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BeitragVerfasst: 04.05.2018, 17:01 
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Richard "rettet" 'Wolverine' und ist wohl für den Kritiker ein wichtiger Grund dafür, den Podcast in seine Liste der zehn besten dieses Jahres (bisher) aufzunehmen:

Zitat:
podcasts
May 3, 2018 1:32 pm

The Best Podcasts of 2018 (So Far)

By Nicholas Quah


Four months into the year, the fight for the Podcast Throne of 2018 remains very much up for grabs. We were spoiled last year with the early introduction of S-Town, which dropped in March and pretty much owned the industry narrative for the rest of the calendar. No such instant coronations this time around. Instead, we have a steady stream of really interesting projects that promise to take podcasting into wildly different directions.

A few quick notes on methodology: Craft is a bit more important to me than the stories themselves. I tend to put more stock into podcasts that function well as stand-alone experiences, though I’m aware that puts comedy, conversational, and “after-show” series at a disadvantage. And, as always, more established shows have the added burden of being ranked against prior seasons.

Oh, and of course, this list is definitive and all-encompassing and in no way is defined by the subjective limitations of myself, a human being with his own tastes and preferences. Let’s go!

Caliphate (The New York Times)

Gripping, bold, and unsettling, the New York Times’ first serialized audio documentary is essential listening, full stop. Driven by a dynamic duo, Times foreign correspondent Rukmini Callimachi and Radiolab alum Andy Mills, Caliphate grapples with some fundamental questions about the withering, persistent conflict against terrorism that still consumes the western world: How does a person become radicalized? What is the dark appeal of the Islamic State? Who are we fighting, truly? Caliphate is immaculately produced, grounded with a vivid cinematic sensibility that melds well with the mind’s eye and an exceptionally strong opening sequence that pulls you into its world from the get-go. Above all, it’s a severe muscle flex from an audio team that’s only beginning to figure out what it’s capable of doing.

West Cork (Audible)

West Cork gets mad points for expanding the palate of the true crime podcast. Produced by documentarian Jennifer Ford and investigative journalist Sam Bungey, the podcast focuses on the 1996 murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier, a French film producer who was found near her Irish vacation home around the West Cork town of Schull; a cold case that’s fairly well-known in the region. The documentary turns on a major twist that you might spot from a million miles away (or through a rudimentary Google search), but it’s one of those stories where the revelation isn’t the point. Instead, what begins as a textbook performance of a cold case quickly turns into a rich and unsettling character study of a prime suspect that’s living, breathing, and actively participating in the analysis itself. Mind games abound, and listeners are made to reckon with the limitations of discerning truth from a moving target.

Personal Best (CBC)

If Nathan For You had a baby and left it in the Canadian woods to fend for itself, that baby would grow up to look a lot like Personal Best. Pitched as a “self-improvement show for people who don’t like self-improvement,” this comedy podcast is so much more than that. Every episode begins with someone’s simple request to fix or achieve something, but they all inevitably end up in the same place: a moment of realization, facilitated by a zany and wildly impractical solution, that reveals a deeper truth about being a human person. A funny and life-affirming romp through a world of hidden wants and quiet dreams, I love this show not just for its crazy adventures, but for the simple fact that it’s generous and gentle.

I Only Listen to the Mountain Goats (Night Vale Presents)

To love something well is an art in and of itself. That’s the big idea behind I Only Listen to the Mountain Goats, a Night Vale Presents project that recently wrapped up its first season. A collaboration between Welcome to Night Vale co-creator Joseph Fink and The Mountain Goats’ John Darnielle, the podcast is a vibrant and exciting listening companion to the band’s 2002 album All Hail West Texas. Every episode is dedicated to a different track on the album, and they feature the two artists — plus special musical guests like Andrew Bird, Amanda Palmer, and the Hold Steady’s Craig Finn — going deep not just about one particular song, but also larger questions concerning the creative process, the world, and how being an artist is largely informed by being a fan. In a lovely touch, every episode is capped with a cover of the song being discussed, underscoring the project’s larger themes about the relationship between fandom and art. I Only Listen to the Mountain Goats is a sensational and spirited idea, surpassed only by the wonder of its execution.

Wolverine: The Long Night (Stitcher and Marvel)

It could’ve been cheap. Worse, it could’ve been lame. That’s what I thought when I first heard Marvel was developing a fiction podcast based on Canada’s favorite cigar-chomping mutant, Wolverine. Everybody wants in on podcasting right now, and so Marvel’s gambit could have been as simple as getting some people to sit around and read lines from an old Logan arc. But that’s not what happened here. Instead, with The Long Night, a joint Marvel-Stitcher team set out to grapple with the opportunities and limitations of a story in which Logan is conveyed purely as a creature of sound: flesh-piercing claws and all. The story isn’t perfect, nor are some of the performances, but Richard Armitage’s Logan is legitimately thrilling. Marvel’s first serious stab at audio is a solid one, and one can only marvel at where it could go from here.

