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BeitragVerfasst: 07.03.2018, 01:08 
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Little Miss Gisborne
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Ganz sicher! :irre:

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Verfasst: 07.03.2018, 01:08 


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BeitragVerfasst: 07.03.2018, 01:09 
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Vielleicht fällt ihm diese Antwort ja auch wieder ein. :grins:

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BeitragVerfasst: 07.03.2018, 01:32 
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Das kann ich mir sehr gut vorstellen. :lol:

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BeitragVerfasst: 12.03.2018, 13:57 
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Arianna hat geschrieben:
Am 11. März ist Richard in Austin, Texas, in Sachen Wolverine:

"Behind The Scenes with Marvel’s Wolverine Podcast Richard Armitage Mar 11, 2018 | 3:30pm – 4:30pm
Austin Convention Center
Trade Show - Next Stage - Exhibit Hall 4"

https://schedule.sxsw.com/2018/events/PP99185

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Um was es geht? "South by Southwest® (SXSW®) Conference & Festivals celebrate the convergence of the interactive, film, and music industries. March 9 -18, 2018 | Austin, TX."

Richard hat doch nicht an dieser Veranstaltung teilgenommen, weshalb ich den eigenen Thread aufgelöst habe:

Zitat:
Stitcher@Stitcher

The Marvel Panel at #SXSW has started. No Richard Armitage, but the rest of the team is here talking #WolverinePodcast


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https://twitter.com/Stitcher/status/972934363334791169


Zum Hören gibt es hier etwas:

Zitat:
moose turds@mooseturds

Logan voiced by #RichardArmitage from #WolverinePodcast IG story #SXSW2018


https://twitter.com/mooseturds/status/972943907817508865


BTW: Ab heute geht es los mit dem Podcast:

Zitat:
'Wolverine: The Long Night' Debuts

By Jamie Lovett - March 12, 2018

Marvel and Stitcher have officially released the first two episodes of Wolverine: The Long Night, Marvel’s first scripted podcast, on Stitcher Premium.

Wolverine: The Long Night is a 10-episode series releasing weekly on Stitcher Premium. The entire series will be released on other podcast platforms in the fall.

Wolverine: The Long Night is a mystery story that incorporates the fantastical elements of the Marvel Universe. Here’s a synopsis of the story provided by Stitcher:

It follows agents Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) and Tad Marshall (Ato Essandoh) as they arrive in the fictional town of Burns, Alaska, to investigate a series of murders and quickly discover the town lives in fear of a serial killer. The agents team up with deputy Bobby Reid (Andrew Keenan-Bolger) to investigate their main suspect, Logan (Richard Armitage).Their search leads them on a fox hunt through the mysterious and corrupt town.

“This is a story about deception, unreliability, identity, atonement, and man in the wild and the wild in man,” said Ben Percy, whose comics work include Nightwing, Green Arrow, and Teen Titans, in a press release. “Every character has a secret. Every scene has a question mark at the end of it. And I can't wait for you to hear the phenomenal actors who have brought the story to life -- and the next-level sound design that make this audio drama like nothing you've ever heard. SNIKT!”

The production team of Wolverine: The Long Night also includes Brendan Baker (Love & Radio), and sound designer Chloe Prasinos (Reply All). Daniel Fink of Marvel and Jenny Radelet of Stitcher are producing the series.

"It’s been an honor to work with Marvel, Stitcher, and our entire cast and production crew to bring Wolverine’s story into audio,” said Baker. “I’m so proud of what we’ve made together, and can’t wait to finally share it—with Marvel fans and podcast fans alike. So put on a nice pair of headphones, close your eyes, and experience this Marvel story where you create the pictures in your mind."

“We are excited to officially launch Wolverine: The Long Night and bring a truly unique storytelling experience to our fans,” said Dan Silver, vice president, head of platforms and content for Marvel New Media. “We are thrilled with the enthusiasm for this project from our fans and the podcast community, and look forward to exploring the medium in the future.”

Wolverine: The Long Night Chapters 1 and 2 are now available on Stitcher Premium.


http://comicbook.com/marvel/2018/03/12/wolverine-the-long-night-podcast-release/

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BeitragVerfasst: 12.03.2018, 15:44 
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Und schon ist die erste Review da - lobende Worte über Richard:

Zitat:
podcast review
March 12, 2018 9:00 am

Wolverine: The Long Night Is a Bold Experiment for Marvel

By Nicholas Quah


Wolverine: The Long Night opens with one of my favorite creepy genre conventions: A ghost ship is found drifting off the Alaskan coast, housing a crew that met a grisly fate. Their bodies are slashed up with explosive and unnatural violence, as testified in a monologue delivered by an older fisherman whose boat unwittingly drifted into the remains of the massacre. When interviewed, he describes the scene with gory detail: “A man’s face staring back at me, eyes and mouth gaping open … split clean, red lines raked across it.”

Given that the name of Marvel’s most famous mutant prefixes the title, the probable source of these mutilations should come to no surprise. (Not since James Mangold’s truly great Logan has one been made to acutely consider the consequences of Wolverine’s claws on the human body. Damn, dude. Damn.) The narrative premise of The Long Night shouldn’t surprise, either: A pair of federal agents, Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) and Tad Marshall (Ato Essandoh), arrive in the rural Alaskan locale to investigate the killings, and our old friend Logan (The Hobbit’s Richard Armitage) quickly emerges as the prime suspect.

Of course, nothing is what it seems. The ship massacre is swiftly connected to two other deaths in the region, previously dismissed as bear attacks in the suspicious way that suggests characters who have something to hide. As we follow Pierce and Marshall through their investigation, the narrative unfolds to reveal a town in the mold of Twin Peaks. Among other things, The Long Night features small-town corruption, a powerful family, and a night-worshipping cult that probably has something to do with the deaths. The agents themselves don’t seem all that trustworthy either: They’re too shady, too incongruous, to be taken at face value. Only the first three of ten planned episodes were made available to critics for review, but it feels readily evident in these opening volleys that we’re being set up for a bit of twistiness. And that much more weirdness is on the way.

The Long Night is Marvel’s first foray into audio drama in the modern podcasting age, a production formed through a collaboration between Marvel New Media and the veteran podcast company Stitcher. Although it doesn’t break particularly new ground while injecting the electric life of a comic-book universe into contemporary audio aesthetics — not yet, anyway — it is nonetheless a successful crossover into podcasting for Marvel.

In large part a classically constructed radio drama, The Long Night is elevated by shrewd sound design (which leans deftly into natural atmospherics, letting the wind and wilderness do a good deal of scene-setting) and supremely competent direction by Brendan Baker and Chloe Prasinos. Scenes move breezily, listeners are kept effectively grounded, and action is excellently communicated — a required competency, given the superhero genre — in ways clear and compelling. I can’t wait to see what will happen when the series crescendos into its third act and works through the difficulty of presenting a mutant-driven climactic encounter purely through sound, should there be one. Such is The Long Night’s burden of being Marvel’s first modern audio drama: It is tasked with establishing a vocabulary for everything that might come after.

