Aktuelle Zeit: 09.07.2020, 20:08

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Forumsregeln


Die Forumsregeln lesen



Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 28 Beiträge ]  Gehe zu Seite 1, 2  Nächste
Autor Nachricht
 Betreff des Beitrags: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 08.09.2019, 14:31 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Die ersten Berichte und Tweets deuten darauf hin, dass 'My Zoe' gut ankommt: :daumen:

Zitat:
Jubel für Julie Delpy am 44. TIFF

Julie Delpys Drama "My Zoe" hat beim 44. Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) Weltpremiere gefeiert. Die deutsche Koproduktion mit Daniel Brühl in der Rolle eines Kinderwunsch-Arztes wurde vom kanadischen Publikum am Samstag (Ortszeit) begeistert aufgenommen.
Toroonto.

Zunächst startet der Beitrag als ein Scheidungsdrama zwischen Isabelle (Delpy) und James (Richard Armitage), die um Zeit und Aufmerksamkeit ihre Tochter Zoe (Sophia Ally) kämpfen. Dann geht der Film nach einer schrecklichen Tragödie in einen futuristischen Thriller über.

Isabelles Liebe zu ihrem Kind kennt keine Grenzen, was die Wissenschaftlerin zu einem berüchtigten Arzt (Brühl) und dessen Frau (Gemma Arterton) nach Moskau führt. "Isabelles Verweigerung, die Realität zu akzeptieren, lässt sie radikale Dinge tun", sagte die französische Schauspielerin, die bei "My Zoe" auch Regie geführt hat, nach der Premiere.
Viele Stars

"Die Idee zu dieser Geschichte über Trauer, Schmerz und Verlust entstand vor gut 25 Jahren und liess mich nie ganz los," sagte Delpy. Seitdem habe sich viel getan in Technologie und Wissenschaft, was Isabelles Vorgehen noch beängstigender mache. "Denn so ganz lässt einen der Gedanke nicht los, dass das, was Isabelle und der Doktor tun, tatsächlich bald möglich sein könnte."

Beim TIFF werden bis zum 15. September 333 Filme aus 84 Ländern gezeigt. Beim diesjährigen Festival warten über 133 Weltpremieren auf das Publikum, das in Toronto anstatt einer Jury die Gewinner wählt. Angekündigt haben sich unter anderem Hollywood-Grössen wie Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Nicole Kidman, Kristen Stewart, Russell Crowe und Jamie Foxx.


https://www.vaterland.li/vermischtes/lifestyle/lifestyle/jubel-fuer-julie-delpy-am-44-tiff;art604,398104


Zitat:
Jutta Brendemuhl@JuttaBrendemuhl

#TIFF19
#MyZoe: Writer-director-actor #JulieDelpy throws a barrage of ethical fire bombs at the audience. I do not remember a film throwing me this much for a loop, will have to mull over (⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️) review for a bit. Brilliant portrayal of pain & loss from Delpy & @RCArmitage
.


Bild

https://twitter.com/JuttaBrendemuhl/status/1170443756451110914


Zitat:
Jason Carlos@jaarlos

Queen-writer-director-actor Julie Delpy’s MY ZOE is a genre-defying film about grief and morality that will keep me up for a long time: stunning, tragic, and haunting. #TIFF19


https://twitter.com/jaarlos/status/1170441906167455748

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags:
Verfasst: 08.09.2019, 14:31 


Nach oben
  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 08.09.2019, 14:37 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Und da ist auch schon die Kritik von Jutta Brendemühl - für's Goethe-Institut (da sieh mal an):

Zitat:
#TIFF19 #review: My Zoe
(Spoiler alert)

Spoiler: anzeigen
A film couldn’t have a happier opening image than a pregnant woman sitting on a bench, protectively stroking her belly. We’ll circle back to what happiness is in the last scene, but especially at the beginning of MY ZOE, cameraman Stéphane Fontaine’s (JACKIE; ELLE) pleasantly restrained cinematography doesn’t let us rest there, quickly hinting at the fact that bliss is fleeting, fragile, ephemeral. In blurry images and through unobtrusive tableaus of a family breakfast table, a child’s bed-time, the normal, comfortable routine of middle-aged French-American Isabelle is established. We see her take her bright, multilingual 7-year-old daughter Zoe to school in the heart of Berlin; we follow Isabelle on her way to her work as a medical researcher, negotiating custody arrangements with her estranged British husband James over the phone. Stress, fun, responsibility, juggling soccer practice and zoo visits, the usual elements of modern patchwork family life.

Oscar-nominated writer-director-actor Julie Delpy (BEFORE SUNSET) gives a no holds barred performance of this mother, full of effusive love and the accompanying self-doubt and anxiety, whose world is rocked when something happens to “her Zoe." In the Q&A at the TIFF19 world premiere, Delpy explained that the film was decades in the making and took its beginning with a conversation with her then-director Krzysztof Kieślowski on fate, family and loss.

Richard Armitage (still somewhat on home turf in Berlin through BERLIN STATION) is Isabelle’s ex-husband, seemingly hard, angry, unforgiving, even spiteful.
The couple give new meaning to “irreconcilable differences,” bickering, hissing suspicions and accusations. Just when you decide to dislike James and take sides in the war of roses, Armitage lets us in on another part of James, hints at another side of the couple’s discordant history, adding tender vulnerability, deep hurt, and an understandable longing for his lost family. By letting their former love shine through, the tension between the two adults becomes plausible and all the more mournful. It is rare in a film to be able to relate to all characters in their full human complexity —vanity, jealousy, egotism, and all— , but Delpy’s focussed writing and direction and the cast's nuanced skills make it so. Armitage was at TIFF16 in a similar role with BRAIN ON FIRE, but outdoes himself here, gradually deteriorating and disintegrating alongside Isabelle’s intense desperation and determination.

The challenges of parenting loom large at TIFF and other festivals this year (perhaps a sign of a global cohort of established middle-aged filmmakers), from Cannes thriller PARASITE to sci-fi drama PROXIMA --with a similar set-up of estranged scientist co-parents of a young daughter struggling with tough decisions-- to Angela Schanelec’s relentless I WAS AT HOME BUT, Katrin Gebbe’s adoption drama PELICAN BLOOD (both at TIFF) and Germany’s Berlinale-winning Oscar entry SYSTEM CRASHER. TIFF rightly put MY ZOE into its exciting Platform section of strong and boundary-pushing directorial voices.

Delpy’s seventh film, and unlike all her others I’ve seen, stands out in going well beyond the same old dysfunctional family plot and seeing its moral and ethical conundrums through to the bitter-sweet end. When every parent’s nightmare happens, Isabelle and James have no family left to share the pain, no relationship left to comfort each other or conjure up much compassion outside of their own respective grief. Brief moments of attempted rapprochement falter, dragged down by the maelstrom of tragedy. Why is there no word for a parent who lost their child, wonders Isabelle. Her own mother is the opposite of helpful, so both parents are left alone, together. No melodrama, no music. Delpy simply shows and we follow her. It is that personal lens that makes the story so gut-wrenching and compelling. One could argue that the film is more about the first than the second word in the title (and I think Delpy knows that), but again, Fontaine's camera helps to gently steer us away from any myopia, flitting onto the faces of other people, suffering or anxious for loved ones, in the hospital's hallway. Pain and death are common, human. What is uncommon is Isabelle’s radical rejection to accept that fate. She is so far gone in her pain that anything becomes thinkable, any boundary transgressible. Greek myths from Orpheus to Baucis and Philemon come to mind. “What kind of life will she have?” asks the doctor who cares for Zoe at the end. The question applies to Isabelle and James as well.

Then the first twist (to put it mildly) confirms that we are in a near-future where Isabelle will make her own fate. Some advanced tech gadgets were giving us pointers before; but that doesn’t matter, what counts is that we are always in Isabelle’s present. Daniel Bruehl and Gemma Arterton come into play as a geneticist and his wife, who lead us to yet another twist — that one a bit harder to follow, but follow we will throughout three acts that could be three entire films.

Guilt, blame, emotional damage, eternal hope, the basic questions of the right to life, death, individuality, fatherhood, motherhood, nature and nurture are all woven into the dense script but do not weigh the film down. What could have been a didactic quagmire or morality play is instead a beautifully lucid, strangely conclusive, utterly non-judgmental exploration of parenthood, family-making, and choosing happiness that leaves you stunned and pensive.

Delpy puts her story in front of you and leaves it there. I thought I had an informed (and tested) standpoint on many of these questions, but the ending (not the outcome) left me shaken.


(German trailer)

by Jutta Brendemühl


https://blog.goethe.de/arthousefilm/archives/773-TIFF19-review-My-Zoe.html

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 08.09.2019, 23:38 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Drei gute (zweimal B) Reviews:

Zitat:
‘My Zoe’ Review: Julie Delpy Tackles a Tricky, Twisted Thriller Masquerading as a Domestic Drama
TIFF: For her seventh feature, the filmmaker and actress unspools a divorce drama, a medical mystery, and a contemporary morality play all in one ambitious package.


Kate Erbland


Neatly and purposely divided into three acts — a black screen signals the lag time between each, should the viewer not be ready for the required understanding that things are about to change, and that it’s best to prepare now — Julie Delpy’s fascinating “My Zoe” uses its classic formal structure to tell a thoroughly modern tale. While Delpy’s directorial output thus far has mostly consisted of fizzy rom-coms like her “Two Days” features and the odd historical drama (“The Countess”), “My Zoe” finds the filmmaker and star moving fast into fresh territory. One part domestic drama, one part medical mystery, “My Zoe” subtly spins those two acts into its final segment: a contemporary thriller with morals and medicine on its mind.

First, though, there’s Delpy’s Isabelle and the eponymous Zoe, her apple-cheeked daughter (Sophia Ally, putting on a remarkably unfussy performance for a screen newbie and a kid to boot). Isabelle and Zoe’s dad, James (Richard Armitage), are in the final throes of their divorce, with Zoe’s custody arrangement the last box to check off. Despite telling the film firmly from Isabelle’s vantage point (there’s little question that the “my” in its title is entirely for her, not James), Delpy the writer and director doesn’t take sides, while Delpy the actress is firmly dedicated to getting Isabelle what she’s owed, by any means necessary.

What Isabelle is owed — or, what she thinks she’s owed — is simple: Zoe. Unhappy with James’ approach to parenting and righteously angry about a custody agreement that doesn’t give her much wiggle room (Isabelle, a doctor who moved to Berlin to accommodate her then-husband’s career, is occasionally called away for work travel; James doesn’t want to “reimburse” her for any time she might miss with Zoe, should she be out of town during her assigned custody days). They both have a point, but they’ve been circling over them for so long, neither has an inch left of give left in them.

Eventually, Delpy’s smart script reveals the source of their marital discord, a revelation that seems to tip the scales more firmly in the favor of one half of the ex-couple. Then, of course, she twists back on it, again digging into thorny moral arguments that don’t really give anyone that much high ground. What’s clear, however, is that both Isabelle and James love Zoe.

It’s perhaps unfortunate that formal descriptions of the film’s plot must be divulged to move forward into its winding narrative (in the TIFF program guide, a life-changing “tragedy” is obliquely mentioned), but knowing that Delpy is driving toward something shocking does allow the audience to appreciate the tension that begins to permeate the film’s first act. Delpy pulls the string ever tighter, and she’s laid out enough hints in just the film’s first twenty minutes that the inevitable act could be one of many.

What happens — and that won’t be spoiled here — pushes the film into a second act that functions as a medical drama, complete with mysteries to uncover and enough expository shouting to keep James and Isabelle hating each other for decades to come (and more than enough for audiences to chew on for the rest of the film). As Delpy pushes “My Zoe” further and further away from her usual directorial conventions and expectations, she allows the space for audiences to believe (or at least engage with) the nutty jump that marks it third act.

While the film is never given a precise period in history, there are hints throughout that it takes place a few years into the future, with Isabelle often turning to a slightly advanced technology for ordinary use. (Her cell phone is a bit too slick, her laptop screen is no everyday MacBook.) Those prop choices are one of many subtle touches Delpy layers on, unfussy and trusting of her audience to pay attention to the hints she’s dropping.