Slow Burn (Slate)

Come for the parallels between Nixon-era maelstroms and Trump-era pandemonium, stay for the endless stream of insane details. Hosted by Slate staff writer Leon Neyfakh, who boasts an alluringly dry vocal affect, the podcast is premised on helping listeners understand what it felt like to live through a specific historical moment — in this case, the Watergate scandal. The framing alone makes Slow Burn distinct from most of its genre peers, but its success largely rises from the strength of its meticulous research and its commitment to presenting the stories of the various characters it excavates from time.

The Rewatchables (The Ringer)

Few things are more pleasurable than a group of smart, funny, and deeply nostalgic people going long on a piece of culture they really love. For The Rewatchables, the piece of culture is the movies that you can watch over and over and over again: Point Break, The Big Lebowski, You’ve Got Mail. Yes, great podcasts that go deep on beloved films are a dime a dozen — think The Canon, The Next Picture Show, How Did This Get Made (sorta) — but The Rewatchables pops off the Apple Podcast charts due to the sheer charisma and chemistry of its rotating cast of panelists.

Making Obama (WBEZ)

WBEZ’s follow-up to Making Oprah is a gem. Hosted once again by Jenn White, this short audio documentary on the 44th president of the United States specifically focuses on his young adulthood in Chicago, where Obama cut his teeth as a community organizer, ran for office, and planted the seeds that would set the future in motion. Chicago plays no small role in shaping the man who would become this country’s first black president, and Making Obama understands this immensely. Over the course of six solidly produced episodes, the podcast is evocative in how it illustrates the impact of a place on a person, and a city on a psyche.

Wooden Overcoats (Independent)

This daffy British podcast sitcom has been around since 2015, and it’s only gotten better over time. Wooden Overcoats is a story about rival funeral directors in a small village on a tiny island in the English Channel, but like most stories set in small villages on tiny islands in pastoral locations, it’s a playground for countless hijinks and a sprawling set of quirky characters (including, among others, a mouse that serves as gossipy narrator). I only started getting into this show pretty late into its second season, and it was a great time to witness the production kick into high gear. Now in its third season, which kicked off in March, Wooden Overcoats has never been more addictive, and its world has never been more interesting.

The Habitat (Gimlet Media)

Lynn Levy’s Real World: Mars approach to the humdrum exploits of a HI-SEAS mission, in which a couple of scientists volunteer to spend time living in an isolated dome for science, proved to be a little divisive, with some listeners complaining about the lack of actual science in the podcast. I understand those complaints, but I’m not particularly sympathetic because that would be asking for a completely different show. On its own terms, The Habitat is a charming look at a group of normal people mundanely carrying out their lives in an extraordinary environment. It’s a sly juxtaposition, but also pretty audacious.

Honorable Mentions

Two shows that are still too early in their runs to list, but are nonetheless catching heat: Death in Ice Valley, the true crime collaboration between the BBC and Norway’s NRK, and the second season of In The Dark. Both are already superb.
Don’t miss Chana Joffe-Walt’s “Five Women” episode of This American Life. It’s an exceptionally powerful entry into the growing body of #MeToo stories.
I have a real soft spot for Off Book: The Improvised Musical, which has been so good lately.



http://www.vulture.com/2018/05/best-podcasts-2018-so-far.html?utm_medium=s1&utm_source=tw&utm_campaign=vulture

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Verfasst: 04.05.2018, 17:01 


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BeitragVerfasst: 07.05.2018, 17:07 
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BeitragVerfasst: 07.05.2018, 19:28 
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Danke, LucasThorin.

Richard macht keine Werbung für den Schnippsel, sondern retweetet indes lieber Folgendes: :lol:

Zitat:
Wolverine@itsthewolverine

“I gotta put these claws to good use.” The finale of "Wolverine: The Long Night" is here. Listen to the full series on @Stitcher Premium: http://bit.ly/2wkQAsk #WolverinePodcast


https://twitter.com/itsthewolverine/status/993517090916257792

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.05.2018, 20:06 
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Ich bin immer wieder baff, wenn ich die Aufrufezahlen bei den YouTube-Clips sehe... Wahnsinn, wie viele Leute die Sache verfolgen. :shock:

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Die Kommentare sollte man sich dafür nicht allzu genau ansehen. :?

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Bei dem Franchise ist an sinnvollen Kommentaren leider nicht alltu viel zu erwarten. :?