The script, written by up-and-coming comics scribe Benjamin Percy, is fine enough. The rural murder-mystery gambit is always a pleasure, but there are bits of clunky dialogue that eat into podcast’s compelling tone and setting. It’s also worth noting that characterizations are paper thin in these early goings, with some characters presented as little more than a melange of clichés and attitude. (Agent Sally Pierce, in particular, feels exceptionally trope-oriented.) The characters are only sporadically transcended by their performers, who pitch their voice work at a theatrical level. This is in keeping with the presentation style common in the broader universe of fiction podcasts, which means The Long Night should work for those familiar with such audio dramas but may need some getting used to for those newer to the form.

The one standout exception is Richard Armitage’s Logan. Snarling and characteristically furious, Armitage plays the Canadian brawler with a light naturalistic touch that’s well within the classic noir tradition of an outsized man hiding from the very fact of existence. This version of Wolverine is one who’s lived too long, seen too much, and killed too many — which is to say, he’s the ripest Wolverine for psychological analysis and the one most resplendent with the prospect of human drama. That said, it’s entirely possible that the strength of Armitage’s performance is the product of how Wolverine is deployed in these early installments. Logan appears with relative economy at the outset of this mystery, so we mostly experience him as a specter in other people’s stories and mythologies: He’s the new guy in town, the quiet and ferocious square of a man, the loner with unbelievable and terrifying properties. It’s Wolverine told as a ghost story, and it’s a move that works really well for a character that’s so present in the wider culture.

We’ll see where The Long Night ultimately leads us, but it’s off to a promising start. Interviews with Percy suggest that Wolverine will be foregrounded more with each successive episode, and that we’ll soon be treated to more details about this specific version of the Marvel universe. Will there be a formal Marvel Podcast Universe, as hinted in a recent Mashable write-up? Possibly, depending on how successful this project turns out to be. For what it’s worth, I’d love to hear from this world and this nexus of creative teams again. Between the gravel of Armitage’s voice, the rustling of the trees, and the snikts of blades slicing through air, the loudest sound that cuts through is the sound of potential.

Wolverine: The Longest Night is currently available on Stitcher Premium, a paid listening service, with new episodes dropping every Monday. It’s scheduled for a wider free release in the fall.

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BeitragVerfasst: 12.03.2018, 20:02 
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Noch einmal Lobendes:

Zitat:
Moment and Memory: An Interview with Brendan P. Baker and a Review of Marvel’s Wolverine: The Long Night

A conversation about directing audio fiction and bringing comics into an audio reality, plus a special review of the first episodes.

Today, Marvel and Stitcher have dropped the first two episodes of their audio fiction podcast Wolverine: The Long Night, which was first announced in December 2017. I was over the moon to be able to interview the director Brendan Patrick Baker, who is known for his award-winning production work on Love + Radio. Not only that, but Marvel sent me the first few episodes in advance so that I could write a review, which you’ll find here as well.

(The following conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.)

Let’s talk your origin story first. You are most well-known for your amazing production work on Love + Radio, and shows like This American Life and Invisibilia. Tell me a little bit about how you got there and what was involved in those roles.

My educational background is in English and music and public radio was a good place to combine both of those skills. I’ve been working in and around the public radio podcast world for a little over a decade, primarily as a freelancer and specializing in, for lack of a better word, what I would call “creative engineering”: using audio engineering techniques for creative ends. When I started working with Nick van der Kolk on Love + Radio, our first cooperation together was the episode “The Wisdom of Jay Thunderbolt”, which to our shock ended up winning the Third Coast Gold Award for 2011. We got to be on what feels to me like the cutting edge of podcasting at the time. When I left the show, I already had an interest in audio fiction because there are some exciting possibilities about what can be done. Audio fiction feels like it’s another one of those cutting edge fronts.

You were the sound engineer behind Mac Rogers’ The Message. How did working on that audio drama help inform your work on Wolverine?

That was my first involvement in a fictional audio project. It became the experimentation ground for a lot of the techniques that I would up using in Wolverine: The Long Night. In both cases, we were trying to use the tools, approaches, and the sound vocabulary I’ve developed in my other work, and apply it to a purely fictional universe. There’s a lot of exciting stuff happening out there in audio fiction and the cool thing is that there’s no real set of rules. I remember when I first got into podcasting, I was told, “oh, there are all these rules you have to follow and this is how you do radio storytelling.” This is something I’ve resisted over the years, and Nick and I both resisted with Love + Radio, and here it just feels we’re trying new techniques that worked really well.

Brendan has never produced anything that I would consider “standard”, and Wolverine is another experiment that has, so far, paid off. I listened to these episodes for the first time in the dark, eyes closed, headphones on, and I could hear the echoes of his work on Love + Radio and The Message in it. Do not listen to this without headphones, because the experience of Brendan and assistant director Chloe Prasinos’ production magic will be lost to you. The very idea of that possibility is disappointing to me.

Since you bring up this subject about rules in audio storytelling, I’d love to briefly talk about talk about the distinctions and similarities you’ve identified in direction & production with nonfiction versus fiction storytelling.

It’s a different set of challenges. This is the first time that I’ve been the director of actors. I realized that there are a lot of similarities between being a director and being a good radio reporter. You’re sitting down with someone, looking into their story in very close detail, you’re asking questions, and getting an understanding of what’s happened to them. In some sense, that’s what’s happening here.

When we got the early script drafts from Ben Percy, Chloe and I would sit down and think “what is happening to these characters, what are they experiencing?” One of the things I did was make rough cuts of the episodes with Chloe and I acting out all the roles, which we then sent to Ben. This was part of the collaborative experimental process in figuring out how to best present these stories in an audio-only framework. When it came time to work with actors, it was very similar and every step of the way we were trying to achieve a fuller understanding.

Something we’re able to do in the audio fiction context is play with time. Here we are, following two agents who go to Alaska to investigate a series of murders. As people are telling them their story, we get the shift of being in the room with the agents and whoever they’re talking to and then going into their subject’s head, in the kind of way we did with Love + Radio. They’re telling their story and then all of a sudden the environment and reality surrounding them falls away and you just hear their voice and as they’re telling their story, other sound design blossoms around them. In Love + Radio, that was sort of a creator reenactment of someone’s experience. Here, it’s their memory, their story, their subjective experience. We’re able to oscillate between these two modes, objective and subjective, past and present, throughout the series to create these different puzzle pieces that shape the whole picture of what’s happening in Burns.

One of the things we’re trying to do from the sound design perspective is replicate the way sound works in the real world. Like, there’s a protest out on the street and we build the whole sound of the protest happening, the crowd, someone on the bullhorn, and then the way the listener first encounters that audio is through a YouTube clip. You’ll hear the filtration of the YouTube clip playing on someone’s computer in a room and then you go into the computer and the perspective shifts and now you’re there on the street with all these people.

When I was first imagining this moment-memory shift Brendan described, I did so with a silly whooshing sound effect like you’d find in a cheesy procedural, but this team has created something smooth, effortless, and enveloping. It’s truly immersive. Brendan’s experience and background shows in a way that will make your world melt away into fiction, just the same as happens in the shift between past and present.

