacle, the hum of nonstop battle is this movie’s most riveting, expressive component.

Of course, those who loved Jackson’s Lord Of The Rings trilogy will complain that he used to do more than just provide spectacle, finding the heart and childlike thrill of adventure in the midst of an epic fantasy tale. He still can somewhat in Battle, which is most deeply felt when it focuses on characters who are suddenly separated by death. But the conclusion of The Hobbit doesn’t stir the soul as much as it rocks the senses and quickens the pulse. The Battle Of The Five Armies delivers marvellously on the promise of its title — but not much more than that.

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@Laudine: Danke! :kuss:
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Gute Nacht! :bed:
Aber eins hätte ich noch ;):
http://www.thewrap.com/the-hobbit-the-b ... blanchett/

Zitat:
Peter Jackson gives us more of the same in this franchise-ender co-starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Evangeline Lilly, and Orlando Bloom

When J.R.R. Tolkien's son accused Peter Jackson of missing the point of the Middle-earth books two years ago, he was far from alone in his distaste for the director's emphasis on spectacle above all else. If such disapproval bothers Jackson, the action auteur doesn't let it show. In fact, “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies,” which caps the trilogy, finds Jackson doubling down against his detractors by inserting a 45-minute battle sequence into his adaptation of the anti-war children's book.

Growing tension between the Tolkien estate and Warner Brothers has all but guaranteed that “Five Armies” will be Jackson's last time in Middle-earth, so this prequel to the “Lord of the Rings” is the filmmaker's final opportunity to vindicate his thrill-seeking, special effects-heavy, more-female-friendly vision.

Also read: 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' Gets Epic Full Trailer (Video)

But the lumbering and overstuffed “Five Armies” only proves Christopher Tolkien right. The 144-minute running time showcases Jackson's worst tendencies: eons-long battle scenes, sloppy and abrupt resolutions, portentous romances, off-rhythm comic timing, and, newly in this case, patience-testing fan service.

Nonstop motion and a sense of fist-clenched urgency propel the buildup to and the melée of an interspecies conflict between dwarves, elves, goblins, and plain old humans. (A fifth contingent arrives much later.) The early defeat of the dragon Smaug (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) leads to a war over the hills of jewels and coins (“gold beyond grief and sorrow”) the creature had been hoarding, with each side (except the goblins) thumping its chest about its legitimate claims to the fortune.

Also read: 'The Hobbit' Takes Over Air New Zealand's 'Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made' (Video)

HBT3-066142rBilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), the titular hobbit, is sidelined for more conventional swashbuckling heroes like the quick-witted human leader Bard (Luke Evans), who hopes to use some of Smaug's treasures to rebuild his town after it was set ablaze by the dragon, and the archer-elf Legolas (Orlando Bloom), who doesn't appear in Tolkien's text but has been recruited for feats of acrobatic derring-do (and raising the film's prettiness quotient) by Jackson and his co-writers Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Guillermo del Toro.

Adding to the film's already considerable bloat are plot-irrelevant scenes starring franchise favorites that amount to little more than shout-outs to fans. The elf Galadriel (Cate Blanchett) and the wizards Gandalf and Saruman (Ian McKellen and Christopher Lee) pontificate and whip their magic sticks at Art Nouveau-esque demon-ghosts atop a mountain. It's beautiful to witness their pale, impractical robes and paler, even more impractical manes swirling around them in Ren Faire perfection, but it also has almost nothing at all to do with the turmoil going on below.

The strains in stretching out the last third of a 384-page book to epic proportions are most apparent in the cramped emotional arcs of the would-be dwarf-king Thorin (Richard Armitage), whose refusal to share Smaug's riches with the human refugees incites the war, and the elf-warrior Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly), whose forbidden love for the handsome dwarf Kili (Aidan Turner) retreads territory already covered by Arwen (Liv Tyler) in the “Lord of the Ring” movies.

Also read: CES: RealD's New Image Enhancement Technology Gets Peter Jackson's Endorsement

Tolkien's rather simple anti-greed message is taken to grandiose extremes in a hallucination scene starring Thorin (whose avarice is never afforded complications or resonance). Likewise, Tauriel and Kili's romance, which sparked some fleet flirting in “The Desolation of Smaug,” is sunk by overwrought bombast in the numbing and interminable epilogue.