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BeitragVerfasst: 10.05.2018, 10:52 
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Ich bin bei der Debatte um Richard als Nachfolger von Hugh Jackman total hin- und hergerissen. Abgesehen davon, dass das nichts ist, was zu meinem üblichen Kinoprogramm zählt, bin ich mir nicht sicher, ob die Nachfolge letztlich nicht mehr schaden als nutzen würde. Ich sehe schon, dass Richard Aufmerksamkeit erhielte und eine gesicherte Beschäftigung. Aber wie hilfreich bzw. schädlich ist die Ähnlichkeit mit Jackman, mit dem Richard schon jetzt oft genug verwechselt wird. Und wie stark behindert eine solche Bindung die Auswahl anderer Projekte. Mir reicht derzeit schon die Dauerwarteschleife wegen 'My Zoe'. :sigh2:

Zum Abschluss der Podcast-Serie:

Zitat:

Marvel’s Scripted Podcast ‘Wolverine: The Long Night’ Reaches Its Finale

by Hannah Means Shannon

As we’ve mentioned previously, Marvel have been running their first ever scripted podcast on Stitcher Premium, and it’s been an X-Files-ish and noirish tale set in the Pacific Northwest featuring a fan-favorite clawed hero.

In Wolverine: The Long Night, 10 episodes have reached their finale recently, and you can now listen to them all. However, in September 2018, the entire podcast will also be released across all podcast platforms more widely.

The podcast has been garnering praise for story, sound production, voice acting, and its hybrid of mystery and fantasy.

Dan Silver, head of platforms and content for Marvel New Media, says:

As our first scripted podcast, we are thrilled by the overwhelming response from critics and fans alike. With all 10 episodes now available on Stitcher Premium, fans can listen to ‘Wolverine: The Long Night’ in a complete, fully-realized experience that no other medium can offer. As our storytelling continues to grow and evolve, we are excited to explore other opportunities in this space.

In the finale, Logan and the Agents finally have their “face to face”, and Pierce and Marshall each have to make their hardest decision yet. Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) and Tad Marshall (Ato Essandoh) are agents who arrive in the fictional town of Burns, Alaska, to investigate a series of murders and a possible serial killer. The agents team up with deputy Bobby Reid (Andrew Keenan-Bolger) to investigate their main suspect, Logan (Richard Armitage). Their search leads them deeper into the corruption of the town.

Armitage explains about Logan’s role:

This is an extremely visual and visceral story. For Logan, this is a journey of self-discovery, laced with abhorrence. He’s a man of action rather than words – a dynamic character who is at odds with his own existence. As we get to know him over 10 episodes, it appears that he’s getting to know himself. His power is his downfall, and his revelation about how to use that power and reconcile with his self-perceived rotten decayed soul builds the complexity of his character. I’m a sucker for a great story, and I really enjoyed the writing for this series. I hope fans feel the same.

Wolverine: The Long Night was written by comic book author Ben Percy (The Wilding, Red Moon) and directed by Brendan Baker (formerly a producer for Radiotopia’s “Love & Radio”) with sound design by Chloe Prasinos (formerly a producer for Gimlet’s “Reply All”). The series is produced by Daniel Fink of Marvel and Jenny Radelet of Stitcher.


http://www.comicon.com/2018/05/09/marvels-scripted-podcast-wolverine-the-long-night-reaches-its-finale/

Ich bin gespannt, wer und wo man dann im September Zugriff erhält.

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Ich brauche Richard auch nicht unbedingt als Wolverine... so verzweifelt bin ich noch nicht. :lol:
Aber ich würde schon gern mal wieder etwas neues von ihm sehen. :sigh: So ein neues Filmprojekt wäre schon schön...

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So langsam sollte mal ein Dreh anstehen, wenn unser Board nicht 2019 formschön verstummen soll. ;) :irre: :sigh2:

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Wolverine oder Dinge in dieser Art waren nie Meins, aber ich muss zugeben, viele Dinge die Richard macht, liegen nicht unbedingt in meinen Interessensgebieten (müssen sie ja auch nicht), hin und wieder kann er mich sogar für etwas Neues begeistern, dass ich mir sonst wohl nicht angeschaut hätte.
Muss mich aber anschließen, so langsam....hab ich alles was es gibt zum....xten mal durch. Aber in diesem Geschäft ist man halt auch nicht bei wünsch Dir was. Das ist die Kehrseite dieses Berufs, manchmal geht halt nix. Er macht derweil Hörbücher....
Miss you Rich...kann ich da nur sagen !