This drama started out like I expect mysteries to start out: gruesome and cruel and dark, all bleeding out under the surface of a series of murders that need to be solved. A plot setting and conceit we are used to witnessing, but then developed into a soundscape that breathes new life and new meaning into it. The use of the ambisonic microphones and recording on location is inspired; they made me think I was chasing and being chased, that I was in a room or a car or a forest I’ve never seen. But sometimes, that soundscape can be overwhelming. I got lost in it, occasionally to the point where I had to rewind and refocus my attention on what the characters were actually saying. It is possible that this is the result of overproduction — there’s a lot happening and stacked together, there’s music, and sound effects, and environment — but even so, the design makes the moments when all the background drops out and rolls back in, a piece at a time, that much more impactful.

I saw that your writer was influenced Serial and True Detective. Tell me a little about your influences on this podcast in terms of sound design.

If you’re a podcaster, you’re always thinking about how the heavy hitters have presented their work, but from the sound design perspective, I don’t think I had a particular template in mind. I wanted the script to tell me what it needed and I had some concepts I wanted to work with. I was interested in how you present a scene in an objective versus a subjective way and how you use intercutting between past and present. Built into Wolverine’s character is this question of memory and reliability, because in canon his memory has been wiped or he has a memory implant or he’s injured and the trauma will wipe the memory, so there was a really interesting platform already present to start playing with these ideas. That’s where I went to first: what does the storytelling need and how can I use what the story is telling me to present it in an interesting sound design way. I can get kind of high concept as I talk about these techniques I want to achieve but ultimately they have to serve the story otherwise there’s no point.

While I was researching, I found you and writer Benjamin Percy talking about the balance between having an action-heavy hero and creating an audio drama. What can we expect from The Long Night sound-design wise, in terms of action scenes versus tension-building, like the kind we find in a lot of mystery and horror audio?

I will say: we do have fight scenes! That was one of the first questions that came up: Wolverine is such an amazing character, but how do you do a fight scene in audio? Or maybe another question is “should you do a fight scene in audio?”. And the feeling was “yes, yes, we should!” But maybe the fight scenes aren’t what anchor the series. Maybe it’s that the kind of tension we need to build into the overall story doesn’t revolve around two characters fighting, but revolves around internal conflict that Logan is wrestling with.

From day one my approach to the fight scenes was “let’s treat it more impressionistically,” like a piece of music. Deru does the composition for our score, with additional contributions by Max Spransy. Each piece of music has its own tracks broken out, and Chloe and I can deconstruct the music and use each piece selectively, so the music shifts in coordination with whatever is happening on stage. It’s this collage compositional process, deciding when to take a bit of ambience out of the mix or the rhythm of different sound effects, even when it’s not really music. In those moments, it’s more like a descent into chaos and the music builds around you and there’s a rhythm to the confrontation. This is one of the cool things about audio fiction: the strength and the power comes from the listener’s imagining of all of these worlds themselves. The audio is the scaffolding for someone else’s imagination, but the listeners are the ones really building it.

Music is one of the first things I zoom in on when I’m listening to audio fiction, and Deru and Spransy have not disappointed. Whether it’s subtle and built into the soundscape or attention-grabbing, the music has familiar threads looped all the way through so that it’s cohesive, but not so that you feel you’re listening to the same loop. Many of the moments in which my heart raced or my body felt unquiet were because of the music building up above or hovering amid the environmental sounds.

I read that you were recording on location for Wolverine. What was it like to direct that and what did it involve?

We recorded in two studios and a summer camp on location in Westchester. The way we recorded this entire series is with a special mic called an ambisonic, or sound field mic. It’s a single microphone that has four different mic elements pointing in different directions and that allows us to record a sphere of sound, but also present sound in a way means the listener can hear things happening all around them. It also allows us to surgically pinpoint certain characters in space and then, in the edit room, focus in on people almost like it were a camera. That opened up all sorts of possibilities about how we were presenting characters, but when recording on location, there were bunch of challenges that came with it too. If there are a lot of leaves, you can hear them crunching underneath or if an airplane was going overhead, you aren’t able to hide from the airplane. And whereas with an digital mic you can mask those things by putting the quieter part of the mic where the noisier part of the leaves are, we weren’t able to do that. A lot of the outdoor scenes were meticulously edited to make sure we were getting something that sounded like being in the forest in Alaska, and then we used those recordings with a mixture of ambient sounds and sound effects to build out the whole sound design.

The other cool thing, especially with the outdoor scenes, is that you have a really long depth of field. You can have character being farther back in the wood and really get the feeling that they’re in the distance rather than having everything and every voice be close miked. And this whole approach allows the actors to be these characters in the moment: they interact with each other, you hear them moving around in space, and it’s not a traditional radio drama where someone’s in front of a microphone and they’re sitting at a table, you really get a sense of motion and blocking. We actually have charts of the blocking notes — like someone enters a door and then has to be at this desk by this line and other character enters — and that was really fun to map out pre-production.

Going into The Long Night knowing they used blocking charts, I could hear how it impacted the sound design and the way the characters interact. It sounds beautifully natural, as though the actors have been unchained from reality itself. Everyone, cast and crew alike, has brought their A-game to this show, to create a small town where everyone has secrets — especially our protagonists. Celia Keegan-Bolger and Ato Essandoh are the voices behind my new favorite mysterious detective duo, Agents Sally Pierce and Tad Marshall.

Let’s talk a little about Logan the character and the X-Men universe. From the setting and set-up in the trailer, it sounds like we’re in territory close to Logan’s iconic origin story, what with the references to his memory loss. What does a listener need to know about Logan and the X-Men continuity?

I think a listener can go into the series without knowing anything about the X-Men or the larger canon. Fans of the canon and of the comics will certainly recognize details and be rewarded with references but this is also meant for a general audience and so I think you can approach it from both of those levels. And in terms of canon and continuity, Marvel freed us from being beholden to a specific canon or specific storylines so this is a Logan who has different experiences. It’s the same character but in a different universe than the comics.

Logan is a character with a wide range of roles over time in the comics. He’s been a spy, a mentor, a samurai, a wild man in the Canadian wilderness, and the trailer seems to be teasing this “savage” loner from this last one. What aspects of Logan’s character will this show explore?

The idea behind the series is to mystify him a little more; he is a very well known character but the way this story is presented, the people in this town of Burns and the agents are learning things about him as they go and the listeners will be learning things about him as they proceed as well. One of the things Marvel mentioned to me is because Logan has such a rich history, you can drop him in any one of these environments and see how he reacts. So you’re going to have to listen to find out!

I can do that!

Richard Armitage brings a new, and yet familiar Logan to audio. You shouldn’t expect a large Logan presence in the first few episodes — he’s the mystery, he’s an unknown factor, but every time he comes into your ears, it’s exciting. The first time he speaks, there’s a tense build-up to it and you’ll be at the edge of your seat to witness Armitage’s vocal talents. And trust me, if you’re skeptical about Wolverine being anyone other than Hugh Jackman: don’t be. Armitage does a spectacular job of recreating Wolverine, his own Logan, without throwing what is essential to the wayside: he is gruff, and snarling, and dangerous, but aching and furious and persecuted. In episode 2, he breaks my heart. That’s too soon to be breaking my heart, Richard, we still have 8 more episodes.