Which is not to say that the ultimate twist of the third act is as cleverly telegraphed, with Isabelle turning to a medical acquaintance (her frequent co-star Daniel Bruhl) and his practical wife (Gemma Arterton, underused) for assistance with an idea that could right the tragedy that just marred the second act. While Isabelle’s motivations make sense, Bruhl’s doctor is much more muddled, and the film’s big shock requires him to make a choice that, mere seconds earlier in the film, he was not even remotely prepared to make.

Yet Delpy’s ability to believe in both her audience and her wild story remains compelling throughout the film, even as it careens through tropes and tricks and genres with increasingly off-kilter speed. It may not stick the landing, but by the time the screen goes black one final time, Delpy has left enough to think about for another three acts.

Grade: B


https://www.indiewire.com/2019/09/my-zoe-review-julie-delpy-thriller-tiff-1202171927/

ACHTUNG SPOILER!

Zitat:
‘My Zoe’: An Exciting New Direction For Writer/Director/Star Julie Delpy [TIFF Review]

Matthew Monagle
September 8, 2019 2:19 pm


It’s no coincidence that so many of the best horror movies—“The Exorcist,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “The Babadook”—focus on parents because there is nothing more terrifying than being one. An early scene in Julie Delpy’s “My Zoe” captures that constant, low-key fear as vividly as I’ve ever seen. Isabelle (Delpy), a divorced mother, is working; her daughter Zoe (Sophia Ally) is spending the day with her father, James (Richard Armitage). Isabelle has sent a couple of texts, asking how things are going, but James has not responded. She tries calling – no answer. And immediately, without skipping a beat, she goes to Google to see if there have been any accidents at the park where they were spending the day. In that sequence of events, Delpy is capturing two of the key emotions of having children: 1.) The sheer panic of just not knowing what’s happening, where your child is and what they’re doing, and 2.) Immediately imagining the absolute worst-case scenario.

“My Zoe” is also a movie about living through the absolute worst-case scenario. Its early passages don’t seem too far removed from Delpy’s earlier directorial efforts, like “2 Days in Paris” and “2 Days in New York”; it’s a dialogue-heavy, relationship-centered story, just more drama than comedy/drama. Isabelle and James’s separation is fresh, and they’re still navigating some very choppy waters, unable to work out simple joint-custody schedules issues without mediation and turning every conversation into a conflict. The exhausting emotional turmoil of those interactions, however, seem like a necessity for Isabelle, who will withstand them to get as much time as possible with her young daughter. “It’s like I’m missing half her life,” she says.

And then, one morning, Zoe doesn’t wake up. She seemed a little sick the night before, but she didn’t have a temperature, and Isabelle figured they’d ride it out; now she finds herself in the back of an ambulance, pleading with the EMTs to tell her what’s going on. (This entire sequence is about as upsetting as anything I’ve seen in a recent movie.) Initially, they can’t tell her; she and James sit in the hospital, just waiting, powerless, helpless. They’re told it was an aneurysm. They’re told, “There’s very little brain activity at this point.” They’re told she will live – “the question is, what kind of life?”

You might assume Delpy is going to take the obvious road, and craft a heart-wrenching drama about the end of life, the right to die, and who gets to make those choices. And you would be wrong. Instead, she wonders what would happen if Isabelle—a scientist by trade—became driven, obsessed even, by the idea of “fixing” this horrible tragedy. And if you’re willing to follow her down that path, the film’s unexpected shift into something like science fiction doesn’t seem like a stretch at all.

Delpy’s thoughtful screenplay is somewhat theatrical not in its style, but in its approach – she’s dealing with big ideas here, dramatized in dialogue by approachable characters. She’s got a particular gift for naturally incorporating backstory; we learn all the details of the divorce in an argument during this moment of stress, an exposition dump smartly packaged as each party reiterating their revisionist history. (She can also over-talk the plot points, and the second half of the script could’ve frankly used some tightening.)

She remains an actor-first filmmaker, so her camera is sometimes stylized yet never obtrusive. But she’s a master of mood. Observe her evocative use of sound and unexpected cutaways, or how she uses the warmth of Isabelle’s memory to contrast the sterility of the hospital, creating one of the film’s most potent images: of this mother walking down the street, hand extended for a child that will, it seems, never run up to grasp it again. There are moments in “My Zoe” that are hard to watch, unthinkable in their emotional brutality. That Delpy finds her way to the ending she does—and earns it is—no small accomplishment. [B]


https://theplaylist.net/my-zoe-review-20190908/


Zitat:
Dispatch: Early Hits, Misses and Mehs at Toronto Film Festival

By Lisa Trifone on September 7, 2019

In just its first few days, the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival has presented dozens of films to thousands of eager audiences. Some (the movies, that is) have arrived to acclaim and appreciation; others, less so. As just one person, I’ve not been able to see them all since landing in Canada, but I think I’ve made a decent dent, tallying up nine films in just over two days.

Below are a few quick takes on what I’ve been able to catch; watch for full reviews when these films open in theaters in Chicago and you can head out to see them, too. In the meantime, allow me to whet your cinematic appetite.


Waves

The third feature film from Trey Edward Shults (Krisha, It Comes at Night), Waves quickly became a hot ticket in the first days of the festival, so much so that they added an extra screening just so more people could see it. The film is a whirling, spinning roller coaster of emotion and drama, often literally. Shults and cinematographer Drew Daniels make liberal use of cameras wheeling this way and that to give us a sense of the chaotic, pressure-cooker world inhabited by protagonist Tyler Williams (Kelvin Harrison Jr), a star wrestler with a promising future. All that comes tumbling down after a series of bad decisions and bursts (waves?) of emotion, and soon Shults has shifted his gaze to Tyler’s sister Emily (Taylor Russell) and her new boyfriend, Luke (Lucas Hedges), as they fall in love and try to move on from all her family has been through. With several moving pieces to manage (their parents, played by Sterling K. Brown and Renee Elise Goldsberry, have their own devastating arc, too), the film never feels overly complicated. And with an ever-growing confidence at the helm, Shults creates a gorgeously inventive film that plays with transitions and aspect ratios and relishes in its exceptional score. (A24 will release Waves in theaters on November 1.)


Blackbird

An English-language remake of 2014’s Silent Heart, Roger Michell (My Cousin Rachel) creates a moving family drama about a matriarch (Susan Sarandon as Lily) with a terminal illness who, with husband Paul (Sam Neill), gathers her family for one final gathering at their secluded seaside home. Grown daughters Jennifer (Kate Winslet) and Anna (Mia Wasikowska), their partners Michael (Rainn Wilson) and Chris (Bex Taylor-Klaus), their grandson Jonathan (Anson Boon) and best friend Liz (Lindsay Duncan) come together to honor her wishes, but soon family tensions and secrets bubble up in ways Lily couldn’t have anticipated. With a stacked cast, the film mostly works as a reminder that any family, no matter how picture-perfect, has their issues, even if a few moments don’t ring true in the midst of the larger narrative. (Blackbird does not have a theatrical release date yet.)


My Zoe

Is the world ready for Julie Delpy, sci-fi filmmaker? We shall see, as the French filmmaker’s latest delves squarely into the space of the eerily unbelievable, with a healthy dose of psychological thriller added for good measure. In addition to writing and directing, Delpy also stars in My Zoe as Isabelle, a hard-working immunologist in the throes of a contentious custody battle with ex James (Richard Armitage) over their young daughter, Zoe. Set in Berlin in what appears to be present day, Isabelle and James keep up appearances in front of the adorable Zoe, all positivity and innocence; but really, each stakes their claim on their daughter’s time as they navigate their new reality as single parents. Everything changes when tragedy strikes this broken family; it’s a cryptic description, to be sure, but necessary in order to preserve the narrative left-turns Delpy has embedded in this original and intriguing film. Also starring Daniel Brühl and Gemma Arterton, Delpy is clearly delving deep into her own questions about life, love, loss, parenthood and yes, even science. (My Zoe does not have a theatrical release date yet.)


The Personal History of David Copperfield

Filmmaker Armando Iannucci is best known for his gut-busting (and very vulgar) humor in the likes of In the Loop, “Veep” and last year’s underrated The Death of Stalin. In The Personal History of David Copperfield, a wonderfully whimsical adaptation of the Charles Dickens novel he wrote and directed, Iannucci appears to have tamed his talent for visciously creative, profanity-ridden insults, crafting instead a story of a young man with one very interesting existence. On its surface, there’s no real reason for this film to exist; who is David Copperfield (Dev Patel), and why should we care? There is no quest here, no mission or end goal. We’re simply along for the ride, as young David is banished from home when his mother remarries; when he’s sent to boarding school when his relations in London (including Peter Capaldi) can’t continue to host him; when he loses it all and moves in with his dear aunt (Tilda Swinton) and her slightly crazy lodger (Hugh Laurie); when he lands a job as a proctor, whatever that is. And yet, it’s all recounted with such vivacity and enthusiasm, one can’t quite help but be swept along for the ride. (Fox Searchlight will release The Personal History of David Copperfield in theaters in the fall.)


Hope Gap

Annette Bening is having a bit of a comeback. Or was she ever gone? Either way, her recent turns in the likes of 20th Century Women, Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool and the like are strong reminders of what a living legend she is. Such is the case with Hope Gap, a flawed but well-intentioned drama about the dissolution of a marriage. Bening is Grace, married nearly 30 years to Edward (Bill Nighy) with one grown son, Jamie (Josh O’Connor, God’s Own Country), and it’s clear from the start that the spouses are at a divide, unable to communicate and not all that interested in the other. When Edward breaks the news that he’s leaving, writer/director William Nicholson (who based the film on his own experience with his parents’ separation when he was in his late 20s) does something most filmmakers avoid: he stays in the moment. Rather than move on from the actual break and show us what happens next for each of them, Nicholson sets us up in their family kitchen to watch the pieces of this life get dismantled one by one, from the timing of the conversation to the awkward insistence that Jamie play middleman between his parents. Hope Gap is far from a perfect film (sequences with Jamie and his friends back in London fall horribly flat), but gets an A for effort in my book. (Screen Media Films will release Hope Gap in the US in the coming months.)


Pain and Glory

Though it originally premiered at Cannes back in May and has been released theatrically in Spain and elsewhere, Pedro Almodóvar’s Pain and Glory arrives in North America to take your breath away. Part memoir, part masterpiece, Antonio Banderas delivers the best work of his career—measured, vulnerable, resonant—as Salvador, a stand in for the filmmaker, exploring his relationship with his mother (played in flashbacks by Penelope Cruz), his first true love, and his long career in filmmaking. When a local cinematheque asks him to screen the fictional Sabor, that first film, as part of a retrospective, a whole host of memories and emotions are stirred up, including his strained relationship with the film’s star. As the two reunite in a cautious if familiar friendship, Salvador navigates his chronic pain and health issues, a budding drug addiction and his own unresolved memories of his mother and his childhood in poverty. Nostalgia can all too easily warp into self-indulgence; in Almodóvar’s more than capable hands, it is simply sublime. (Sony Pictures Classics will release Pain and Glory in theaters on October 4.)


Radioactive

A couple of years ago, I spent a long week in Paris, exploring more of the city than I ever had before; I even wandered through the Panthéon, a massive structure in the city’s Latin Quarter. Once a church, it’s now a massive mausoleum, where France’s most notable citizens are interred, including the famous scientist Marie Curie, and her husband, Pierre. On the day I visited, notes and flowers adorned her tomb, notes of thanks from girls studying science, notes of wonder and awe at all she’d accomplished. Though it will cost more than a movie ticket, that trip may be a better tribute to Madame Curie and her work than Radioactive, a narrative so oversimplified it’s nearly offensive. Written by Jack Thorne from a graphic novel (!) by Lauren Redniss, Marjane Satrapi directs Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl) in this polished period piece that doesn’t trust its audience enough to know the Curies’ legacy even today, that their discovery of radium and polonium would have lasting (and quite detrimental) effects on generations. Pike succeeds (as always), and the early descriptions of the Curies’ work is intriguing, but the film overall is a ghastly consolidation of the life of a woman who deserves much more. (Amazon Studios will open Radioactive in 2020.)