As usual, the splendor is in the details — in Tauriel's byzantine braids, the careful sizing of the characters’ eyebrows (more hair means more evil), and the elaborate ugliness of the goblins, with scars and metal staples dispersed across their heads in surprising locations. It's curious, then, that Jackson's grand vision includes some rather egregious oversights. (Very minor spoiler for the ending: We never learn, for example, what happens to the gold over which the war was fought.)

“Five Armies” is a carefully controlled circus of freaks, marvels, grotesqueries, and high-flying pageantry. And like any circus, we're there to gasp and to laugh, but not to feel. “The Hobbit” movies have taken us there and back again, and I'm mostly just relieved the journey is now over.


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BeitragVerfasst: 02.12.2014, 01:23 
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Der Guardian gibt 3 von 5 Sternen:
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/de ... er-jackson

Zitat:
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies review - delivers exactly what it promised
The final section of Peter Jackson’s Tolkien trilogy rounds off the story of Bilbo Baggins with the monumental confrontation its title suggests

3 out of 5
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Andrew Pulver
Andrew Pulver
theguardian.com, Monday 1 December 2014 22.00 GMT
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Ian McKellen, Luke Evans, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Definitely the last time … Ian McKellen and Luke Evans in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, the final part of the Tolkien adaptation. Photograph: Mark Pokorny/AP
Shortly after the climactic battle scene of this final instalment of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit series gets underway, an outsize troll-like monstrosity with a pointed stone headpiece runs full tilt into a fortress wall, making a breach through which a bunch of orcs and other malevolent nasties can pour through. The troll, or whatever it is, lies full length on the ground, stunned; entirely disregarded as its compadres swarm past. Well, I can sympathise entirely; I reeled out of the cinema in bit of a daze myself after this extended dose of Jackson’s patented ye olde Middle Earth cranium-smashing.

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies promises to be the New Zealand director’s final excursion into Tolkien territory, and for that some praise is due, for staying the course if nothing else. The first Lord of the Rings film, The Fellowship of the Ring, was released almost exactly 13 years ago, in 2001, and the six instalments of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies make up a remarkably homogenous body of work. Like Agatha Christie’s detective novels, there would appear little in the way of aesthetic – as opposed to technological – progression; having set the tone so definitively at the outset, each film delivered exactly what it promised.

That’s not to say Jackson’s achievement hasn’t been impressive: the epic potential of The Lord of the Rings was perhaps simple enough to spot, but a monumental effort to pull off. Applying the same thunderous template to the chirpy Hobbit, however, required adroit footwork to avoid the feeling that the whole thing had been padded out. Well, the pace doesn’t flag in this final section, even if it’s shorter by almost 20 minutes than either of its two predecessors; however, the late-breaking change of title (from the considerably more fey There and Back Again) tells you that heading towards some sort of monumental showdown is this film’s central preoccupation.

The Battle of the Five Armies picks up where Desolation of Smaug leaves off, practically in mid-sentence. The dragon is hurtling down towards the watery hovels of Laketown, Thorin Oakenshield is getting a little twitchy down in the treasure hoard, and Gandalf is swinging gently in the breeze in an iron cage in Sauron’s ruined castle. Almost immediately, we are plunged into a hellstorm of grandiose proportions, as Smaug lays down an impressively methodical carpet-fire-breathing assault, laying waste to Laketown and forcing the inhabitants to flee, until taken out by iron-arrowed Bard the Bowman (Luke Evans). Thorin (played by Richard Armitage), meanwhile, is succumbing to what is fetchingly termed “dragon sickness” – a saucer-eyed hunger for gold that causes him to lose his Braveheart-ish dignity and sense of honour. Another of the myriad concurrent plot strands sees Cate Blanchett, Christopher Lee and Hugo Weaving turn up like some kind of smocked-and-gowned superhero team to see off Sauron, with director Jackson indulging in unexpectedly trippy Doctor Who-ish visuals.

The Hobbit Battle of the Five Armies film still
As for Bilbo Baggins – well, he doesn’t have a whole lot to do. Martin Freeman is as likeably careworn as ever in the part, but as Jackson shuffles and prods events towards the gargantuan confrontation signalled from the outset, it is evident that Thorin is the film’s pivotal character, and the one with the most repeatedly inspected “journey”. Bilbo has a couple of errands to run, a ring to fiddle about with, but not much else – and certainly not much in the way of fighting. Jackson, for understandable reasons, has concentrated his cinematic fire on the clang of swordplay and the roar of battle; this consigns Bilbo to a peripheral role throughout. Of course, and I don’t think this is too much of a spoiler, his return to the Shire is calibrated for maximum heartstring-tugging, as well as one or two bits of business to close the loop to the Lord of the Rings movies.