One last thing. I like to open up the floor at the end of my interviews — what’s something you’d like to ask me or tell me that we haven’t touched on?

If there’s any one part we didn’t really talk about, I feel thankful to have the cast that we had. Our cast came from many different places throughout the acting community and having such a diverse crew of people, they really brought different strengths to the table. I learned so much from working with them and it feels like they had a fun time, so I hope we see more of this kind of acting, acting for an audio only production.

I will be following along with The Long Night during its release schedule this spring. Sally and Tad and Logan and someone named Bobby (who you will love, I promise) have all captured my imagination and my adoration. I want to be in Burns, Alaska for a while longer. I want it to give up its secrets. I want to experience those moments and memories. The podcast will run for a total of ten episodes, first on Stitcher Premium and then go for a wide release across all platforms in fall of 2018.

The Bello Collective is a publication + newsletter about podcasts and the audio industry. Our goal is to bring together writers, journalists, and other voices who share a passion for the world of audio storytelling.

Subscribe to the Bello Collective weekly newsletter for more stories, podcast recommendations, audio industry news, and more. Support our work and join our community by becoming a member.


https://bellocollective.com/moment-and-memory-an-interview-with-brendan-p-e48d15cb0c11


Allgemeines:

Zitat:
arley Locke
culture
03.12.18
07:00 am

Wolverine's Got a Podcast, and Sound Design Has Never Mattered More



There's an ongoing series of disturbing murders in Burns, Alaska, and investigators are frustrated. The killer hasn’t been seen, hasn't been heard. He leaves his victims sliced and dismembered, but Special Agents Tad Marshall and Sally Pierce can’t ever seem to get to the crime scene in time to see his claws. Or to hear their snikt.

Wolverine: The Long Night, a partnership between Marvel and podcast platform Stitcher, premieres today. But Marvel’s first scripted podcast doesn’t sound like a comic. There are no THWOOOMs here, no KRAKKs. It’s a moody, atmospheric detective thriller, taking cues from Homecoming’s flashbacks and S-Town’s anti-pastoral and Love + Radio’s emotional immersion.

And as in many thrillers, the man behind the mayhem is nowhere to be found. The story of why Logan (voiced by Richard Armitage) is hiding in rural Alaska is told not by him, but by the people of Burns: the dismissive sheriff (Scott Adsit), the cult leader (Brian Stokes Mitchell), grizzled local fishermen and feral children. Agent Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) and fidget-spinner-obsessed Agent Marshall (Ato Essandoh) gain an understanding of Wolverine with flashbacks and letters and harrowing phone calls—but through much of the series, they don’t see him. Instead, like the listeners, they only hear him.

It's a fitting means of reaffirming the mystique of a character who’s more than a few years in the pop-culture spotlight. “We wanted to mystify him again,” says Benjamin Percy, a novelist and comics writer who penned the podcast. “He has a tremendous offstage mythology.” Working with a character of few words in a medium with no visuals, he decided to reintroduce Wolverine by keeping him in the shadows. “There’s suspense and tense atmosphere built into an audio drama, because you’re unable to see all around you,” he says. “By eliminating vision, we can take advantage of the disorientation.”

But listening to The Long Night feels anything but disorienting—especially if you’re listening in headphones. That’s due to the work of director Brendan Baker, who recorded the series with ambisonic microphones. By using four attached mics to record in a sphere, Baker was able to situate the characters’ conversations in three-dimensional space. You hear when Sheriff Ridge leans back in his chair, or when Deputy Bobby Reid turns to the backseat to address Agent Marshall.

“We can pinpoint characters like you’d focus a camera,” says Baker, who previously worked as a producer for Love + Radio, a podcast which often feels like parachuting directly into a stranger’s consciousness. “You can use audience depth-of-field tricks: you’ll hear the reverberations of a character around you in space, before the reverbs fall away and the audio gets focused, like a camera zooming in.” As a character starts to tell a story, the audio frequencies shift; as they focus in on the memory, it shifts again.

Creating a consistent physical world required a recording process more like a play than a podcast. After Percy wrote a script, Baker and assistant director Chloe Prasinos would physically act out the episode. “There’s a parallel series where Chloe and I play all the characters,” says Baker. “Then we could understand when a character hasn’t spoken for a minute and we forget he’s in the room, or add more signposting to the top of a scene to clarify where we are in time and space.”

Once they got to the sound studios (as well as exterior locations like the Wagon Road Camp, a Westchester summer camp that provided the ambient sounds of the harsh Alaskan wilderness), they blocked out each scene, taking 360-degree photos of each imagined "set" to ensure the squad car and the sheriff’s office had the same dimensions across episodes. “We’d make little football charts: ‘this character is here, at this point they have to be here,’” says Baker. The process meant actors could move around a space known to the audience, stepping out onto a porch or walking on a gravel pathway. “So many radio dramas require their actors sit at a table in a studio in front of a nice microphone, which gives a static quality to the sound,” says Baker. “I wanted the actors to be freed up to move around in space and be the characters.”

Depending on how you feel about characters walking around your head, it can be jarring to be so well-oriented in a world you can’t see, like hiding under a table and straining to hear what’s going on around you. But it successfully creates an uneasy interiority, which offers an answer to the tricky challenge of audio action. “If you’re writing a scene in which a fight takes place, the centerpiece of every comics issue, how do you relay that to an audience if they can’t see the kas and the high kicks?” says Percy. “You create a lived-in sensory experience.” You don’t hear a victim’s death, but because you know the tentative young deputy, his shocked descriptions of finding a mutilated body are effective.

By moving away from action, the podcast loses some of the physicality of a comic. In fact, in the podcast’s first three episodes, the action is all related to the audience after the fact. But The Long Night also manages to place the listener truly within the story, as you develop a sense of the town of Burns—and begin to search for Logan in spaces you know well.


https://www.wired.com/story/wolverine-long-night-podcast/

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In seinen Promotweets zitiert Richard auch die letzte Review (natürlich die, in der er nicht ausdrücklich lobend erwähnt wird - man(n) kann es mit Zurückhaltung aber auch übertreiben :irre: ) zum Start von 'Wolverine':

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https://twitter.com/RCArmitage/status/973231527403442176

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https://twitter.com/RCArmitage/status/973234380180213761

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Zitat:

‘Wolverine’ Podcast Review: Logan Lets Others Do the Talking, and It Works


Logan was never much for words, but that doesn’t hurt Marvel’s first podcast
Tim Molloy | Last Updated: March 12, 2018 @ 4:00 PM


With his squat stature, thick muttonchops and gravity-defying hair — plus his penchant for popping shiny claws while flying gnash-teethed at his enemies — Wolverine is among the most visually arresting superheroes. Podcasting might seem like the wrong medium for one of his stories.

Yes, Superman was a radio star years before he appeared in movie serials, on TV, and finally, in multiplexes. But that’s because no one had figured out how to use film to make you believe a man can fly. Now they have. Which means “Wolverine: The Long Night” has to do something the many “X-Men” and solo “Wolverine” movies haven’t. And fortunately it does.