Seberg

Having matured as an actor quite significantly since her Twilight days, Kristen Stewart is enjoying a prime moment in her career, with projects like Personal Shopper serving as vehicles for her considerable talent. She does similarly well in Seberg as the film’s title character, Jean Seberg, the American actress who, by the late 1960s was being targeted by the FBI for her involvement with civil rights causes and activist groups like the Black Panthers. Unfortunately, the film cannot live up to Stewart’s standards, as it meanders through far too many plotlines, never quite capable of deciding which one it’s most interested in. Is this the story of Jean Seberg, the actress haunted by her traumatic experiences on set with Otto Preminger and searching for love and meaning wherever she can find it? Is it the story of a single-minded, wrong-headed government intelligence organization that goes to great (and illegal) lengths to prove its case? Is it the story of a movement that would forever reshape the fabric of the country through protest, legislation and violence? Yes. Or something. (Amazon Studios will open Seberg in theaters in the coming months.)


https://thirdcoastreview.com/2019/09/07/film-dispatch-toronto-2019-1/

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 09.09.2019, 00:36 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Noch eine ausführliche Review mit noch mehr Spoilern. Es ist ja nicht so einfach eine spoilerfreie Kritik zu schreiben, aber hier wird zum Teil so genau erzählt, was wann wie passiert, dass es eindeutig zu viel des Guten ist:

Zitat:
'My Zoe': Film Review | TIFF 2019

12:37 PM PDT 9/8/2019 by Jon Frosch

A well-crafted but familiar-feeling downer. TWITTER
Julie Delpy writes, directs and stars in a sci-fi-inflected drama about a woman who goes to extremes when tragedy strikes her family.

After earning some Stateside directorial clout for her warm, ticklishly funny 2007 culture-clash rom-com 2 Days in Paris (and, to a lesser extent, its sequel 2 Days in New York), Julie Delpy veers into much chillier territory with her new film, My Zoe.

She comes bearing an attention-grabber of a premise: A scientist in the near future loses her beloved grade-school-age daughter to a brain injury, and then tries to have her cloned. Contrary to what one might expect, though, Delpy doesn’t milk the story for sci-fi creepiness or dystopian thrills; rather, she aims for emotional realism — something that, thanks to her intense lead performance and sleek yet subdued direction, she mostly achieves.

But without the distance and diversion that a more genre-driven approach might have afforded, My Zoe becomes an unremitting downer, and a fairly familiar-feeling one. Despite the provocative questions it poses — often too deliberately — about science and ethics, the movie is, at heart, a portrait of a harrowing medical crisis and subsequent maternal grief. In other words, with its scenes of doctors delivering dire news and parents keeping bedside vigil, then grappling with devastating loss, most of My Zoe is nothing particularly new.

What interests Delpy, and so many filmmakers before her, is the terrifying vulnerability inherent in a mother’s attachment to her child; if you love someone so deeply, so purely, wouldn’t that person’s death be impossible to endure? My Zoe literalizes this dilemma by presenting a protagonist who indeed refuses to endure it. But while the film is effective on its own narrow terms, it lacks the spark of urgency, suppleness of tone and freshness of insight that would make it truly compelling. Viewers may emerge admiring Delpy’s sincerity and commitment; they may also miss her flair for neurotic, mid-career-Woody-Allen-esque comedy.

The writer-director plays Isabelle, a French-American geneticist in Berlin who shares custody of her daughter, Zoe (Sophia Ally), with British ex-husband James (Richard Armitage of the Hobbit movies, looking like a leaner, meaner Hugh Jackman). You immediately sense what an adoring, attentive mom Isabelle is from an early glimpse of her watching Zoe eat breakfast. ("I haven’t finished my pomegranate!" the kid exclaims when Isabelle ushers her out the door, a first-world-problems line if ever there was one.)

Isabelle has a handsome new beau, Akil (Saleh Bakri), but can usually be found bickering with James. The scenes in which the two butt heads are written and performed with a kind of bitter verve, nailing the way exes with a lot of history sometimes engage — the hostility simmering just beneath a surface of weary cordiality. That said, the fights between Isabelle and James take up a disproportionate chunk of the film’s 90-minute running time; no matter the genre she’s working in, the charged interplay between lovers, or former lovers, seems to be Delpy’s comfort zone.

Maintaining a mood of cool detachment while gently ratcheting up the tension, the filmmaker lets you know something tragic this way comes (Zoe’s suspiciously frequent sneezing is a red flag, as is Isabelle’s palpable nervousness every time her daughter is out of her sight). After complaining of a headache one day, Zoe goes to sleep — and then doesn’t wake up. She’s rushed to the hospital, where doctors diagnose a brain hemorrhage and perform emergency surgery.

Seated in the waiting room, Isabelle and James go at it once again, scratching open the scabs of their marriage in a series of exchanges that make the spats in Noah Baumbach’s searing Marriage Story look like banter. Between their ill-timed sniping and the steady stream of medical staff bearing bad news, you’d be forgiven for eyeing the exits. This section of the movie is at once unpleasant and admirably uncompromising, which is basically My Zoe in a nutshell. There’s no Von Trier-ish or Haneke-ian sadism in Delpy’s storytelling or sensibility, but there’s a relentlessness, a singlemindedness that can be exhausting.

When Zoe doesn’t wake up and doctors start broaching the topic of organ donation, Isabelle slips into her room and takes a tissue sample. Then it’s off to Moscow to try to convince a controversial fertility doctor named Thomas (a fine Daniel Bruhl) to clone Zoe’s cells and transfer the resulting embryo into Isabelle.

Even as the film takes this drastic turn, it stubbornly sticks to a register of downbeat drama, never varying its rhythms or the scope of its imagery (a few shots of cheerfully pregnant elderly women at Thomas’ clinic are as weird as things get). HBO’s recent miniseries Years and Years used brisk pacing and generous helpings of humor to make the transition into a nightmarish future feel eerily normal, and to carry viewers along — to soften the blow of all the bleakness. My Zoe, by contrast, deprives us of anything that could air the film out a bit, or offer a buffer from Isabelle’s misery.

That misery stacks the deck in favor of the protagonist, both in her efforts to recruit Thomas and in the film’s larger moral vision. Thomas may be armed with arguments against doing what Isabelle asks him to do — both express their views in bursts of clunkily didactic dialogue — but Isabelle has real, human pain; even Thomas' wife (Gemma Arterton), initially repulsed by Isabelle’s request, starts to sympathize with her.

If you understand why, it’s thanks to Delpy, as usual a luminous, electrically intelligent screen presence. Resisting what might have been the more intuitive, and cinematic, choice of playing Isabelle for madness, she makes the character’s radical decisions feel like the (almost, mostly, sort of) logical result of a mother’s love.

Technically the film is smooth, with fluid camerawork, tight editing and a sharp attention to detail (in one scene, a conversation between a shell-shocked Isabelle and Akil is punctuated by the screech of the Berlin metro outside, providing piercing notes of horror). Meanwhile, the complete lack of music — no score, no soundtrack — is emblematic of this dour movie’s refusal to pander, or to entertain.

Venue: Toronto International Film Festival (Platform)
Production companies: Amusement Park Film, Warner Bros. Film Productions Germany, Electrick Films, Tempete Sous Un Crane, UGC
Writer-director: Julie Delpy
Cast: Julie Delpy, Richard Armitage, Daniel Bruhl, Gemma Arterton, Saleh Bakri, Lindsay Duncan, Sophia Ally
Producers: Malte Grunert, Gabrielle Tana, Andrew Levitas, Julie Delpy, Hubert Caillard, Dominique Boutonnat
Executive producers: Dave Bishop, Vanessa Saal, Steve Coogan, Carolyn Marks Blackwood, Marco Mehlitz, Alexander Schoeller, Harriet Von Ladiges, Daniel Bruhl
Director of photography: Stephane Fontaine
Editor: Isabelle Devinck
Production designer: Sebastian Soukup
Costume designer: Nicole Fischnaller
Casting: Anja Dihrberg, Theo Park

93 minutes


https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/my-zoe-review-1238096

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 12.09.2019, 14:46 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Richards Review-Tipps:

Bild

https://twitter.com/RCArmitage/status/1171887610345787392

Bild

https://twitter.com/RCArmitage/status/1171887378203648002


Zitat:
Letter From Toronto: Noah Baumbach’s ‘Marriage Story’ and Julie Delpy’s ‘My Zoe’ Offer a Split View of Divorce

The two films treat the same subject matter, but the difference in perspective is vast

Sharon Waxman | September 10, 2019 @ 1:44 PM Last Updated: September 10, 2019 @ 2:04

Two different movies about divorce. One written and directed by a man, Noah Baumbach. The other written and directed by a woman, Julie Delpy.

“Marriage Story” is winning Baumbach all kinds of attention for diving deep into the pain of contemporary divorce. Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson love and hate each other as they pull their family apart, trying to solve the unsolveable. How do you protect what is true and sacred about a loving past, even as the center of the marriage doesn’t hold?

Meanwhile, “My Zoe” reflects a remarkably similar pain, but told from a female perspective. Delpy, who plays the wife, leaves her husband, played by Richard Armitage.

In both films, there is a young child who is the subject of custody strife. In both films, the well-intentioned parents end up using the child as a tool to punish the other spouse. And in both films, the couples veer back and forth from taking care of one another in the daily way that families do to wounding one other in the way that divorcing couples do.

But though the two films treat the same subject matter, the difference in perspective is vast.

In “Zoe,” Delpy’s Isabelle has opted for an escape from a loveless and intimacy-starved union with Armitage’s James. But the film chooses not to judge Isabelle, even though she is the one who has strayed. Instead, James seems forlorn, angry and bitter. He accuses Isabelle of being selfish for leaving him, but his unpleasant character doesn’t make his argument terribly convincing. And while James seems distracted as a father, Isabelle cherishes every moment with their daughter, Zoe (this ends up being a major plot point).

Baumbach, who often uses autobiography as fodder for his films, may have intended to be even-handed in creating his two lead characters in the midst of divorce, but “Marriage Story” emerges as Charlie’s. Throughout, Driver’s character is the victim of his wife’s need for freedom. While Charlie strayed from the marital bed, it is Nicole (Johansson) who walked out on the family, citing Charlie’s selfishness and the never-clear argument that her voice is not being heard in the marriage. It’s Nicole who hires the shark divorce lawyer (Laura Dern), while Charlie tries to negotiate a reasonable settlement with the avuncular Alan Alda as his lawyer. It’s Nicole who takes their son to live in California, forcing Charlie to leave his thriving career in New York to be a good parent.

The difference between the two perspectives underlines how significant it can be whether a male or female gaze is behind the camera.

In an interview with TheWrap, Delpy said that she struggled for six years to make the movie and that financiers did not understand why she made James so unsympathetic.

“A lot of people didn’t want the man to be that dark: ‘But there’s no bad guys in this version?'” she said in an interview at TheWrap’s studio. “‘I said, ‘I’m sorry, sometimes there is.’ The character of James is so angry at her because she left him for someone else that I wanted to show that men aren’t always the great guys that say, ‘OK, take the house, I’ll give you money, take the child.”’

She went on: “Not all men are kind. And not all women are kind, but it would be unfair for it to be middle of the road… For me, it needed to be something that grabs you.”

In two remarkably parallel centerpiece scenes in each movie, the two couples attack one another, flinging vicious insults that expose their most raw emotions and the depth of their pain. In “Zoe,” James accuses Isabelle of taking a lover who sleeps with her just to get a visa, and she shoots back with a searing stare rather than a denial: “He f—s me so well it might just be worth it.”

When Nicole and Charlie have their argument, she accuses Charlie of selfishness, over and over. But Charlie’s frustration is palpable and real. He is a reasonable man, struggling to understand why his wife up and left him. He says the terrible things that get said in such moments and collapses to his knees in regret. And later in the film when Charlie stands and sings a touching ballad to his New York friends, he wins over the audience completely.