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Bestmögliche Review in Sachen Sterne und Lob von Richard:

Zitat:
Review: WOLVERINE: THE LONG NIGHT

Marvel Comics Reviews

3 hours ago

WOLVERINE: THE LONG NIGHT (scripted audio podcast)
Written by Ben Percy
Directed by Brendan Baker
Starring Richard Armitage, Celia Keenan-Bolger, Ato Essandoh and Andrew Keenan-Bolger
Sound Design by Chloe Prasinos
Published by Marvel Comics
Produced by Daniel Fink and Jenny Radelet
Released through Stitcher Audio
Release Date: Episode 1 released on Mar 12 and Episode 10 released on May 07
Episode Length: 28 to 39 minutes per episode.

Writing this review is tricky because, at the heart of this series, sound plays a more pivotal role than sight. For a medium that had entertained through visuals, Marvel needs a tremendous amount of praise for attempting to push entertainment via audio. While they have obviously spend a long time traversing the well worn roads of visuals, both live action and animation, the domain of the audio drama is not exactly something fans of Marvel might have expected. Perhaps this effort by writer Ben Percy was nothing more than an amusing project meant to gauge the market, but even if that is the case, Wolverine: The Long Night is an amazing and wonderful addition to the Marvel content universe and it stands on its own as something wonderfully unique in a universe where we think we ‘know’ all the ways these characters can manifest. I would also like to point out that this series, more so than the Hunt for Wolverine on-going event, genuinely has gotten me far more interested in Wolverine than perhaps even I thought was possible. So, as a really non-Wolverine fan, to say this podcast makes me excited? Well, I hope that in and of itself might be enough to make you jump through the hoops required to check this series out.

Wolverine: The Long Night is a series in the vein of a murder mystery that takes place out in a town called Burns, Alaska. The main narrative focuses on two agents called Pierce and Marshall who are pursuing Wolverine after his presence is tied to a series of murders. The agents run afoul of local police, a frightening cult and various other figures in their efforts to find Wolverine, but there are enough twists and turns to make the phrase ‘don’t trust anything’ really mean something.

Before I really dig into what is great about this podcast, I need to be up-front about how you, dear reader (and, potential listener) can actually get this series. Marvel has the whole podcast provided through a podcast provider called Stitcher. What the www.wolverinepodcast.com website currently, as of this review being drafted, has up is a code (simply MARVEL). This code allows people to have access to Stitcher content free for a month, after which you’ll be charged. Think of this deal as a kind of temptation to see if there is anything else through the platform you’d like while you’re listening to this dramatic podcast series. I was able to download Stitcher to my phone and then download all the Wolverine: The Long Night episodes directly so I could listen to everything when I wanted without worrying about wifi. In all, the process is painless, but you’ll need to make use of the MARVEL code to avoid paying out of pocket up front.

So, are the steps worth it? Having been skeptical about the series, I would say ‘yes, absolutely.’

Wolverine: The Long Night is a dramatic podcast which has a theme somewhat in the vein of a hybrid documentary and serial show. Episodes tend to make use of their actors best talents by getting them to be put into positions where character A interviews character B, thus allowing for both (or, multiple) actors to show off their talent. And they do. Everyone in this series brings their A game. One character, the mother of a murdered young woman, is so good that I genuinely got entranced by how powerful she delivered her sequence. The sequences are transitioned into and out of the story through very clever narration devices, things which really play on the idea that you’re listening to something and not watching or reading. For example, an interview you might think was going on in the present, after some clever audio design, is revealed to be a recording that is being listened to by the same characters a few hours later. In other words, you genuinely get the sense sometimes that the unexpected can pop up, even though you’re listening to a scripted series. The writer and designers of these episodes seem to take pleasure in teasing out all the fun sounds and devices that can make this sort of format POP.

As far as the acting talents who make up the dominant cast, praise goes first to the fantastic Richard Armitage (whom many might know as Thorin from Lord of the Rings, Francis Dolarhyde from Hannibal or even Trevor Belmont from Castlevania). It is difficult to think of a ‘sound’ for Wolverine that isn’t Hugh Jackman, but if Wolverine: The Long Night is a backdoor test to see how a new Wolverine actor might sound, he succeeds in ever way imaginable. While Armitage’s turn as Wolverine is actually one of the smaller parts in the series, the time Armitage does have dominates everything else in every episode he stars in. There are some smaller moments, especially from the first few episodes, which weigh heavier than some of his longer speaking moments in later episodes.

Playing against the dramatic skills of Armitage are the pairing of actress Celia Keenan-Bolger as Agent Sally Pierce and Ato Essandoh as Agent Tad Marshall. Keenan-Bolger and Essandoh do a tremendous amount of the heavy lifting in this series seeing as how their voices and interviews are the dominant matter through which Wolverine: The Long Night is carried through from a start and then to a conclusion. Keenan-Bolger plays Pierce as a more reserved and cautious personality in contrast to Essandoh’s Marshall who is more relaxed and intuitive. Each actor uses their inflection and emotion to deliver the rich sense of emotions like fear, excitement and even compassion. There are lines delivered by Keenan-Bolger concerning Wolverine’s scent (yes, really!) alone that genuinely made me consider Logan in a new dimension. I am not saying it was pretty, but her delivery was damn good. Considering the nature of this scripted story, all three leads, Keenan-Bolger, Essandoh and Armitage, to a tremendous job, and I am leaving out praise that should go to other actors for their roles. Brian Stokes Mitchell has a tremendously creepy turn as one character named Nicholas Prophet that needs to be heard to be believed.