Rather than build a podcast around Wolverine, “Wolverine: The Long Night” works him into the already established tropes of the relatively fresh medium. Stories about mysteries, small-town murders, and especially small-town murder mysteries have thrived in podcasting, maybe because a podcast is one of the only genres almost always consumed on the go: in a car, on a run, in the midst of a chore. The progress we make in the narrative pleasantly parallels our own motion.

“Wolverine: The Long Night” — Marvel’s first foray into podcasting — doesn’t rely on Wolverine to keep things moving. In fact, it’s willing to slow-burn its way to his first appearance, even at the risk of losing us. It won’t, of course, because we know — and the podcast knows — that we’ll stick around for the first Wolverine sighting. Or at least the first sound of him.

The Wolverine podcast follows the first rule of monster movies — don’t show us the beast too soon — and instead describes lots of carnage that may or may not be Wolverine’s grisly work product.

Wolverine — identified here only by his Christian name, Logan — is barely mentioned in the first episode, which astutely gambles that we know enough about his powers (claws, rapid healing ability, heightened senses, mutant speed and strength) and personality (grumpy, but on the side of the righteous) to bring our own assumptions to every story he’s in.

This time, he’s tooling around a forgotten corner of Alaska. And like many of the best Marvel stories about Logan, this one doesn’t fit into any particularly established timeline. Wolverine just kind of pops up in strange places at strange times, usually tracking someone, usually eager to be left alone.

People start turning up dead pretty much immediately in the first episode — from injuries that sound kind of claw-inflicted — but they don’t especially sound like the usual suspects Logan tends to kill. Has Wolverine gone berserk? Is he being framed? Assuming these murders are Logan’s claw-work, how do they square with his code?

Speaking of codes: “Wolverine” follows one of comic-book adaptations that I don’t really love — one that holds that in order for a superhero story to be taken seriously, it needs to hold off on anything fun for as long as possible.

It can feel, in the first episode, like the podcast is going too far to prove how little it’s going to rely on its hairy antihero. But the time it spends developing other characters seems likely to be worth it. Three episodes were made available to critics for review, and by the end of the third, I appreciated all the time spent on character- and world-building by Benjamin Percy, the writer who scripted “The Long Night.”

The leads include two government agents (Celia Keenan-Bolger and Ato Essandoh), a callow deputy (Andrew Keenan-Bolger), and isolated sheriff (“30 Rock” vet Scott Adsit). We may know Wolverine better than they do, after all these years of comics and “X-Men” movies. Or they may be holding back how much they know. Either way, there’s an interesting meta-narrative at work. We don’t just learn alongside them, but also bring our own assumptions. Sometimes we want to yell at the characters, like people in a movie theater yelling at a screen: It wasn’t just a bear attack! It was a wolverine!

There is also, of course, a cult. Cults both real and fictional are becoming a stock element of podcasts, and “The Long Night” has created one of the cooler ones. No one is as interesting as cult leader Nicholas Prophet (Tony winner Brian Stokes Mitchell, seen recently on “Mr. Robot”). He’s the most delightful kind of ham, a subtle one, who chews up the scenery we can only immune.

“Wolverine: The Long Night” generally makes good use of its lack of visuals. One particular locale, sonically rendered through hollow sounds and drips, is darker and scarier in my mind than I can imagine it being on TV or film.

And what of “Logan” himself? He’s played by Richard Armitage, who some Logan superfans have fantasycast as a replacement for Hugh Jackman given his exit from the character. By the end of the third episode I felt like Armitage at least had Logan’s voice down cold. And that’s all that matters here, isn’t it?

The Wolverine podcast, “Wolverine: The Long Night,” is available on Stitcher. If that sounds complicated, here’s rundown on how to listen.


https://www.thewrap.com/wolverine-podcast-review-logan-lets-others-do-the-talking-and-it-works/


Zitat:
Wolverine podcast has a Minnesota backstory
Arts & Culture
Euan Kerr · Mar 12, 2018
A new podcast featuring Wolverine has a Northfield author
When Marvel Comics decided to branch out to podcasts as a new storytelling platform, it turned to a Northfield author who identified with the character he'd be writing.

These words in the first episode of a new podcast released today may set comic-book fans' hearts racing:

"What was his name?" asks a detective.

"Logan," a strained voice replies. "His name was Logan."

That's the given name of Wolverine, an iconic Marvel Comics character whose weaponized body can sprout razor-sharp claws.

When Marvel decided to create its first podcast, it turned to Minnesota author Benjamin Percy. In reply, his proposal ran to 30 single-spaced pages.

"It was basically subtitled 'Give this to me or else,'" he said.

Percy lives in Northfield. He writes literary fiction, leaning toward horror and science fiction. He's also been pumping out a host of comic books for the last couple of years; He recently finished a run on "Green Arrow," and is now taking up "Nightwing."

But writing Wolverine, Percy said — well, that's something special.

"As a grumpy, smelly, hairy, cigar-chomping, whiskey-swilling loner, this is a character I have long related to — a little too well," he said in his trademark gravel-bass voice.

And there was another attractive challenge. The podcast world has exploded in recent years, but most podcasts are nonfiction. Marvel Comics, which has become a major force in the film industry, is looking for a piece of the podcast pie.

"We are hopefully innovators in this medium, in that there haven't been that many audio dramas, fiction audio dramas," said Percy.

"Wolverine: The Long Night" will play out over 10 half-hour episodes. The first two were released Monday. The rest will follow at weekly intervals.

Percy set the story in the fictional town of Burns, Alaska. Miles out at sea on a freezing night, someone — or something — has massacred a fishing boat's entire crew. Two FBI agents arrive to investigate.

"Found bladed gouges on wood and metal alike, indicating a supernaturally high-tensile-strength weapon," reports one detective, after combing the crime scene. "In the engine room I found and bagged a spent cigar, so we can fare that off to the lab for testing. The lifeboat was still there, so, what? He either had a vessel, or he swam, which would seem impossible given the distance and conditions ... except ... ."

"Except for who we might be dealing with," interrupts his colleague.

"Yeah, except for that, yeah," the first detective sighs.

"This is the Wild West of storytelling," said Percy. "We were inventing the rules as we went along."

While dramas used to be a staple of radio broadcasting, they have been a much smaller part of podcasting. Marvel hired a top-flight cast, including Richard Armitage, best known as Thorin in "The Hobbit" trilogy, as Wolverine. They recorded on sound sets and then used sound design techniques to create a 3D experience on headphones.

Percy created a script aimed at intriguing and terrifying an adult audience. He drew on several inspirations, including the popular Serial and S-town podcasts.

"I saw a lot of potential in this investigative piece, where these FBI agents are sitting down with people and interrogating them," he said. "And what actually happened is in direct conflict, sometimes, with what they are being told."

Percy said he also drew on parts of the first season of "True Detective" and from Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven."

Wolverine debuted in the comics in 1974. Percy worries most film depictions — other than the recent "Logan" — have made him, as he puts it, a little too cuddly.