There are other moments that illustrate the contrasting points of view. In a sharp-tongued lecture to Nicole, Laura Dern’s lawyer warns her that in the custody battle, she does not have the luxury of being anything but a perfect mother. A man, Dern says, can be the most desultory father and still get custody. But a woman must be perfect to not have her children taken from her. The lecture is meant to underscore the lawyer’s cynicism. But it resulted in an eruption of applause in the theater where I saw the film.

Both films remind the viewer that there’s no one who knows best how to cause you pain than the person who has loved you for years. And that in many divorces there are no villains, only victims.

It just depends who gets to determine which is which.

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 15.09.2019, 22:57 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Noch eine Review:

Zitat:
‘My Zoe’: Toronto Review

By Tim Grierson, Senior US Critic


‘My Zoe’

Dir/scr: Julie Delpy. Germany/France. 2019. 102mins

The incalculable depth of a parent’s grief provides the narrative engine for My Zoe, a provocative look at motherhood and loss and a film that takes daring risks which don’t always pay off. Writer-director-star Julie Delpy sets the audience up with a horrifying, yet straightforward melodramatic premise — a divorcing couple are forced to spend time together after their beloved daughter becomes gravely ill — but then she shifts tones, entering unexpected territory that intentionally strains credibility in order to raise ethical and moral questions. Delpy should be credited for her audaciousness, and My Zoe is a film which is often more interesting theoretically than it is to experience in the moment.

The passion in the performance is formidable

Delpy plays Isabelle, a geneticist living in Berlin who is finalising her antagonistic divorce from James (Armitage), the real bone of contention being how they’ll split custody of young Zoe (Sophia Ally), the daughter they both adore. But one morning, Isabelle goes into Zoe’s room to find her unresponsive, triggering a trip to the hospital and the alarming diagnosis that the girl has slipped into a coma.

In its opening reels, My Zoe appears to be a marital drama in which Isabelle and James will relitigate what went wrong in their relationship while worrying over their daughter, both of them blaming the other spouse for Zoe’s mysterious ailment. It’s difficult to discuss Delpy’s film without spoiling what follows, but after comedies such as 2 Days In Paris and Lolo, here she’s working in a sombre, darker, even more futuristic vein, chronicling Isabelle’s relentless quest to save her daughter — even through illegal means.

Those measures seriously disrupt My Zoe’s tenor — not to mention alter the movie’s very genre — which allows Delpy to boldly question how this woman of science can become so irrational, even if it’s for the benefit of her girl. But the outrageousness of Isabelle’s plan is so pronounced that it can feel implausible — an unconvincing plot device meant to goad discussion rather than be a reasonable escalation of this mother’s desperation. As a result, My Zoe’s later sections, where the focus shifts to a controversial doctor (Daniel Brühl) working in Moscow, play out as intellectual and theoretical — we lose our connection to Isabelle’s anguish because it morphs into a story device to discuss the role of mothers and the murky waters of reproductive rights.

Nonetheless, Delpy’s fearless commitment to playing this unreasonably stubborn mother remains striking throughout. Again and again, the filmmaker-actress dares us to dismiss Isabelle’s probably hopeless pursuit, but our scepticism is part of My Zoe’s larger point: no one can imagine what a mother would do for her offspring — or what pain she might feel if she were to lose that child. The more preposterous My Zoe gets, the more ensconced in her grief Isabelle is. Armitage capably plays an ex-husband who’s torn between falling back in love with his wife and walking away, but the movie is Delpy’s showcase as her character pushes further and further, convinced that her Zoe can still be saved. The passion in the performance is formidable.


https://www.screendaily.com/reviews/my-zoe-toronto-review/5142848.article#.XXpI8SVr6BE.twitter

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 18.09.2019, 09:36 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Eine besonders positive Review:

Zitat:
‘My Zoe’, ‘Anne’ Stand Tall in Two-Tier Platform at TIFF 2019

Pat Mullen by Pat Mullen | September 17, 2019, 6:30 pm

TIFF’s Platform competition became a two-tier program in 2019. The ten-film line-up boasted a bizarre range of quality with the two best films, Julie Delpy’s My Zoe and Kazik Radwanski’s Anne at 13,000 ft, towering above the competition. While Platform has always been inconsistent, even the lesser films in the slate usually try something new and merit the festival spotlight. That was not the case in 2019 with a near-homogenous and mostly forgettable line-up. It was an off year for TIFF’s most promising showcase in its fifth iteration.


Strong Women vs. Shitty Men

This year’s competition seemed to be programmed around a central theme: women on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Seven of the ten films centred on a female protagonist in a tailspin. The context and the particulars varied film by film, but overall they weren’t much different. Some characters were brilliantly and complexly constructed. Others flew off the rails for the sake of it.

While this line-up demonstrated TIFF’s commitment towards furthering stories with strong female leads, Platform of 2019 frustrated from a representational point of view because of how the festival chose to portray men in its competitive spotlight. Virtually every male character in every Platform film was either a rapist, a misogynist, an abuser, a jerk, a douchebag, a crook, a deadbeat, or altogether absent. The view of men projected here is cause for concern. One doesn’t need to put down one group in order to elevate another.


Sound of Metal

Perhaps the lone standout in the field of stories of shitty men was Sound of Metal, the dramatic directorial debut of Place Beyond the Pines writer Darius Marder. While it ran an hour too long with its needlessly lethargic duration of 140 minutes, Sound of Metal features a bravura performance by Riz Ahmed as a drummer who loses his hearing after one concert too many.

The film takes audiences through the experience of deafness with a phenomenal sound design. It puts audiences inside the heads of the hearing impaired. Subjective sound conveys a world of muffled noises and indiscernible sounds, while distortion and clamour disorient a viewer when the story broaches the topic of cochlear implants. Presented with closed captioning for the hearing impaired, Sound of Metal adds to the complexity of representational programming in Platform. Although clearly empathetic with deaf viewers, it’s ultimately made for a hearing audience. The intricacy of its sound design is key to every emotional bear and nuance of the film.

Also problematic is the fact that Platform devoted 20% of its line-up to Argentinian-Uruguayan co-productions. Fans looking for great Latin American cinema could only find the two worst films of the line-up, and the festival overall: Federico Veiroj’s The Moneychanger and Paula Hernández’s The Sleepwalkers. Both films are beneath a competitive line-up: Moneychanger for its utterly pedestrian story of an arrogant banker/money launderer and Sleepwalkers with its cavalcade of horny lunatics. The former film centres on an arrogant male lead, while the latter film features an ensemble of characters flying off the rails with irrational, unmotivated, and unconvincing behaviour.

As the lone “comedy” in the line-up, Moneychanger offers few laughs. Each joke lands with a thud thanks to Daniel Hendler’s unbearably annoying performance. Hendler did double-duty in Platform with a mercifully brief supporting turn in Sleepwalkers. His presence in the line-up underscores the absence of better films that could have taken a slot in the competition. For example, documentaries were entirely absent from Platform for the fourth consecutive year. If TIFF programmed Moneychanger and Sleepwalkers as some sort of package deal, one hopes they kept the receipts.


Working Women: Proxima and Wet Season

Stories of working women and motherhood see mixed results in the competition titles Proxima, directed by Alice Winocour, and Wet Season from director Anthony Chen. Both films feature female protagonists wrestling with their careers and their aspirations as a parent. Proxima offers a strong performance by Eva Green as Sarah, a woman readying for a mission to space who encounters workplace sexism and struggles with her daughter’s emotional detachment.

Although Winocour probes deeply into the details of the astronaut program and illustrates how women excel in a field traditionally dominated by men, Proxima is a bit too on-the-nose with its misogyny. Its most creative spark is having Sarah’s co-worker make a joke that she’s there for her French cooking. Two other TIFF films about women in flight, The Aeronauts and Lucy in the Sky, deal with these same concerns more creatively and with more nuanced, while providing grander cinematic adventures compared to Proxima’s near-clinical workplace drama. It’s a cold movie—so cold one could declare it clinically dead.

Wet Season, meanwhile, suffers from the same peculiarly irrational behaviour that defines many Platform films. Yeo Yann Yann stars as Ling, a Malaysian woman in Singapore who teaches Chinese and longs to have a baby. In the absence of her deadbeat drunk of a husband, she befriends a struggling student (Koh Jia Ler) and confronts the apparent pointlessness of her life. Chen demonstrates a fine hand at direction and makes good on the promise of his debut Ilo Ilo by incorporating the weather and the disheartening dampness of wet season to convey Ling’s despair. As a writer, however, Chen’s characters feel inauthentic as their icky situation takes predictable turns, leading to some handsomely composed shots with eye-roll inducing drama. Wet Season isn’t the sum of its arresting images—pretty to look at, but hard to care.


Working Men: Martin Eden and Workforce

One can say the same for the competition’s winner, Martin Eden by Pietro Marcello. Martin Eden boasts luminous 16mm cinematography, but it’s an exercise in patience. This Italian adaptation of Jack London’s novel struggles with pacing and narrative incoherence. It has a strong, loud, and bellowing performance by Luca Marinelli in the title role. Embodying the prototypical Angry Young Man, Marinelli, who won Best Actor at Venice, elevates Marin Eden. It’s a full-blooded interpretation of London’s character. But the film’s essay on class, wealth, and privilege doesn’t quite measure up to David Zonana’s fellow Platform title Workforce, a film that says more with less.

Workforce, the lone debut feature in competition, is minimalism at its finest. Zonana’s film offers a parable of working class inequity as it observes the lives of construction workers at a luxury home who become motivated when a bizarre accident leaves their co-worker dead and his widow penniless. Their employer and the homeowner place no value on the lives that commit themselves to constructing a luxury home before retiring to impoverished dwellings, and they continue to swindle the workers at every turn.
Advertisements

Workforce takes a dark turn. Francisco (Luis Alberti), the victim’s brother, leads a small-scale social uprising when their search for justice encounters one bureaucratic delay after another. Using an array of long shots and meticulously composed tableaus, Workforce conveys the power of a united front. It observes the details of working class life and labour that are often outside the frame. Zonana’s humorous and damning essay is an assured first feature.


Rocks Rocks

Another stronger entry is Sarah Gavron’s fifth feature Rocks, which was Platform’s opening night film. This powerful film drops audiences into the world of Nigerian teen Shola (Bukky Bakray), aka Rocks, during a life-altering event. Bakray is excellent as the young woman forced to grow up too soon when she is left to care for her little brother, Emmanuel, after her mother abandons them. Gavron’s film finds its power in observing the resilience of its heroine without sugarcoating the ordeal. The film is frank and sobering with its portrait of love that endured in the worst of situations as Rocks and Emmanuel provided each other strength.

Rocks also stands out with its tale of female friendship. As Rocks balances everyday growing pains with her living situation, her friends are rocks that anchor her. Gavron’s hand talent behind the camera is obvious through the performances she draws from the young ensemble. Her trust in the young actors sees ample rewards. The film’s youthful vitality brings an energy and authentic voice one hoped to find in the festival.

If any Platform film can be defined by its breathtaking energy though, that title goes to Kazik Radwanski’s excellent Anne at 13000 ft. The film doesn’t waste a second of its sparse 76-minute running time. Each frame propels its character forward into a tailspin. The film boasts the standout performance of the festival in Deragh Campbell’s committed turn as the titular Anne, a 27-year-old daycare worker who cracks under the pressure of societal expectations.

The role is physically and emotionally demanding as Anne unravels. She finds herself in free-fall—perfectly realized in the sky-diving scenes that add heart-pounding intensity throughout the film. Campbell keeps the film real and grounded no matter how seemingly irrational Anne behaves. Radwanski’s immediate verité style harnesses the raw power of Campbell’s performance for maximal effect. This character-driven white knuckler leaves a viewer breathless and terrified—but completely transfixed by the woman unravelling on screen. It’s one of the most exciting and original films from the Toronto scene in recent memory.