I would be a poor reviewer of an audio podcast if I did not also praise the work of Chloe Prasinos for her stunning effort to make sure that no moment is devoid of life. From opening doors, to exterior excursions and shipyards, Wolverine: The Long Night feels genuinely alive through their efforts to deliver a setting rather than a stuffy staged delivery void of ambience. Little sounds, things we might take for granted, become subtle starts in every episode.

It is no stretch to say that Wolverine: The Long Night is a wonderful audio experience that every comic fan should check out, if only because there is really nothing else like it presently in Marvel’s entertainment toybox.

The Verdict: 10/10


http://www.comicosity.com/review-wolverine-the-long-night/

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BeitragVerfasst: 30.05.2018, 22:24 
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Typisch Richard! Ich möchte bitte auch eine Mail in Buchlange von ihm bekommen. :please: Ganz selbstlos korrigiere und diskutiere ich deren Inhalt dann auch gern mit dem Verfasser ganz ohne Zeitlimit bei persönlichen Treffen. :irre: :mrgreen: :lachen: Die Beschreibung seiner Wolverine-Stimme hat aber auch etwas! :daumen:

Zitat:
Wolverine: The Long Night opens up the possibilities for a Marvel Podcast Universe
The success of the 10-episode series — Marvel’s first venture into scripted podcasting — suggests a promising future


By Jordan White on May 30, 2018 2:19 pm

Courtesy of Marvel New Media

There’s a scene in the sixth episode of Marvel and Stitcher’s radio drama podcast Wolverine: The Long Night where special agent Tad Marshall is interviewing a boy whose home was attacked by… something. The agent is searching for Logan, aka the mutant hero Wolverine, who the agent thinks might be behind the attack. But the boy swears it wasn’t a man; it was a beast — and a huge one at that. This is the first time Marshall believes Logan might not be the cause of all the murders in the town of Burns, Alaska, though he’s still not wholly convinced.

Meanwhile, the audience isn’t sure what to believe. This account notwithstanding, the evidence points uncomfortably to Logan. But he’s the good guy, right? And the special agents must be the bad guys because they’re hunting him. Except… what if it’s the other way around?

This purposeful ambiguity is the slow, unraveling mystery at the core of Wolverine: The Long Night, a story nearly two years in the making, and it might change the landscape of scripted radio dramas in the endless expanse of podcasts.

In April 2017, Marvel’s New Media division asked comics writer Benjamin Percy to pitch an idea for a new scripted podcast series with Stitcher. He was given only two vague guidelines: the podcast had to feature Wolverine, and it had to be an investigative show in the mold of Serial or S-Town. Marvel was probably expecting a one or two-page summary. They got something much, much longer. “It had character bios, themes, my take on Wolverine’s history in comics and film, influences I would bring to the podcast, along with detailed breakdowns of every episode,” Percy says. “I put an exhaustive amount of work into it because I wanted to make it impossible for them to say no.”

“At the end of that pitch was an asterisk with a note that basically said, ‘Give this to me, or else,’” he says.

As it turns out, the not-so-veiled (and not-so-serious) threat wasn’t necessary. Percy’s pitch was exactly what Marvel was looking for, and his 30-page bible became the foundation for the first season of Marvel and Stitcher’s Wolverine: The Long Night, which concluded its 10-episode run in early May.
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“The audio medium is one that, for years, Marvel was intrigued by,” says Dan Fink, executive director of development for Marvel New Media and The Long Night’s producer. “It intrigued me to know how a Marvel superhero story would work in this medium. We weren’t looking to reinvent the wheel, we wanted to do what worked.”

What worked, according to Fink, were investigative shows like Serial or S-Town, where there was a narrator or investigator to guide listeners through the experience. This is why Wolverine isn’t necessarily the show’s lead character, even though his name is in the title. Listeners instead spend the most time with special agents Sally Pierce and Tad Marshall as they search for Logan in the remote town of Burns, Alaska, uncovering the town’s darkest secrets along the way.

“As a team, we reference Jaws a lot,” Fink says. “In the movie, you don’t see him all that much, but everyone’s talking about the shark. There’s all this fear and mystery. Your imagination starts playing games. After Jaws, everyone was scared to go in the water, because you couldn’t see the shark. And so by creating this elusiveness [about] who Wolverine truly is as a comic book character, we were like, ‘Let’s bring this back, and slowly have him come back out of his shell.’ That’s what season 1 is about. It’s Wolverine coming to terms with who he is, and accepting the mistakes he’s made.”