"He's been in the spotlight, and I wanted to put him in the shadows," he said. "I wanted to re-mystify him. You should know this character has holes in his head. He has been mindwiped so many times that he's not sure what is real and what is not real. He only knows he has done terrible things and he's trying to escape them."

Percy hopes "Wolverine: The Long Night" will attract podcast listeners looking for something new, as well as comic book fans and literature lovers. The series is available through the Stitcher subscription service.

Given the Marvel Universe's wealth of characters, it's natural to ask if there are more podcasts on the way. Percy just smiles and says he can neither confirm nor deny that.

"The Weapon X assassins would be after me, " he said.


https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/03/12/wolverine-podcast-has-minnesota-backstory


Zitat:
Listen to Chapter 1 of Marvel's new 'Wolverine: The Long Night' scripted podcast

Brian Silliman
@briansilliman
Mar 12, 2018


"Logan. His name was Logan."

Marvel has officially entered the ever-growing world of scripted podcasts, with the first story, Wolverine: The Long Night, now available for listening. Even better, Chapter 1 of the new tale is available for free, right here at Stitcher.

If you want to go in completely cold, go and have a listen— if you don't mind some thoughts (and mild spoilers) then keep reading!

One major aspect of this first chapter is that Wolverine himself is barely in it. He only appears very briefly during a flashback scene, and though it might be a bit odd to have the title character not show up in your inaugural episode, Wolverine is very much a presence throughout the entire thing.

Set in Alaska, the story begins as a crabber discovers a bunch of slashed-up bodies. He reports the incident to a couple of agents, and they make the same guess that we do— the marks left on the victims sound just like the work of a pair of adamantium claws. These aren't the only murders that have gone down here, either— there are plenty more, and they all bear the same signs. While the agents seem to know who they're dealing with, the residents of this particular Alaskan town most certainly do not. All they know if that everything is somehow tied to a short, square, hairy stranger who arrived on their docks sometime earlier.

The premonitions come hard and fast, and soon it's not a matter of whether or not Wolverine is the one performing these murders— it's a question of why. We don't get any answers, of course... this is just Chapter 1, and it widely serves to introduce the mystery as well as the town. The atmospheric way that the show was recorded is very effective, as is the voice cast which includes Scott Adsit, Ato Essandoh, and Brian Stokes Mitchell (playing a cult leader, who is bound to have more importance later on). Though series lead Richard Armitage only gets one line as Wolverine, he. Is. Perfect.


If the goal of this first chapter was to have people come back for more, then it's bound to be a successful strategy. We're already highly curious about what the heck is going on in that town, and what the heck is going on with our dear friend Logan.

Listen to the first episode for yourself at Stitcher for free right now, bub!


http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/chapter-1-of-new-wolverine-the-long-night-scripted-podcast


Zitat:
io9 Reviews

Wolverine: The Long Night Is the X-Men Crime Drama Podcast I Never Knew I Wanted

Beth Elderkin
Yesterday 4:30pm

Marvel has ventured into the podcastiverse with Wolverine: The Long Night, an SVU-style crime drama complete with cults, a serial killer, and Easter eggs for X-Men fans. It’s clearly for a specific audience that enjoys comic book stories, podcasts, and true crime. Luckily, I sit at the center of that Venn Diagram, so needless to say, I’m into it.

The first 10-episode season of Wolverine: The Long Night debuts today on Stitcher, written by Ben Percy (The Wilding, Red Moon) and directed by Brendan Baker. As of writing this, I’ve listened to three episodes, and things are off on a promising (albeit imperfect) note. The podcast follows federal agents Tad Marshall (At Essandoh) and Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) as they investigate a bloody massacre that took place on a fishing boat off the coast of Burns, Alaska. All claws seem to point to Logan (Richard Armitage, who played Thorin in The Hobbit films), who’s on the run from Weapon X and struggling to regain his memories. But as the story develops, things get complicated, more murders pop up, a mysterious cult comes into the mix, and the local sheriff seems strangely determined to get the agents out of his town.

The first thing you’ll notice about Wolverine: The Long Night is how old-school it is. The podcast has been compared to Serial, the incredibly popular true crime podcast hosted by This American Life’s Sarah Koenig, but being fiction, it’s more akin to A Prairie Home Companion. You’re not listening to the personal logs of a reporter or investigator as they uncover the mystery, like Limetown or Tanis. It’s treated like an audioplay, and the podcast weaves between scenes, moments, and characters. But our knowledge is limited—we’re learning right alongside the protagonists.

Most of the characters are interesting, though some fall into crime drama stereotypes. Marshall and Pierce are definitely doing the Good Cop/Bad Cop thing. Marshall is more engaging, coming across as direct but sincere, while Pierce’s take on the no-nonsense “don’t make me grab the cuffs” badass gets a little silly at times. The best so far is, of course, Richard Armitage as Wolverine. We haven’t heard much of him yet, but Armitage has an excellent take on the X-Men hero, coming across as exhausted, miserable, and in desperate need of some hope. Logan is a complicated character, and Hugh Jackman’s portrayal is iconic, but Armitage really holds his own. My only complaint is that he’s not really a central part of the story, at least not yet. He’s more of a plot device.

The villain appears to be the leader of the Avalon cult, Nicholas Prophet (Brain Stokes Mitchell), who leans heavily into every “I run a crazy cult” trope you can think of (he burned off his fingerprints; who does that?). The whole cult thing is kind of a mixed bag. On one hand, I’m fascinated with stories about cults and Avalon is a nifty one. It’s just so creepy! It’s a lot of fun uncovering more about what its members are up to, especially given how they’re an original storyline not from the comics. And yet, there’s something off about it I can’t quite get into. It’s not so much the cult itself, but how it exists in this world the podcast has created—the town doesn’t care nearly as much as it should that there’s a cult nearby sacrificing chickens, and possibly people. But the people in town also seem to have no idea mutants exist (at least so far). There’s always a chance this is part of the larger mystery and will be explained down the road, but right now I can’t get a grasp on it. Unless it turns out everyone is in the cult, this might end up feeling a tad disappointing.

That’s not to say I’m not into the podcast. I am! I think it’s a lot of fun, even if it’s got issues. In the end, I think the best indicator for a narrative podcast—really, any kind of story—is how much you care about finding out what’s going to happen next. And right now, I’m really interested in what’s down the road for Wolverine: The Long Night. It might not be perfect, and some of the characters and setups might verge on the ridiculous, but it’s exciting to experience a comic book universe story in this format. I don’t know how successful it’s going to be, or whether it will actually launch a Marvel Podcast Universe, but I admire them for trying—and I’m very glad they did it.


https://io9.gizmodo.com/wolverine-the-long-night-is-the-x-men-crime-drama-podc-1823594596?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_twitter&utm_source=io9_twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

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Zum Start der offizielle Trailer:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRhweo_ONzQ

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Und noch einmal:

Zitat:
Debuts Online

By

Simon Andrews
Published on March 15, 2018

Ever since Hugh Jackman filmed his (allegedly) final scenes as Logan last year, online media has been saturated with proposals and theories about who Marvel will eventually find to replace the actor in future Wolverine projects. The fact that the studio went and purchased back the rights to the iconic mutant and his fellow X-men in the immediate aftermath of Jackman’s onscreen death only increased the levels of speculation. Well, this week does indeed see the debut of anther Hollywood A-Lister as the infamous Marvel anti-hero, with Richard Armitage playing Logan in an exciting Marvel venture, Wolverine: The Long Night.