Best in Show: My Zoe

The title for best in show, however, goes to Julie Delpy’s breathtaking custody drama My Zoe. Delpy reinvents herself as a filmmaker and gives her best performance to date with My Zoe. This film is the biggest surprise of the festival overall and the true out-of-the-gate masterpiece at TIFF. To reveal much of what happens would be a disservice to this tale of a custody battle gone tragically awry. Delpy’s divorcée Isabelle fights with all her heart to keep her daughter Zoe (Sophia Ally) following a difficult split from her ex-husband James (Richard Armitage). Delpy and the cast craft every character with depth and down-to-earth emotion, which makes the drama doubly harrowing. There are no easy outs in this emotional minefield that Delpy navigates.

My Zoe brilliantly exploits the power of the unexpected. The film keeps a viewer dancing with anticipation as one turn reveals another. Delpy’s drama takes audiences to places they never imagined they would be going from the outset of the film. Delpy bends genres and subtly, almost imperceptibly, reveals the world in which her drama exists. Each twist brings a new emotional turn as Delpy ensures that audiences are as deeply invested in Isabelle’s plight as she is.

Delpy performs triple duty as writer, actor, and director, and she excels at all three tasks. While she’s always been excellent as both an actor and a writer, My Zoe is a major leap forward for Delpy as a director. She is in uncharted territory here. Zoe is far from the neurotic characters of the Woody Allen-ish 2 Days in Paris and Lolo, and the no-frills allure of Richard Linklater’s Before trilogy. If My Zoe bears any resemblance to Delpy’s previous work, it’s simply in the complexity of her characters, her attention to cinematic space and time, and her willingness to be bold.

Delpy’s direction is assured, confident, and precise. She provokes difficult questions engaging with both the heart and the mind. Each twist and turn of My Zoe reveals to audiences how difficult, but necessary, it is to listen to both at the same time. As cerebral as it is heartbreaking, My Zoe is a highly ambitious film about the power of a mother’s love. Even in an off year, Platform is the place to find the next generation of auteurs at the festival.


https://thatshelf.com/my-zoe-anne-stand-tall-in-two-tier-platform-at-tiff-2019/

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 18.09.2019, 11:18 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Zwei konträre Einschätzungen auf Deutsch:

Zitat:
TORONTO Tag 8: Spiel mir das Lied vom Tod

Vom Leben im Ausnahmezustand erzählen viele Filme auf dem Toronto International Film Festival. Drei davon machen es auf ausgesprochen interessante Art und Weise.


12.09.2019 22:48 • von Thomas Schultze

Julie Delpy zeigt mit "My Zoe" ihre bislang beste Regiearbeit (Bild: TIFF)

Es fällt schon auf, wenn man binnen zwei Wochen in Venedig und Toronto rund 40 Filme gesehen hat, wie sehr das Thema Krankheit, Sterben und Trauerarbeit der Umgang Filmemachern aktuell ein Anliegen ist. Wahrscheinlich ist es ein Zufall: Filmprojekte entstehen über mehrere Jahre der Entwicklung, Finanzierung und Produktion. Aber natürlich beginnt sich für den Zuschauer ein größeres Bild zu formen, wenn man in kürzester Zeit so geballt mit der Fragilität und Endlichkeit des menschlichen Lebens konfrontiert wird. Vielleicht beschäftigt man sich unweigerlich mit dem Sterben, wenn man damit konfrontiert wird, dass der Planet, auf dem wir leben, am Abgrund steht. Bloß nichts überinterpretieren - da mag der Festivalkoller aus einem sprechen. Lieber also die Filme für sich betrachten, wie es fair und angemessen ist.

Besonders beeindruckend ist der neue Film von Julie Delpy, My Zoe", eine majoritär deutsche Produktion der auf internationale Koproduktionen spezialisierten Amusement Park, die Malte Grunert gemeinsam mit Daniel Brühl leitet, und fast komplett in Berlin entstanden. Die französische Schauspielerin hat sich in den letzten Jahren immer mehr aufs Filmemachen verlegt. Nach Titeln wie 2 Tage Paris", Die Gräfin" und zuletzt Lolo - Drei ist einer zu viel" ist ihre nunmehr siebte Spielfilmarbeit ein spürbarer Quantensprung, ein intensives Drama, das konzentrierter und konsequenter kaum sein könnte und mit großem Mut in thematische Bereiche vorstößt, in die sich vermutlich nicht viele Filmemacher trauen würden: "Friedhof der Kuscheltiere" ohne den Horroraspekt. Um den Tod eines Kindes geht und den Fallout für eine geschiedene Genetikerin in Berlin, die ihre Tochter nach dem Ende einer verzehrenden Beziehung alleine großzieht. Grob in drei Abschnitte eingeteilt, die sich durch lange Schwarzblenden ankündigen, macht "My Zoe" nicht nur zeitlich große Sprünge, sondern ändert auch jeweils Stil und Temperatur, ohne allerdings jemals den roten Faden zu verlieren.

Im ersten Teil ist der Film noch ein Beziehungsdrama, in dessen Mittelpunkt die Konfrontation von Isabelle, so der Name der von Delpy selbst gespielten Hauptfigur, mit ihrem Ex James (Richard Armitage aus "Der Hobbit") steht. Danach rückt der Fokus auf Isabelle und ihre Tochter Zoe, die nach einem Unfall auf der Intensivstation landet, wo sich ihr Zustand zunehmend verschlechtert. Im letzten Abschnitt springt der Film in die Zukunft, beginnt Züge eines Science-Fiction-Films zu tragen, wenn Isabelle, unfähig mit dem Verlust ihrer Tochter umzugehen, sich an einen befreundeten Wissenschaftler in Moskau wendet und zu einer letzten verzweifelten Maßnahme greift, ihr in tausende Einzelteile zersprungenes Leben wieder zusammensetzen zu können. Es liegt im Wesen der Sache, dass einem "My Zoe" an die Nieren geht. Aber Julie Delpy ist als Filmemacherin längst so souverän und gereift, dass es ihr gelingt, ihre Geschichte immer so zu erzählen, dass man als Zuschauer im jeweiligen Abschnitt der Handlung im Unklaren darüber bleibt, wohin die Reise im nächsten Abschnitt gehen wird. Und eine Reise ist "My Zoe", an die Grenzen dessen, wozu eine Mutter aus Liebe zu ihrem Kind bereit ist. In Toronto gab es Beifall und viel Lob. Jetzt folgen hoffentlich entsprechende Verkäufe ins Ausland: Die hat dieser beeindruckende Drahtseilakt mit seinem Schluss, der einem den Boden unter den Füßen wegzieht, verdient.

Ums Sterben geht es auch in "Blackbird", dem neuen Film des Briten Roger Michell, dem es unmöglich ist, einen uninteressanten Film zu machen, ob es sich nun um großen Mainstream handelt wie Notting Hill" oder kleinere Dramen wie Enduring Love", "Venus" oder "Le Weekend", die ihm mehr und mehr am Herzen liegen. In dieser Tradition steht nun auch dieses Drama, ein englischsprachiges Remake von Bille Augusts Silent Heart - Mein Leben gehört mir" aus dem Jahr 2014, in dem eine tödlich erkrankte Matriarchin einmal noch ihre beiden Töchter und deren Familien sowie ihre von Kindheitsbeinen an beste Freundin zu einem gemeinsamen Wochenende auf ihr prächtiges Anwesen einlädt. Ihre Pläne, dass sie ihrem Leben am Ende des Wochenendes mit einem Giftcocktail ein Ende setzen will, weil sie selbst den Zeitpunkt ihres Todes bestimmen will, bevor es ihre schnell fortschreitende Krankheit zulässt, sind allen bewusst, werden dann aber dann doch wieder in Zweifel gezogen, als die angespannte Stimmung verborgene Geheimnisse zu Tage fördert. All die Dinge passieren, die immer passieren, wenn Familien zu Festivitäten zusammenkommen - oder zumindest, wenn sie in Filmen zusammenkommen. Und trotzdem ist "Blackbird", phänomenal besetzt mit Susan Sarandon (in einer Rolle, die ursprünglich Diane Keaton zugedacht war), Sam Neill, 'Kate Winslet (die hier exakt so aussieht wie Tina Fey), Mia Wasikowska und Lindsay Duncan, anders, weil Michell immer einen etwas anderen Blick wirft und seinen Figuren Makel und Macken zugesteht, die sie angenehm menschlich und verletzlich wirken lassen.

Das Überleben in einem extremen Schwebezustand steht im Mittelpunkt des überragend gelungenen Regiedebüts von Darius Marder, der sich einen Namen gemacht hat als Drehbuchautor von The Place Beyond the Pines": "Sound of Metal" erzählt die Geschichte eines von Riz Ahmed mit elektrisch nervöser Energie gespielter Energie eines Schlagzeugers eines Blackmetalduos, Ruben, der von einem Tag auf den anderen sein Gehör zu verlieren scheint. Zunächst klingt es in seinen Ohren nur, als würde er sich unter Wasser befinden, aber alsbald schon löst sich seine Außenwelt akustisch in ein weißes Rauschen auf: Er ist fast komplett gehörlos, an eine Zukunft als Musiker ist nicht mehr zu denken. Und vor allem ist die mühsam erarbeitete Balance in Gefahr, mit der er sich an den eigenen Haaren aus dem Drogensumpf gezogen hat. In einer auf dem Land liegenden Einrichtung für gehörlose Drogenabhängige soll Ruben wieder zu sich finden und mit seiner Beeinträchtigung leben lernen, eine Sisyphus-Arbeit: Jeder Fortschritt zieht automatisch gleich wieder Rückschläge hinter sich. Vor allem aber hat Rugen den Traum nicht aufgegeben, mit Hilfe einer kostspieligen Operation doch wieder hören zu können. Selten hat ein Film wohl ein so ausgeklügeltes Tonkonzept gehabt wie "Sound of Metal": Virtuos gelingt es Marder, das Gezeigte wie mit Rubens Ohren und dann wieder als unbeteiligter Außenstehender mitzuhören. Und dann gibt es noch eine Szene, in der der Musiker vom Leiter der Einrichtung konfrontiert wird: Was Paul Raci, ein Vietnamveteran, der im Krieg sein Gehör verlor, als eine Bombe neben ihm explodierte, und sein Trauma danach mit Alkohol bekämpfte, in dieser Szene zeigt, geht weit über übliche Schauspielerei hinaus: Er spielt sich als Joe quasi selbst, und was er Ruben mit auf den Weg gibt, hat eine Eindringlichkeit, dass man seine Worte so schnell nicht mehr vergisst.

Thomas Schultze


http://beta.blickpunktfilm.de/details/443659


Zitat:
My Zoe (2019)

Drama Grossbritannien, Deutschland, Frankreich

Filmkritik: Gone Girl!

44th Toronto International Film Festival


Die Ehe von Isabelle (Julie Delpy) und James (Richard Armitage) ging schon vor einer Weile in der Brüche, doch aufgrund der gemeinsamen Tochter Zoe (Sophia Ally) müssen sich die Geschiedenen notgedrungen immer mal wieder sehen - und das scheint beiden nicht wirklich zu passen. Dann eines Morgens der Schock: Zoe wacht nach einer Nacht bei Isabelle nicht mehr auf. Die Ambulanz wird gerufen, welche das kleine Mädchen sofort auf die Intensivstation bringt. Wenig später kommt der Moment, der Isabelle und James für immer verändern wird und aufgrund dessen Isabelle einen Weg einschlägt, der moralisch mehr als fragwürdig ist.

Wer bei My Zoe genau hinsieht, wird merken, dass die Geschichte des Filmes wohl nicht im Veröffentlichungsjahr 2019 spielt, sondern in einer "nicht weit entfernten Zukunft". Weshalb das so ist, wird in der zweiten Hälfte des Filmes offensichtlich, in welcher das Ganze nach einem durchaus überzeugenden ersten Teil völlig abstürzt. Der Film schlägt eine Richtung ein, von der man inständig hofft, dass er sie bitte nicht einschlagen möge (auch wenn sich dies von der Storyentwicklung her gesehen nicht umgehen liess). Über den Inhalt des Gesehenen kann diskutiert werden, aber wie es dargestellt wird, wirkt furchtbar abgedroschen. So bleibt nach anfänglichen Tränen nur noch das Kopfschütteln.