Scripted podcasts are common today, but The Long Night is the first time a company like Marvel has centered a narrative podcast on a major flagship character. Fink says Marvel searched all over for writers for The Long Night, both within Marvel’s creative and editorial departments and outside. In a bout of serendipity, Percy’s agent had an office next to Stitcher’s, and when he caught word of the project, he threw his client’s hat in the ring. Though Percy, at that point, had only worked with DC Comics, writing titles like Detective Comics, Green Arrow, and Teen Titans, Marvel was familiar with his work.

As Marvel was recruiting Percy to write their first narrative podcast, they were also recruiting Brendan Baker, producer of Love + Radio, to direct it. While he didn’t write an exhaustive 30-page pitch script like Percy, he did submit a treatment discussing elements he wanted to experiment with in audio fiction, such as telling a story in two different timelines and working with unreliable narrators.

Both of these elements are crucial to the storytelling in the series. Nearly every episode features a flashback of some sort, whether prompted by a witness testimony or a conversation in a bar. Those testimonies aren’t always truthful, and neither are the special agents.
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Baker refers to sound design as “designing an audience’s attention.” He and fellow director Chloe Prasinos were able to do that by using an ambisonic microphone, which records in a sphere, meaning it captures sounds above, below, and behind the mic. It also allows users to isolate different voices and change their positions in the mix, so listeners can hear things above or below them.

“One of the challenges of fictional podcasting or radio plays is trying to create an immersive experience for the listener,” Baker says. “In television, things are always mixed so the voices are in the center, and the side speakers are used for music or sound effects. But we knew in this case, most people would be listening through headphones, so we tried to create an audio environment that would be tailored to that listening experience.”

“Let’s say someone was telling a story about what happened to them in the woods earlier,” Percy says. “We could make the chuffing of the winds or the crackling of dried twigs beneath their feet, and sleet that might be pattering in their coat, and slip that into the conversation, and make the listener feel like they were there.”

The ambisonic mic necessitated a different method of recording the show. Instead of the standard “one-person, one-mic” studio approach that the actors recorded simultaneously, in the same room. The approach allowed for more interaction between actors, more like staging a play than recording an audiobook.

The final element was finding the perfect Wolverine. The criteria for an audio Wolverine is different than for an on-screen character: the actor didn’t need Hugh Jackman’s corded muscles or the ability to pull off the character’s signature hairstyle and sideburns. They needed gravel in their voice and the ability to intone rage, grief, and feral intelligence. Enter Richard Armitage, the actor who played dwarven king Thorin Oakenshield in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit adaptations.

Armitage was deeply involved and invested in the character, whom he saw as an addict, someone who couldn’t get away from getting involved and taking action in any given conflict. Percy says Armitage sent him dissertation-length emails concerning Logan, citing works like William Blake’s “Nebuchadnezzar” in his attempt to get to Wolverine’s “beastly heart.”

Armitage’s version of Wolverine is more brooding and haunted than Hugh Jackman’s take from the films, or any of the character’s previous cartoon portrayals. (His voice in the role sounds like a hungover George Clooney / Doug Ross, circa season 3 of ER.) Armitage’s first extensive scene as Logan comes in the second episode, not in a cinema-friendly gory fight sequence, but in a morose recitation of a letter he wrote to an old lover, Maureen:

I came back home and found you asleep. It was hot, remember? You weren’t wearing anything but underwear, and lying on top of the sheets. God… do you know what my mind did? I saw every organ, every vertebrae, every nerve, every artery, every bone, every way to hurt you. That’s how I look at everyone, you know.

It’s a grim thought, but in this monologue, in a matter of seconds, The Long Night gets at the core of Logan better than some multiyear comic runs ever did.

Inevitably, Wolverine comes to the foreground of the series, especially in the last three episodes. (Even the shark in Jaws didn’t stay offscreen for the whole film.) Yet when Wolverine takes center stage and the podcast becomes a bit more action-oriented, it still never loses its initial premise and style. It features more punches and explosions than Serial, but even in those moments, the series never approaches the kitsch of the old Superman and The Shadow radio plays. It always feels like the same procedural.

Marvel is keeping its cards close to the vest regarding what’s next for Wolverine’s podcast adventures, but Fink, Baker, and Percy each repeatedly referred to The Long Night as season 1 of the series, and Long Night’s final episode has a clear lead-in to a second season. Marvel is playing it even closer about plans for a Marvel Podcast Universe, but Percy let something interesting slip to Mashable’s Laura Prudom:

“We have a fun opportunity here, and that’s to create our own continuity. A continuity that will grow more and more expansive as the Marvel Podcast Universe expands,” Percy teases. “There are glimmers that people will recognize, references to Weapon X and wartime Logan, Japan and past relationships that he’s had. But he himself is not able to really work through his moth-eaten memory until the conclusion of this first season.”