The company have joined up with podcast platform Stitcher (where you can find the first two episodes) to record a a new audio serial featuring Armitage‘s version of the legendary character. Described by as an intriguing hybrid that lies somewhere between a podcast and an audiobook, the project saw Armitage and his fellow performers given space in the studio to move around freely, in an effort to add to the physical and violent aspects that naturally accompany the storyline.

It’s the first scripted audio work that Marvel have ever attempted, and is intended to form yet another new parallel universe to their existing collection. If successful, it is proposed that the 10 episode run would then be used to launch more audio work, and lay the basis for a new Marvel Podcast Universe. This would then run alongside the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and the accompanying X-Verse, opening the door for some intriguing possible crossover adventures.

Pitched as a noir-crime thriller, the story again sees Logan confused and alone, on the run from his Weapon X masters. The first two installments of the show have now landed online, and in the few seconds on airtime that Armitage has appeared in so far, he has totally nailed the character. With the perfect level of necessary growl and heavy breathing, it’s easy to visualize him as the conflicted Canadian mutant, and may even be the stepping stone that the British actor needs for the much coveted MCU version of the character.

The synopsis for the story is as follows:

The town of Burns, Alaska has been rocked by a series of gruesome murders. The bodies have been sliced and dismembered, and a pair of police detectives are at a loss on how to find the killer. But earlier, residents had spotted a short, hairy man near the docks.

The aforementioned cops are played by Celia Keenan Bolger (The Mist) and Ato Essandoh (Altered Carbon), bringing an X-Files dynamic to sit alongside the existing X-Men material. And whilst no other mutants have been revealed to be a part of the story, the supposition that Logan is not responsible for the murder suggests that at least one other powered mutant will have been revealed by the end of proceedings. (Which you just know it’s going to be Sabretooth…)

Head on over to Stitcher now, and listen to the first two episodes that are now available, then let us know what you think…

“Killing’s a sin, right? So I’m a sinner…”


https://www.screengeek.net/2018/03/15/wolverine-the-long-night-debuts-online/

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Noch einmal viel Lob für Richard und der Wunsch nach mehr:

Zitat:
io9 Reviews

Wolverine: The Long Night Is the X-Men Crime Drama Podcast I Never Knew I Wanted


Beth Elderkin
3/12/18 4:30pm

Marvel has ventured into the podcastiverse with Wolverine: The Long Night, an SVU-style crime drama complete with cults, a serial killer, and Easter eggs for X-Men fans. It’s clearly for a specific audience that enjoys comic book stories, podcasts, and true crime. Luckily, I sit at the center of that Venn Diagram, so needless to say, I’m into it.

The first 10-episode season of Wolverine: The Long Night debuts today on Stitcher, written by Ben Percy (The Wilding, Red Moon) and directed by Brendan Baker. As of writing this, I’ve listened to three episodes, and things are off on a promising (albeit imperfect) note. The podcast follows federal agents Tad Marshall (At Essandoh) and Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) as they investigate a bloody massacre that took place on a fishing boat off the coast of Burns, Alaska. All claws seem to point to Logan (Richard Armitage, who played Thorin in The Hobbit films), who’s on the run from Weapon X and struggling to regain his memories. But as the story develops, things get complicated, more murders pop up, a mysterious cult comes into the mix, and the local sheriff seems strangely determined to get the agents out of his town.

The first thing you’ll notice about Wolverine: The Long Night is how old-school it is. The podcast has been compared to Serial, the incredibly popular true crime podcast hosted by This American Life’s Sarah Koenig, but being fiction, it’s more akin to A Prairie Home Companion. You’re not listening to the personal logs of a reporter or investigator as they uncover the mystery, like Limetown or Tanis. It’s treated like an audioplay, and the podcast weaves between scenes, moments, and characters. But our knowledge is limited—we’re learning right alongside the protagonists.

Most of the characters are interesting, though some fall into crime drama stereotypes. Marshall and Pierce are definitely doing the Good Cop/Bad Cop thing. Marshall is more engaging, coming across as direct but sincere, while Pierce’s take on the no-nonsense “don’t make me grab the cuffs” badass gets a little silly at times. The best so far is, of course, Richard Armitage as Wolverine. We haven’t heard much of him yet, but Armitage has an excellent take on the X-Men hero, coming across as exhausted, miserable, and in desperate need of some hope. Logan is a complicated character, and Hugh Jackman’s portrayal is iconic, but Armitage really holds his own. My only complaint is that he’s not really a central part of the story, at least not yet. He’s more of a plot device.

The villain appears to be the leader of the Avalon cult, Nicholas Prophet (Brain Stokes Mitchell), who leans heavily into every “I run a crazy cult” trope you can think of (he burned off his fingerprints; who does that?). The whole cult thing is kind of a mixed bag. On one hand, I’m fascinated with stories about cults and Avalon is a nifty one. It’s just so creepy! It’s a lot of fun uncovering more about what its members are up to, especially given how they’re an original storyline not from the comics. And yet, there’s something off about it I can’t quite get into. It’s not so much the cult itself, but how it exists in this world the podcast has created—the town doesn’t care nearly as much as it should that there’s a cult nearby sacrificing chickens, and possibly people. But the people in town also seem to have no idea mutants exist (at least so far). There’s always a chance this is part of the larger mystery and will be explained down the road, but right now I can’t get a grasp on it. Unless it turns out everyone is in the cult, this might end up feeling a tad disappointing.

That’s not to say I’m not into the podcast. I am! I think it’s a lot of fun, even if it’s got issues. In the end, I think the best indicator for a narrative podcast—really, any kind of story—is how much you care about finding out what’s going to happen next. And right now, I’m really interested in what’s down the road for Wolverine: The Long Night. It might not be perfect, and some of the characters and setups might verge on the ridiculous, but it’s exciting to experience a comic book universe story in this format. I don’t know how successful it’s going to be, or whether it will actually launch a Marvel Podcast Universe, but I admire them for trying—and I’m very glad they did it.


https://io9.gizmodo.com/wolverine-the-long-night-is-the-x-men-crime-drama-podc-1823594596?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_twitter&utm_source=io9_twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

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Ein Interview mit Scott Adsit, der Sheriff Ridge im Podcast gibt. Richard ist ab 0:40 zu sehen:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jD2yoXqmjqY&feature=youtu.be

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Kurz und schmerzlos:

Zitat:
Podcast of the week: Marvel launch immersive Wolverine crime thriller The Long Night logan marvel 2017’s

Alex Nelson Alex Nelson
Wednesday March 21st 2018

As the superhero genre continues to evolve – from schlocky, over-the-top fantasy to more thoughtful, action-centered thrillers – Marvel makes the move into podcasts. This series follows the hunt for a killer whose methods of dispatching his victims – he leaves them sliced and dismembered – seem to point towards Wolverine, the X-Man portrayed by Hugh Jackman on the big screen. Here, he’s voiced by Richard Armitage, complete with all the Marvel continuity you’d expect. Wolverine: The Long Night plays out like a moody, atmospheric detective thriller. Exceptional sound-design will have fans of crime-thrillers hooked – the fact that it’s a Marvel tie-in is moot.


https://inews.co.uk/culture/radio/the-long-night-podcast-wolverine/

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BeitragVerfasst: 25.03.2018, 12:24 
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Podcast: Wolverine: The Long Night is a well-crafted thriller
A new series starring Marvel’s supernatural character refines the fiction podcast genre


It was only a matter of time before the big beasts of entertainment tackled audio fiction. As well as now having the potential to reach millions, podcast dramas are comparatively cheap to make, relying on intimacy and imagination rather than baroque set pieces.