12.09.2019 / crs


https://outnow.ch/Movies/2019/MyZoe/Review/

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 27.10.2019, 16:35 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
'My Zoe' mit deutscher Tonspur und der Filmkritik von Steven Gätjen in der ZDF-Mediathek:

https://www.zdf.de/show/gaetjens-grosses-kino/gaetjens-grosses-kino-my-zoe-100.html

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 01.11.2019, 15:02 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Verheerende 2-Sterne Kritik von

Zitat:
My Zoe

Was lange währt, wird doch nicht immer gut


Von Oliver Kube

Schon Mitte der 1990er begann die Schauspielerin, Drehbuchautorin und Regisseurin Julie Delpy mit den Arbeiten an ihrem mit Sci-Fi- und Thriller-Elementen gespickten Melodram „My Zoe“. Die ursprüngliche Idee zu den zentralen moralischen Dilemmata kam ihr, als sie sich bei der Arbeit an der „Drei Farben“-Trilogie ausführlich mit dem legendären Filmemacher Krzysztof Kieślowski über die Themen Elternschaft, Liebe, Verlust und Schicksal unterhielt. 2016 sah es dann endlich so aus, als ob die Französin ihr langgehegtes Herzensprojekt endlich würde realisieren können. Doch dann stieg einer der Hauptfinanciers nur Wochen vor dem geplanten Produktionsstart plötzlich aus, weil sein neuer US-Anwalt ihm dazu geraten hatte. Anstatt nach Vorwänden und Ausreden zu suchen, sagte man der zweifach oscarnominierten Delpy geradewegs ins Gesicht, dass man nun doch nicht in ein Werk investieren wolle, bei dem eine Frau am Ruder stünde. Weibliche Regisseure wären einfach zu emotional und unzuverlässig, hieß es kurz und knapp.

Julie Delpy war aufgrund dieser Zurschaustellung von unverblümtem Sexismus und des gigantischen Lochs in ihrem Budget verständlicherweise am Boden zerstört. Bereit aufzugeben war sie aber nicht. Mit Hilfe der Produktionsfirma ihres befreundeten Kollegen Daniel Brühl, der bereits zuvor zugesagt hatte, vor der Kamera eine essenzielle Rolle zu übernehmen, wurden neue Geldgeber aufgetan. Die ermöglichten, mit anderthalbjähriger Verzögerung doch noch den Dreh in Berlin und Moskau anzugehen. Bei einer solchen Vorgeschichte wäre es natürlich besonders schön gewesen, wenn der trotz allem fertiggestellte Film dann ein richtiger Triumph geworden wäre. Doch leider haben sich Durchhaltevermögen und Engagement aller Beteiligten künstlerisch nicht wirklich ausgezahlt.

Die in der deutschen Bundeshauptstadt als Genetikerin arbeitende Franko-Amerikanerin Isabelle (Julie Delpy) und ihr britischer Mann James (Richard Armitage) stehen vor den Scherben ihrer Ehe. Nun beginnt das Tauziehen um das Sorgerecht für die gemeinsame Tochter Zoe (Sophia Ally). Beide wollen für die Kleine da sein und den anderen mit allen Mitteln ausstechen. In ihrem neuen Lover Akil (Saleh Bakri) findet Isabelle einen Verbündeten, der ihr in stressigen Zeiten beisteht. Da kommt es eines Nachts zu einer plötzlichen Hirnblutung bei Zoe. Wenig später ist das sofort ins Krankenhaus eingelieferte Mädchen tot. Doch ihre Mutter weigert sich, die Tatsache mit allen Konsequenzen zu akzeptieren. Sie entnimmt Gewebeproben vom leblosen Körper ihres Kindes und reist nach Moskau. Dort unterhält der deutsche Kollege Dr. Fischer (Daniel Brühl) eine trotz zweifelhafter Reputation florierende Praxis für künstliche Befruchtung...

Julie Delpy, die die meisten natürlich durch ihre Rolle als Celine in Richard Linklaters bittersüßer, dialoggetriebener „Before Sunrise“-Trilogie kennen, hat als Regisseurin bisher vor allem mit seichteren Stoffen wie „2 Tage Paris“ und der Fortsetzung „2 Tage New York“ Erfolge gefeiert. „My Zoe“ startet nun auch mit einer sanften, harmlos anmutenden Szene, in der Gemma Arterton („Hänsel und Gretel: Hexenjäger“) ihren Babybauch streichelt. In Wahrheit ist der sanfte Einstieg aber schon eine Andeutung für das ambivalenten Finale, dass die Zuschauer offensichtlich zu möglichst hitzigen und spannenden Diskussionen nach dem Verlassen des Kinosaals anstacheln soll.

Auf dem Weg zu diesem Finale gilt es für den Zuschauer allerdings einiges an Holprigkeiten zu überstehen. So braucht die Einführung, inklusive Vorstellung von Isabelle und ihrem Verhältnis zu sowohl ihrer süßen Tochter als auch ihrem Ex, einfach viel zu lange. Es ist schnell offensichtlich, dass Mann und Frau einfach nicht mehr miteinander können und ihre Zwistigkeiten beziehungsweise individuellen Eitelkeiten ungewollt auf dem schmalen Rücken von Zoe austragen. Trotzdem sehen wir mindestens drei oder vier „Kramer gegen Kramer“-Szenen zu viel – Zeit, die besser darin investiert worden wäre, dem Publikum von Anfang an zu vermitteln, dass sich die Handlung nicht in der Gegenwart, sondern eine paar Jahre in der Zukunft abspielt.

So sorgt ein sich etwa zur Mitte der Laufzeit zutragender Moment, in dem Isabelle frustriert ihren Tablet-Computer wie ein Stück Pappe zusammenknüllt und in die Ecke wirft, erst einmal für Verwirrung. Später gibt es noch weitere solcher Zukunfts-Gadgets, die letztlich aber nur Beiwerk sind. Dass wir uns im Jahr 2024 befinden, wird nur irgendwann mit einer beiläufigen Bemerkung erwähnt. Dabei wäre nicht unwichtig gewesen, diesen Umstand zu kennen, wenn der Film von einer intensiven Familientragödie mit dem Abschalten von Zoes Beatmungsgeräten quasi im Handumdrehen in Richtung einer visuell recht kalten, thematisch dystopisch angehauchten Episode von „Black Mirror“ oder „The Outer Limits“ mutiert. Auf einmal sind wir dann nämlich im hier offenbar zum moralischen Wilden Westen verkommenen Moskau und sitzen mit Isabelle im Warteraum der leicht spacig anmutenden Praxis von Dr. Fischer, die gefüllt ist mit schwangeren Frauen aller Altersstufen.

Klar, Delpy wollte Isabelle in ihrer Eigenschaft als starke, unabhängige Frau etablieren. Das wäre aber sicher auch knapper und subtiler gegangen. So wirkt ihre Entscheidung, sich gegen das Schicksal als trauernde Mutter zu stellen, nicht aus spontaner Verzweiflung geboren, sondern kühl, überlegt und fast wie von langer Hand vorbereitet. Was der Geschichte viel von ihrem Potenzial nimmt und dem Zuschauer allzu früh die Möglichkeit gibt, eins und eins zusammen zu zählen, als wir die von Gemma Arterton verkörperte Figur aus der Eröffnungsszene wiedertreffen, die sich als Gattin von Dr. Fischer herausstellt.

Es ist schade um die guten Performances, allen voran von Daniel Brühl („Rush“) und July Delpy selbst, sowie die atmosphärischen Bilder von Kameramann Stéphane Fontaine („Elle“). Aber so dürften sich die Unterhaltungen des Publikums nach dem Abspann weniger darum drehen, wie weit wir als Menschen mit neuen Technologien gehen sollten oder dürfen, als eher darum, zu welchem Zeitpunkt Kinogängerin X die finale Wendung vorausgesehen oder Zuschauer Y aufgrund der krassen tonalen Unstimmigkeit zwischen erster und zweiter Filmhälfte das Interesse verloren hat.

Fazit: Zwei Hälften, die kein Ganzes ergeben. Julie Delpy verhebt sich mit ihrer siebten Regiearbeit und liefert einen visuell attraktiven, engagiert gespielten, erzählerisch aber arg unstimmigen Genre-Mix mit einer schon früh aus dem Gleis springenden Story.


http://www.filmstarts.de/kritiken/252211/kritik.html

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 07.11.2019, 19:16 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Eine deutlich wohlwollendere Kritik, die dabei Mängel durchaus nicht verschweigt:

Zitat:
Frankensteins Tochter

In "My Zoe" stellt Regisseurin und Hauptdarstellerin Julie Delpy eine brisante Frage: Wie weit würden Eltern nach dem Tod ihres Kindes gehen, wenn es möglich wäre, einen Menschen zu klonen?


"Ich dachte, wir helfen uns dabei, sie loszulassen" sagt Isabelles verhasster Ex-Mann zu seiner Frau am Sterbebett der gemeinsamen Tochter. "Ich werde sie nie loslassen", antwortet die ihres Lebenssinns beraubte Mutter und kühle Genforscherin. Nach dieser Eröffnungsszene - die das Ende des Dramas leider recht auffällig vorwegnimmt - lernt man zunächst die frisch geschiedene, in Berlin lebende Franko-Amerikanerin Isabelle (Julie Delpy) und ihren britischen Ex-Mann James (Richard Armitage) kennen. Die beiden haben eine gemeinsame Tochter namens Zoe (Sophia Ally), die zwischen den beiden nach Absprache hin- und herpendelt, bis die Sorgerechtsfrage endgültig geklärt ist.

Erschreckend unfähig, noch normal miteinander zu kommunizieren, feilschen beide um jede Stunde mit ihrer geliebten Tochter und nutzen jede Gelegenheit, um dem anderen gegenüber sein tiefes Misstrauen auszudrücken. James, der zudem über die Trennung noch nicht hinweggekommen und eifersüchtig ist, weil Isabelle einen neuen Freund hat, strebt sogar zwanghaft danach, Isabelle immer wieder zutiefst zu verletzen. Selten hat man im Kino eine komplexere und deprimierendere Charakterstudie eines frisch getrennten Paares gesehen. Die fehlende Filmmusik unterstreicht dies noch.

Eines Morgens, nachdem Zoe bei Isabelle übernachtet hat, wacht sie nicht mehr auf. Hirnblutung, wahrscheinlich sogar irreparable Schäden, stellt man in der Klinik fest. Die Diagnose verschlechtert sich von Tag zu Tag, ein Schicksalsschlag, der dem Film eine völlig neue Richtung gibt, der man als Zuschauer zu folgen bereit sein muss. Dezente technische Gadgets einer nahen Zukunft - wie ein zerknüllbares Notepad - mehren sich, um den Zuschauer auf das Kommende vorzubereiten: In Moskau trifft sich Isabelle schon bald in einer gruseligen Praxis, in der schwangere Frauen - zum Teil weit jenseits der Menopause - im Wartezimmer sitzen, mit einem modernen Dr. Frankenstein (Daniel Brühl). Moralische, leider zum Teil auch mit dem erhobenen Zeigefinger geführte Debatten und fragwürdige Experimente lösen nun die zutiefst verfahrenen Beziehungsgespräche ab.

Eine schwierige Geburt

"My Zoe" ist Julie Delpys siebter Spielfilm, und wie so oft übernahm sie Regie, Drehbuch und Produktion und spielte auch die Hauptrolle. Die Idee zu ihrem Film sei ihr bereits in den 90er-Jahren gekommen, als sie in Krzysztof Kieślowskis "Drei Farben: Weiß" mitspielte, jenem Film, in dem der Pole geschickt Fragen zum menschlichen Schicksal stellte. Vor sechs Jahren dann verfasste Delpy, die mittlerweile ein Kind bekommen hatte und die schrecklichen Verlustängste von Eltern nun noch besser nachvollziehen konnte, schließlich die Geschichte um eine verzweifelte Mutter, die aus Liebe zu ihrem Kind ethische Grenzen überschreitet. 2016 wollte Delpy ihr Projekt endlich realisieren, hatte Schauspieler besetzt und stand kurz vor Beginn der Dreharbeiten. Doch die Produktionsfirma zog unerwartet ihre Geldmittel zurück.