And while Marvel is keeping quiet about the possibility of an MPU, it’s easy to read between the lines on Percy’s quote, the positive reception to The Long Night, and the fact that fans want more Marvel content than ever. Like 2008’s Iron Man, The Long Night was an experiment in finding an audience and setting the stage for a larger, more cohesive story. From a storytelling standpoint at the very least, it succeeded.

Whatever Marvel decides to do next, it’s clear it’s found a formula for success in audio storytelling, one that’s easily replicable and adjustable across their many properties. It’s fun to imagine Peter Parker running an investigative podcast “produced” by The Daily Bugle. Or a show where Bruce Banner, separated from the Hulk somehow, goes looking for his greener half. Or a high school drama set in the Jean Grey School for Higher Learning, or a world-touring espionage thriller starring the Black Widow. The only limit is Marvel’s imagination.


https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2018/5/30/17409704/wolverine-the-long-night-marvel-podcast-universe-interview-behind-the-scenes

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BeitragVerfasst: 20.06.2018, 22:34 
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podcast post

Podcast Post: The mid-year review

Five of our top picks from the first half of the new calendar
Shyama Krishna Kumar, Copy Editor
13:39 June 20, 2018

While it may feel like you only made and broke your New Year’s resolution yesterday, the fact of the matter is that we’re already ushering in the second half of the year and a lot has happened in the world of podcasts in that time.

While 2018 has been a fairly lukewarm year for podcasts (compared to the smashing 2017 that saw shows like S-Town, Homecoming, Ear Hustle and 36 Questions grab our eardrums), we’ve managed to pick the diamonds in the rough for you. So whether you’re relaxing at your summer getaway or beating the oppressive heat by curling up indoors, make sure you’re taking one of these shows with you for company. Happy listening.

Caliphate

What: Narrative non-fiction podcast

Released on: April 19

Narrative journalism doesn’t get better than this. Caliphate follows Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The New York Times, on her quest to understand Daesh. Joined by Radiolab veteran Andy Mills, the duo paint a disturbing but gripping picture of the world of radicalisation and put a face to the enemy the rest of the world’s been relentlessly fighting. While the show’s a lot about understanding terrorism from all its many angles, as painful as this may seem, Caliphate is also about Callimachi and her dangerous quest that often sees her put herself in the way of harm. Immaculately produced and feverishly researched, Caliphate begs to be listened to at the first opportunity.

Unspooled

What: Film review show

Released on: May 16

You may call yourself a film buff but chances are that you’re yet to get around to watching all the classics. A new podcast from Paul Scheer is here to set that right. On Unspooled, his team-up with film critic Amy Nicholson, the duo are watching the AFI’s top 100 movies of all time to find out what makes classics like Citizen Kane and Taxi Driver so special. Scheer and Nicholson dissect iconic scenes, talk to artists and industry experts, and discover just how these films got made.

This is Love

What: Non-fiction standalone stories

Released on: February 14

From the makers of the award-winning podcast Criminal, This is Love investigates life’s most persistent mystery. Stories of sacrifice, obsession, and the ways in which we bet everything on one another fill this six-part series that comes as a soothing balm for your soul at a time when we’re inundated with stories of abject horror on the news. Each story is unique and offers a fresh perspective on the ways the human race experiences this one emotion, and the ways in which it shapes our daily lives. Tune in with a cup of hot chocolate and you’re set for a few hours of auditory bliss.

Wolverine: The Long Night

What: Fiction drama

Released on: March 12

Marvel’s first venture into audio storytelling blew open wide the barriers of what a good fiction podcast can do. The 10-part series is an exercise in meticulous world-building and achingly beautiful and detailed audio production. With Wolverine: The Long Night, listeners got a chance to get inside the much-loved, adamantium-clawed mutant’s head in a way that hasn’t been done before and they largely pull it off because of lead star Richard Armitage’s superior voice acting skills. Armitage’s Logan is everything you’ve known him to be and more: vicious loner meets overzealous protector meets vulnerable man. If you are a fan of the comics, you have no excuse to not have tuned in to this beauty. Head togulfnews.com for our full review of the show.

Mission to Zyxx

What: Science fiction comedy

Released on: Season two premiered on May 30

It’s hard to satisfactorily explain what Mission to Zyxx is about, so I’m going to lazily paste the show summary here: “Mission to Zyxx follows a team of ambassadors as they attempt to establish diplomatic relations with planets in the remote and chaotic Zyxx Quadrant of the Tremillion Sector. They work for the benevolent and harmonious Federated Alliance, which has recently defeated the evil galactic monarchy. The Federated Alliance is definitely less evil.”