Be that as it may, this film is a fitting cap to an extended series that, if nothing else, has transformed Tolkien’s place in the wider culture. His books were once strictly for spotty teen nerds (I think we’ve all been there), and while The Battle of the Five Armies is unlikely to repeat the Oscar sweep that greeted the conclusion of Jackson’s first Tolkien trilogy, in truth it is just as enjoyable as each of the five films that came before it. Jackson may or may not be resigned to the fact that, unless something very dramatic emerges, they will be his principal cinematic legacy – his pre-Rings eccentricity having been thoroughly eclipsed – but at least he can take a bit of time off. He’s earned it.

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Und nun noch der Daily Telegraph - nur 2 Sterne für den Film:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/film ... exist.html

Zitat:
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, first look review: 'begs not to exist'
One great set piece and Christopher Lee's kung fu skills can't make up for all the padding in Peter Jackson's third and final Hobbit film, says Tim Robey
2 out of 5 stars
Cate Blanchett and Ian McKellen in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Grudge match: Cate Blanchett and Ian McKellen in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
By Tim Robey10:00PM GMT 01 Dec 2014Follow CommentsComment
Director: Peter Jackson. Starring: Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage, Luke Evans, Evangeline Lilly, Orlando Bloom, Aidan Turner, Manu Bennett, Lee Pace, Stephen Fry, Sylvester McCoy, Benedict Cumberbatch, Cate Blanchett, Christopher Lee, Ian Holm. 12A cert, 144 min.
“So began a battle that none had expected,” wrote JRR Tolkien in the third-from-last chapter of The Hobbit. “And it was called The Battle of the Five Armies, and it was very terrible.” Peter Jackson’s expansion of this epochal but barely-described fracas, in his third and final film from this slim book, is neither very terrible nor remotely unexpected. It’s a series of stomping footnotes in search of a climax.
In terms of story so far, it ends virtually when it starts – with super-peeved dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch) raining down fiery destruction on the pitiful residents of Laketown, and facing the last-ditch heroism of an archer called Bard (Luke Evans).
Everything else is scraps, in both senses. Jackson’s one recourse is to ape the here-we-go-again war mania of The Return of the King. Humans, dwarves and elves duke it out with orcs and wild wolves. It's a whopping great grudge match, a squabble over the contents of Smaug’s mountain lair, and goodness knows what else.
The trouble is that Jackson can’t make it mean very much: when every life on Middle Earth is seemingly at stake, few individually grab our attention. There’s more aftermath than plot left, and very little of it has to do with Bilbo (Martin Freeman), who feels increasingly like a forlorn bystander in his own franchise.
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The further and more competently the movie trundles on, the more it begs not to exist, really: hindsight favours a two-part adaptation at most. This isn’t to say there aren’t bright spots. However it was fudged, 92-year-old Christopher Lee doing Shaolin kung fu with his magic staff is great value. And the last third is rescued by one meaty, entertaining set piece – crumbling citadel, frozen lake, one-on-one duels between orcs and the principal cast. Freeman, and Evangeline Lilly as the not-in-Tolkien elf maiden Tauriel, inject some unforced pathos which puts many of their dewy-eyed co-stars to shame.

The bloom has come off Orlando, though, whose main achievement as Legolas – other than some ridiculous mid-air running up collapsing masonry – is to illustrate perfectly what Joey Tribbiani from Friends called “smell the fart acting”.
When the dwarf leader Thorin (Richard Armitage) imagines himself drowning in a pool of molten gold, Jackson’s pet message that Greed Is Bad rings out again – but you have to wonder if a triple-your-money release strategy is quite the seemliest context to preach it in. At 6ft 2", Armitage must be the tallest actor ever to play a dwarf. The film is the opposite: a paragraph on steroids.
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies is released on December 12

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Ich habe extra mit dem Posten gewartet. :lol: Gute Nacht! :winke: :kuss:

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Laudine hat geschrieben:
Ich habe extra mit dem Posten gewartet. :lol: Gute Nacht! :winke: :kuss:

Hast Du gemerkt, dass ich "im Rausch" bin? ;) Ciao und gute Nacht! :winke:

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