"Die ganze Welt ist zusammengebrochen", erzählte sie kürzlich im Interview mit "IndieWire". Die Entscheidung der Produzenten sei sexistisch, weil man ihr als Frau einen solchen Film nicht zugetraut habe. Glücklicherweise hatte Delpys Schauspielkollege Daniel Brühl, mit dem sie seit ihrer Zusammenarbeit an ihrer dialogstarken Beziehungskomödie "Zwei Tage Paris" befreundet ist, keinerlei Bedenken. Er half ihr mit seiner jungen Produktionsfirma, neue Geldgeber zu finden. Zudem übernahm Brühl die Rolle des deutschen Genetikspezialisten, der im zweiten Drittel des Films in Russland seinen dubiosen Geschäften nachgeht.

Bedauerlicherweise verliert man in diesem dritten, bewusst kühl und distanziert erzählten Akt einen großen Teil der Empathie, die man Isabelle bislang entgegengebracht hatte. Das ist von Ausnahmeregisseurin Delpy, die für ihren Film kein Melodram im Sinn hatte, sicher beabsichtigt, führt aber von ihrem Ziel, eine ethische Debatte anzustoßen, eher fort. Dennoch ist die unheimliche Intensität, mit der Delpy die starke, moderne Frauenfigur verkörpert, und die Leidenschaft, mit der sie in einer immer noch von Männern dominierten Filmwelt ihr eigenwilliges Herzensprojekt durchgeboxt hat, in jedem Bild spürbar. Und das ist den Kinogang allemal wert.


https://www.blick.de/kino/frankensteins-tochter-artikel10654047?cvdkurzlink=x

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 07.11.2019, 21:20 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Schon vor einiger Zeit wurde diese positive Review (vier Sterne) veröffentlicht:

Zitat:
My Zoe Frankreich, Deutschland, Grossbritannien 2018 – 102min.

Cineman-Filmkritik 4.0

Irene Genhart

Julie Delpy verquickt einer Frau Trauer um ihre tote Tochter mit dem Dilemma der Reproduktionsgenetik. Sie punktet damit auf der ganzen Linie.

„Es gibt“, sagt Isabelle, "in keiner Sprache ein Wort für Eltern, welche ihr Kind verloren haben.“ Die Genforscherin lebt in Scheidung. Ihre Tochter Zoe pendelt zwischen ihr und ihrem Ex-Mann; Isabel und James liefern sich um die Ausformulierung für das geteilte Sorgerecht einen letzten heftigen Beziehungskampf. Derweil James, von Beruf Architekt, für Zoe stabile Zustände und einen geregelten Alltag für wichtig erachtet, ist die berufshalber oft abwesende Isabelle der Ansicht, dass der kerngesunden Siebenjährigen ein turbulentes Leben nicht schadet.

Dass das Verhältnis zwischen James und Isabelle schon seit Zoes Geburt angespannt ist, zeigt sich später. Da sitzen die beiden bangend im Wartezimmer der Berliner Uniklinik, wohin man die eines Morgens bewusstlos im Bett liegende Zoe gebracht hat. Von „wir geben unser Bestes“ über „gute Chancen“ bis zu „schweren Komplikationen“ dauert es wenige Tage: Man könne sich nun Zeit lassen, sagt der Arzt und meint weniger das Ausschalten der Körperfunktionen aufrechterhaltenden Maschinen, als die Unterzeichnung der Papiere zur Organfreigabe.

Bis hierher ist My Zoe ein typischer Julie Delpy-Film. Mit Delpy, die sich für Drehbuch und Regie ebenso verantwortlich zeichnet wie für die Produktion. Dabei spielt sie zugleich durchaus überzeugend die Hauptrolle dieser Frau, die beruflich durchstartet, mit Ex-Mann und neuem Freund gleich zwei Männer um sich arrangiert und ihrem Kind, das kluge Fragen nach der Big Bang-Theorie stellt, sich aber vor den Plüschtieren in seinem Zimmer fürchtet, selber komponierte Lieder vorsingt.

Kurz vor Zoes Tod hat Isabelle eine „naheliegende, aber verwerfliche“ Idee, wie es der Reproduktionsspezialist Dr. Thomas Fischer in seiner Klinik in Moskau später formuliert: Sie entnimmt Zoe beim letzten Besuch im Spital einige Hautzellen.

Julie Delpy greift in My Zoe einige brennend aktuelle, gesellschaftliche Themen auf. Die Gleichberechtigung von Mann und Frau und das Kindeswohl im Scheidungsfall. Die Fortschritte der Reproduktionsmedizin und in Zusammenhang damit dringliche Fragen der Ethik. Beginnend als Familiendrama, wandelt My Zoe zwischendurch auf den Spuren von Doktor Frankenstein, fängt sich aber wieder auf. Ein kluger, cleverer, letztlich warmherziger Film, gedreht von einer Frau. Und wie der von Daniel Brühl gespielte Doktor Fischer süffisant weiss, kennt zumindest eine Sprache einen Terminus für Eltern, die ihr Kind verloren haben: das Hebräische.


https://www.cineman.ch/movie/2019/MyZoe/review.html

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 12.11.2019, 19:33 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Eine vorsichtig positive Kritik:

Zitat:
My Zoe [2019]
Wertung: 4 von 6 Punkten | Kritik von Jens Adrian | Hinzugefügt am 17. Oktober 2019

Genre: Drama

Originaltitel: My Zoe
Laufzeit: 102 min.
Produktionsland: Großbritannien / Deutschland / Frankreich
Produktionsjahr: 2019
FSK-Freigabe: ab 12 Jahren

Regie: Julie Delpy
Besetzung: Julie Delpy, Sophia Ally, Richard Armitage, Daniel Brühl, Gemma Arterton, Saleh Bakri, Kerem Can, Lindsay Duncan, Julia Effertz, Patrick Güldenberg


Kurzinhalt:

Nach der Scheidung von ihrem Mann James (Richard Armitage) ist die Genetikerin Isabelle (Julie Delpy) dabei, sich ein neues Leben aufzubauen. Immerhin scheint der Sorgerechtsstreit um ihre gemeinsame Tochter Zoe (Sophia Ally) so gut wie abgeschlossen, selbst wenn Isabelle mehr Zugeständnisse machen muss, als sie ursprünglich wollte. Doch dann wird Zoe überraschend krank und nach einer Notoperation im Krankenhaus, müssen sich Isabelle und James trotz kurzzeitiger Hoffnung mit dem Schlimmsten abfinden. Während James den Verlust zu akzeptieren versucht, nimmt Isabelle ihr Schicksal selbst in die Hand und sucht den Arzt Thomas Fischer (Daniel Brühl) auf, der auf Grund seiner Arbeit mit Frau Laura (Gemma Arterton) nach Moskau emigrierte. Worum Isabelle ihn bittet, ist medizinisch nicht unmöglich – und doch undenkbar …


Kritik:


Julie Delpys My Zoe ist ein Drama. In mehrfacher Hinsicht. Es ist ein Film über eine gescheiterte Ehe, über ein Leben, das viel zu früh endet, und über eine Mutter, die diesen Verlust nicht verwinden kann. Zu welcher Entscheidung sie im Anschluss kommt, was sie bereit ist, zu tun, sollte das Publikum aufwühlen, ein moralisches Dilemma darstellen. Aber nicht nur, dass der Film keine Antworten auf wichtige Fragen gibt, er stellt die Fragen nicht einmal mit dem Nachdruck, dass man sich damit auseinandersetzen müsste.

Dass sich die Geschichte dorthin entwickelt, mag man zu Beginn nicht glauben. Sie spielt – nach einer verräterischen, kurzen Einstellung, die für das Ende von Bedeutung ist – in naher Zukunft in Berlin. Genetikerin Isabelle lebt von ihrem Mann getrennt und der Streit um das gemeinsame Sorgerecht für Tochter Zoe hat beinahe sein Ende erreicht. Ihretwegen halten sich die Erwachsenen zurück, doch die Gräben zwischen ihnen sind immer noch tief. Dabei gibt sich das Drehbuch, das ebenfalls von der auch als Hauptdarstellerin agierenden Delpy stammt, erstaunlich bedeckt, wenn es darum geht, Schuldzuweisungen vorzunehmen, wer von ihnen für das Scheitern der Beziehung verantwortlich ist. Scheint ihr Ex-Mann James zu aggressiv und gegebenenfalls sogar gewaltbereit, selbst wenn nie ein Ausbruch seinerseits zu sehen ist, bleibt bei Isabelle das Gefühl, dass sie mit ihrer beruflichen Situation Zoe nicht so viel Zeit widmen kann, wie das interessierte Mädchen verdient. In jedem Fall wendet sich für Isabelle das Leben zum Besseren: Sie hat Aussicht auf einen neuen Posten und auch einen neuen Mann in ihrem Leben. Bis eine Tragödie geschieht.

Es ist schwierig über das, was danach geschieht, zu sprechen, ohne wichtige Eckpunkte des Films vorweg zu nehmen, selbst wenn die Filmvorschau dies genügend andeutet, so dass es an sich nicht als Spoiler angesehen werden kann. Es soll genügen zu sagen, dass Isabelle, die bereits als Zoe Nachmittage bei ihrem Vater verbringt, regelmäßig mit Text- und Sprachnachrichten nachfragt, ob alles in Ordnung ist, den Verlust ihres Kindes nicht akzeptiert. Während James daran zu zerbrechen droht, ergreift sie die Initiative, die mit ihrer beruflichen Tätigkeit zu tun hat. So wendet sie sich in Moskau an den Arzt einer Fruchtbarkeitsklinik, gespielt von Daniel Brühl. Das Thema, das Filmemacherin Julie Delpy in My Zoe aufgreift, könnte aktueller und schwieriger kaum sein. Doch bis es soweit ist, vergeht sehr viel Zeit, mehr als die Hälfte des Films, genauer gesagt. Dabei beschäftigt sich die Filmemacherin in ausladenden Szenen mit Dingen, die am Ende mit der eigentlichen Geschichte, mit dem Kernanliegen, das Isabelle beschäftigt, nicht wirklich zu tun haben. So wird beispielsweise die Behandlung Zoes durch die Rettungskräfte in großen Details geschildert. Selbst bis es soweit ist, dass es Zoe merklich schlechter geht, beschäftigt sich der Film lange mit Isabelles neuer Liebschaft und verbringt Zeit auf Nebenschauplätzen. Danach werden die zermürbenden Zwischenstationen gezeigt, die die hilflosen Eltern in Anbetracht der Situation ihrer Tochter durchstehen müssen.

So bleibt lange die Frage beim Publikum, was My Zoe denn sein will: Ein Sorgerechtsdrama mit zwei grundverschiedenen Elternteilen, oder eine Charakterstudie um eine Mutter, die auf Grund ihrer privaten Situation anfangs wohl nicht die Beziehung zu ihrer Tochter hatte, die die meisten Mütter haben? Zeitweise scheint es ein Drama um den schwersten Verlust, den Eltern nur erleiden können, und dann doch wieder ein Film, der sein Publikum mit einer Schicksalsfrage um Machbarkeit und Ethik konfrontiert.

Mag sein, dass Isabelle von den Ereignissen in ihrem Leben getrieben wird, und ihre jeweilige Situation nur ein Ergebnis des Weges, der sie dorthin gebracht hat. Allerdings macht der Film inhaltliche wie zeitliche Sprünge, die umso mehr den Eindruck verstärken, dass was in den jeweiligen Abschnitten erzählt wird, nicht notwendigerweise aus ein- und demselben Film stammen müsste. Die verschiedenen Aspekte passen nur bedingt zusammen und hätten gleichzeitig deutlich straffer erzählt werden können.

Was tadellos funktioniert, ist die Besetzung, angeführt von einer packenden Julie Delpy, die die Verletzlichkeit, die Wut und die unbändige Entschlossenheit ihrer Figur ebenso zum Ausdruck bringt, wie die alles lähmende Trauer. Doch das macht Isabelles Verhalten nicht nachvollziehbarer. Anders bei dem von Richard Armitage gespielten Ex-Mann James, der lange Zeit Ankerpunkt des Publikums ist, bis das Drehbuch ihn aus den Augen verliert.