A happy marriage between improv comedy and science fiction, Mission to Zyxx successfully lampoons every science fiction TV show, book, or movie you’ve ever loved, and does it ever so lovingly (Even Star Wars’ iconic opening scroll isn’t spared). The show is laugh-out-loud funny and some of the episodes easily rival top network-produced sci-fi material you’re currently binge-watching on your preferred streaming service. And since it’s currently in its second season, newcomers have the added pleasure of binge-listening through Mission to Zyxx’s excellent season one.


https://m.gulfnews.com/leisure/internet/podcast-post/podcast-post-the-mid-year-review-1.2239578?utm_source=mobilesite&utm_medium=socialbar&utm_medium=socialbar&utm_campaign=twitter&utm_campaign=twitter&%2Fleisure%2Finternet%2Fpodcast-post%2Fpodcast-post-the-mid-year-review-1.2239578%2F%3Futm_source=mobilesite

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'Wolverine: The Long Night' Brings the Mystery Back Into Logan's Life

By Jamie Lovett - July 10, 2018

Marvel Entertainment took a dip into a new medium earlier this year: fictional podcasts. Their first release in this format is Wolverine: The Long Night, distributed via Stitcher Premium. If you’re wondering how one goes about translating Wolverine into an audio format, the answer is by focusing on the myth rather than the man.

The Long Night follows Wolverine to the remote town of Burns, Alaska. When a series of grisly murders strikes the area, two agents are dispatched to investigate. They quickly learn of Logan’s activities in and begin investigating further, uncovering all manner of strange secrets including cults, prophecies, and legends of otherworldly creatures.

The two agents, Sally Pierce and Tad Marshall, serve as the series’ point of view characters, which is the most surprising and interesting narrative choice that the writers of Wolverine: The Long Night make. Fans going in expecting to get inside of Wolverine’s head as he goes about being “the best he is at what he does” may want to check their expectations. That's not to say that they'll be disappointed with what they find, just that it may not be what they assumed the series would be. Wolverine is at the eye of this hurricane, but the series begins at the outer edges of the storm before making its way slowly inward.

Treating Wolverine like a force of nature and not an outright protagonist works because this also isn’t the Marvel Universe of the comics. If the X-Men, or any superhero team, exists in this version of the Marvel Universe, they aren’t mentioned at all in The Long Night. It’s also unclear how much the general public knows about mutants, and if Xavier is running a school for gifted youngsters then it’s unclear if Logan has ever heard of it.

This all helps to create the deep sense of mystery that surrounds The Long Night. Since the X-Men and Wolverine and mutants aren’t commonly known, Logan’s death-defying exploits become woven into the folklore and legends that have been passed around the Burns, Alaska community. The town practically has its own mythology in place even before Logan shows up, so when Logan does make himself known, he is made into an extension of that mythology.

The listener primarily learns of Logan's exploits by listening as locals relate their tales to Pierce and Marshall, but every storyteller has their own secrets to keep, including the agents themselves, and so every narrator is unreliable, meaning attentive listeners will be rewarded for noting the cracks in each character’s story.

Leaning into an oral storytelling tradition plays into the strengths of the audio format. It would fail on its face if not for the strength of the cast, especially Celia Keenan-Bolger and Ato Essandoh as agents Pierce and Marshall respectively. Richard Armitage also has a heavy presence as Wolverine. It’s effective and intimidating, all the more so since this Wolverine lives even more within the moral grey than his comic book counterpart, and the voice is wisely used sparingly so as not to dilute its potency.

It's all woven together by excellent sound design. Burns is a small town, but its a town, and its surrounded by the kinds of woodland someone could easily get lost in. This leaves the sound designers with the perfect tableau with which to create soundscapes of ambient noise that are somehow even more unnerving than complete silence. When the action picks up, the sound also manages to communicate the chaos that results in a way that seems more real than most superhero movies since there’s no need for elaborate or flashy choreography, just the brutal cacophony of ugly, raw combat.

Wolverine: The Long Night may not be what fans were expecting, but it is an engrossing noir tale that sets itself apart from much of what’s being done with superheroes in other mediums. There’s a surprise at the end that is lightly foreshadowed beforehand and could open up an entire universe of possibility. Anyone looking to give audio drama a try and who likes a dark, even-paced tale will find Wolverine: The Long Night is well worth investigating.

Wolverine: The Long Night is available now on Stitcher Premium and will be released for free this fall.


http://comicbook.com/marvel/2018/07/10/wolverine-the-long-night-review/?LazyLoad=On

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