Welcome, then, Wolverine: The Long Night, a 10-part fictional drama made by Marvel in partnership with the podcast platform Stitcher. Directed by Brendan Baker and written by the novelist and comics author Ben Percy, it tells of strange goings-on in the fictional town of Burns, Alaska. A local crab fisherman has discovered an abandoned trawler, its crew lying dead in the cargo hold. Inspection of the bodies reveals large slash marks across their faces and torsos. Special agents Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) and Tad Marshall (Ato Essandoh) are dispatched to investigate and, in doing so, hear about two more deaths in the local town. Both bodies were found with similar claw-like wounds, assumed by police to be the work of a grizzly bear, though the victims’ families aren’t convinced.

As the title suggests, Marvel’s best-known mutant, Wolverine (played by The Hobbit’s Richard Armitage), also known as Logan, is involved but, three episodes in, it’s unclear exactly how. Last seen hiding out in a cabin several miles out of town and intermittently working on fishing trawlers, Logan is trying to lie low, but where he goes, calamity follows. Elsewhere there are whispers of a secretive cult that proselytises via a rogue radio signal, and a wealthy local family that quietly runs the town. With hints of Twin Peaks, True Detective and S-Town, the mood here is dark and uneasy. “Everybody wants their privacy because everyone’s got something to hide,” says the young deputy assigned by the police to chaperone agents Pierce and Marshall during their investigations.

There are clear challenges in making this often visual genre function as audio, which is perhaps why Wolverine has the feel of a well-crafted thriller rather than a smash-bang-pow superhero yarn. It’s to Percy’s credit that he keeps Logan at arm’s length; while he is central to the narrative, his story is told second-hand and via flashbacks. As well as injecting some mystery, this also has the benefit of giving the supporting characters room to develop.

Anyone hoping that Marvel’s first audio outing would instantly revolutionise the medium may be disappointed since, in giving us a tale of small-town murder, we are in familiar podcasting territory. But there are small touches that go a long way in refining the fiction genre, the most effective being Wolverine’s use of outdoor locations complete with the sound of wind, birdsong and crunching leaves. There’s no sense of actors huddled around a studio microphone, which is a rarity in audio fiction. Who would have imagined that a story about a clawed comic-book character with supernatural abilities would offer a masterclass in dramatic realism?


https://www.ft.com/content/5532658a-2dee-11e8-97ec-4bd3494d5f14

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BeitragVerfasst: 03.04.2018, 22:05 
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ENTERTAINMENT-TONIGHT

ET Obsessions: The Weeknd’s New Album, Sandra Oh on ‘Killing Eve’ and More!


Author: ETonline Staff, ET Online
Published: 1:21 PM EDT April 3, 2018

Why We’re Obsessed With The Weeknd’s ‘My Dear Melancholy,’

After returning to the Billboard charts earlier this year with “Pray for Me,” a song from the Black Panther soundtrack, The Weeknd made some lemonadeof his own, dropping a surprise EP full of hints about a relationship gone sour. My Dear Melancholy, is only six tracks, but packs plenty of angst amid its sharp beats and the singer’s signature falsetto, leading many fans to speculate that several of the tracks were written about the soulful singer’s ill-fated 2017 relationship with Selena Gomez. The opening song, “Call Out My Name,” bemoans a romance that left The Weeknd feeling like “just another pit stop,” while the Skrillex-produced “Wasted Times” laments that the new love “wasn’t half of you” in not-so-subtle, NSFW shout-outs to an “equestrian” ex, which very possibly refers to horse lover Bella Hadid. Whether you’re in it for the drama, or just the jams, The Weeknd’s new offering hearkens back to his stellar breakthrough album, Beauty Behind the Madness, with all the swooning synths and lovesick lyrics that sent him triple-platinum in the first place.

My Dear Melancholy, is now streaming.

Why We’re Obsessed With Wolverine

While Hugh Jackman may have retracted his claws for the final time in Logan, the superhero has leapt off the page again this year in Marvel’s first-ever scripted podcast series, Wolverine: The Long Night. The show’s synopsis reads: "Following a string of mysterious deaths in Burns, Alaska, Special Agents Sally Pierce and Tad Marshall arrive to investigate. They soon find there’s more going on than meets the eye.” Richard Armitage (a reliable voice performer) portrays the titular character in this original tale that feels like it could easily be retro-adapted into a comic book run. Full of intrigue and suspense, sound designers have done an amazing job transporting listeners into the story by providing each scene with its own ambiance and texture. A joint production between Marvel and Stitcher, The Long Night is destined to become their first of many audio dramas in the near future.

Wolverine: The Long Night is now available via Stitcher Premium.

Why We’re Obsessed With Killing Eve

Sandra Oh is back on TV with BBC America’s new thriller, Killing Eve, which sees the actress playing Eve, an MI5 security officer stuck behind a desk opposite Jodie Comer, who plays Villanelle, a talented killer obsessed with luxury. The two spar in a game of cat and mouse after a Russian politician is murdered, setting them on a violent collision course. Fans of the Grey’s Anatomy star may be surprised to see Oh in such a different role from Dr. Christina Yang, but the actress showcased her a**-kicking chops with 2017’s Catfight. However, this show is more than two women fighting, thanks to Fleabag’s Phoebe Waller-Bridge, who developed and wrote the series and adds a bit of twisted humor to the show.

Killing Eve airs Sundays at 8 p.m. ET on BBC America.

Why We’re Obsessed With Love After Love


What happens when you lose the foundation of your family? Russell Harbaugh’s new film about the loss of a patriarch explores that idea through the surviving family members and how they come to terms with it. Andie MacDowell leads the cast as Suzanne, a mother attempting to explore a new relationship following her husband’s death. This, of course, is at odds with her oldest son, Nicholas (Chris O’Dowd), whose own relationship with his girlfriend is falling apart and doesn’t think his mother should move on. Meanwhile, the youngest son, Chris (James Adomian), deals with grief in his own complicated way. First premiering at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival, Love After Love was one of the standouts, particularly thanks to MacDowell, who seems to be enjoying a resurgence following her welcome appearance in Magic Mike XXL.

Love After Love is now available on demand.

-- Additional writing by Joe Bergren, Meredith Kile and Stacy Lambe


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