Handwerklich gibt es bei My Zoe nichts zu bemängeln, die Umsetzung, auch mit den subtilen Andeutungen, dass die Geschichte in der Zukunft angesiedelt ist, ist tadellos und offenbart oft einen Blick für Details und die Emotionen der Figuren, ohne sie zu sehr ins Zentrum zu rücken. Schade, dass die Geschichte nicht mit ähnlichem Fokus erzählt ist.


Fazit:

Wenn Isabelle feststellt, „Es gibt keine Bezeichnung für Eltern, die ein Kind verlieren“, und ergänzt, dass es den Begriff der Waisen oder der Witwen gibt, doch für ihre Situation nichts Passendes, dann trifft diese Aussage ins Mark. Doch wieso dieser Verlust so unbegreiflich ist, wird nicht an ihrer Figur deutlich. An ihr bricht sich vielmehr die Frage, welche Mittel zulässig wären, diesen Verlust zu überwinden. Zwar stellt My Zoe der medizinischen Machbarkeit das ethische Dilemma gegenüber, doch weshalb gerade Isabelles Situation ein Umdenken hervorrufen sollte, wird nicht klar. Filmemacherin Julie Delpy gelingt ein gut gespielter, stellenweise schonungsloser Film. Sie präsentiert ihre Figur ungefiltert, mit aller Vehemenz, die sie in der zweiten Hälfte aufbringt. Doch deren Ursprung erläutert sie nicht. Mit der offensichtlichen Aufteilung des Dramas, das in der zweiten Hälfte mit anderer Umgebung und anderen Figuren aus einem anderen Film zu sein scheint, entscheidet sich das Drehbuch zu spät, was es überhaupt sein will. Doch das heißt nicht, dass es keine inhaltlichen Diskussionen anregen wird.


https://treffpunkt-kritik.de/?id=2029

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 12.11.2019, 19:47 
Offline
Mill overseer & Head of the Berlin Station
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 30.08.2011, 10:28
Beiträge: 28833
Wohnort: Richard's Kingdom of Dreams
Vorsichtig kritisch ist 'Die Welt':

Zitat:
„My Zoe“ – Hamburg-Premiere
Stand: 07:09 Uhr | Lesedauer: 2 Minuten
0 Kommentare

Im neuen Film von Julie Delpy wird eine Familie von einem schlimmen Schicksalsschlag getroffen: Delpy spielt die Genetikerin Isabelle. Sie lebt in Berlin und teilt sich das Sorgerecht für ihre Tochter Zoe mit ihrem Ex-Mann James (Richard Armitage). Nach einem Unfall hat Zoe eine Hirnblutung. Die Ärzte wollen die Geräte abstellen – für die Eltern der größte Alptraum. Isabelle will den Tod ihrer Tochter nicht akzeptieren. Heimlich entnimmt sie Zoe kurz vor deren Tod Gewebeproben und reist damit nach Moskau; sie will ihre Tochter von einem Mediziner (Daniel Brühl) klonen lassen. Delpy hat hierbei auch das Drehbuch geschrieben und Regie geführt. „My Zoe“ unterscheidet sich deutlich von anderen Delpy-Werken, die meist redelastige Komödien oder leichtfüßige Liebesgeschichten waren. Dieses Mal legt die 49-Jährige ein hartes Familiendrama vor, das zugleich ein Science-Fiction-Film ist. Doch um die Auswirkungen, die Technik auf unsere Körper und Gefühle haben kann, geht es der Regisseurin nur am Rande. Im Vordergrund stehen immer die Gefühle der Protagonisten. Dadurch wirkt das Klon-Thema wie ein Fremdkörper, der den Film zwar um einen interessanten Dreh anreichert, aber nicht zu einer überzeugenden Geschichte heranwächst.

Im Abaton stellt der Produzent Malte Grunert „My Zoe“ Dienstag (20.30 Uhr) vor. Kinostart am 14.11.


https://www.welt.de/print/die_welt/hamburg/article203407196/Tipps-My-Zoe-Hamburg-Premiere.html


In der gleichen Tonlage, aber etwas kritischer dpa:

Zitat:
Klon-Thema
«My Zoe»: Drama mit Julie Delpy und Daniel Brühl


Im neuen Film von Julie Delpy trifft eine Familie ein schlimmer Schicksalsschlag. Wie gewohnt geht es bei der französischen Filmemacherin um zwischenmenschliche Konflikte - doch mit «My Zoe» betritt sie auch neue Wege.

Von dpa
Samstag, 09.11.2019, 12:58 Uhr aktualisiert: 11.11.2019, 11:00 Uhr


Berlin (dpa) - An der Seite von Ethan Hawke spielte sich Julie Delpy in melancholischen Dramen wie «Before Sunrise» in die Herzen der Zuschauer. Vor gut zehn Jahren trat die Französin dann erstmals selbst hinter die Kamera und stellte mit der Komödie «2 Tage Paris» ihr Regiedebüt vor.

Nun folgt ihre mittlerweile fünfte Regiearbeit: In «My Zoe» geht es, wie bei der französischen Filmemacherin üblich, um zwischenmenschliche Konflikte - dieses Mal ist neben Delpy auch Daniel Brühl auf der Leinwand zu sehen.

Delpy spielt die Genetikerin Isabelle. Sie lebt in Berlin und teilt sich das Sorgerecht für ihre Tochter Zoe mit ihrem Ex-Mann James ( Richard Armitage ). Die beiden sind typische Helikopter-Eltern und schwirren ständig um Zoe herum. Ihnen dabei zuzusehen, wie sie sich gegenseitig in der Sorge um ihre Tochter übertrumpfen wollen, ist allerdings mühsam. Das Ex-Paar streitet sich - über lange Szenen des Films.

Anders als in früheren Werken Delpys bleiben die Dialoge nun aber hölzern und oberflächlich. Man könnte auch sagen: Die beiden nerven ganz schön. Wer wohlwollend ist, kann bei Delpy, die auch als Drehbuchautorin fungierte, einen dramaturgischen Kniff erkennen: Denn obwohl die Eltern scheinbar so sehr um ihre Tochter kreisen, können sie nicht verhindern, dass ihr etwas Schlimmes zustößt.

Nach einem Unfall hat Zoe eine Hirnblutung. Weil ihre Hirntätigkeit gleich null ist, wollen die Ärzte die Geräte abstellen. Für die beiden Eltern ist das der größte Alptraum - und Isabelle will den Tod ihrer Tochter nicht akzeptieren. Heimlich entnimmt sie Zoe kurz vor deren Tod Gewebeproben und reist damit nach Moskau: Isabelle hat einen Termin beim Arzt Thomas (Daniel Brühl), der in Russland eine Fruchtbarkeitsklinik leitet. Er soll ihr helfen, ihre Tochter zu klonen.

«My Zoe» unterscheidet sich damit deutlich von anderen Delpy-Werken, die meist redelastige Komödien oder leichtfüßige Liebesgeschichten waren. Dieses Mal legt die 49-Jährige ein hartes Familiendrama vor, das zugleich ein Science-Fiction-Film ist. Tatsächlich spielt «My Zoe» in der nahen Zukunft. Subtil streut Delpy futuristische Hinweise: hier ein Notebook, das sich zer- und entknüllen kann, da eine sich aalglatt ums Handgelenk schlängelnde Digitaluhr.

Doch um die Auswirkungen, die Technik auf unsere Körper und Gefühle haben kann, geht es der Regisseurin nur am Rande. Im Vordergrund stehen immer die Gefühle der Protagonisten. Dadurch wirkt das Klon-Thema allerdings wie ein Fremdkörper, der den Film zwar um einen interessanten Dreh anreichert, letztendlich aber nicht zu einer überzeugenden Geschichte heranwächst. Von Filmen wie Spike Jonzes «Her» oder Serien wie «Black Mirror» weiß man, dass das deutlich mutiger, spannender - und auch emotionaler geht. Trotz guter Ideen kann «Zoe» daher nicht über gut 90 Minuten überzeugen.

My Zoe, Deutschland/Frankreich/Großbritannien 2019, 93 Min., FSK ab 12, von Julie Delpy, mit Julie Delpy, Richard Armitage, Daniel Brühl, Sophia Ally


https://www.wn.de/Welt/Kultur/Kino/4027744-Klon-Thema-My-Zoe-Drama-mit-Julie-Delpy-und-Daniel-Bruehl


Und hier noch ein Verriss:

Zitat:
12.11.2019 06:14 501

"My Zoe" und das Klonen von Embryos: Moralisch komplett verwerflich!
My Zoe läuft ab dem 14. November in den deutschen Kinos


Von Stefan Bröhl

Deutschland - Abstoßend! "My Zoe" von Regisseurin Julie Delpy ("2 Tage New York") ist ein moralisch komplett verwerflicher, einseitiger und deshalb ärgerlicher Film geworden.

Danach sah es zu Beginn noch nicht aus. Dort wird die in Berlin lebende Familie rund um die Genetikerin Isabelle Perrault (Julie Delpy), Architekt James Lewis (Richard Armitage) und ihre gemeinsame Tochter Zoe (Sophia Ally) in typischer Delpy-Manier eingeführt.

Isabelle und James sind geschieden, die Spannungen zwischen ihnen groß, weil sich beide emotional viel angetan haben und noch immer antun.

So wird um Zeit mit Zoe gerungen, die davon nichts mitbekommen soll. Kurzfristig einzuspringen fällt den beiden Workaholics schwer, weshalb die junge Magda (Tijan Marei) immer wieder als Babysitterin einspringt.

Eines Tages geschieht dann ein furchtbares Unglück. Zoe erwacht nicht wieder aus dem Schlaf! Wie später herauskommt hat sie sich beim Toben auf dem Spielplatz den Kopf angestoßen.

Da sie keine Anzeichen einer ernsthaften Erkrankung zeigte, ging Magda mit ihr nicht zum Arzt.

Nun muss sogar der Notarzt gerufen werden. Im Krankenhaus erklärt ihnen die zuständige Ärztin Dr. Haas (Jördis Triebel), dass Zoe schnellstmöglich operiert werden muss. Denn sie hat schwere Hirnblutungen erlitten...
Julie Delpy hat mit "My Zoe" einen moralisch äußerst fragwürdigen Film gedreht

Diese Geschichte hat Delpy äußerst fragwürdig umgesetzt. Denn in der Folge setzt die Regisseurin, die auch die weibliche Hauptrolle spielt, ihrer Figur in den Kopf, ihr Kind um jeden Preis so wiederzubekommen wie es war - und deshalb zu klonen!

Dafür reist sie sogar nach Moskau, wo ihr der ausgewanderte deutsche Doktor Thomas Fischer (Daniel Brühl) helfen soll, das für viel Geld zu ermöglichen.

Fassungslos schaut man zu, wie Delpy ohne jegliche Moral die gestörten Handlungen ihres Charakters nicht mal im entferntesten reflektiert und die ganzen Probleme, die mit dem Klonen einhergehen, außen vor lässt.

Und das war es noch nicht: Sie drückt dabei sogar noch auf die Tränendrüse, damit die Zuschauer mit ihrer unsympathischen Figur mitfiebern.

Das funktioniert überhaupt nicht, weil Isabelle trotz ihres schweren Schicksals keinerlei Mitleid erregt, kein Identifikationspotenzial bietet und sie mit zunehmendem Verlauf immer nerviger und abstoßender wird, obwohl ihre Handlungen zumindest im Ansatz nachzuvollziehen sind. Auch die anderen Protagonisten vermögen es nicht, das Publikum mitzureißen.

Das ist schade, denn die schön ausgesuchten Locations in Berlin und Moskau überzeugen ebenso wie die gute Kameraführung und der an sich interessante Ansatz.
Nervige Dialoge, schwaches Drehbuch: Auch Daniel Brühl und Richard Armitage retten "My Zoe" nicht

Dazu inszeniert Delpy das Familiendrama mit Tiefe und durchaus auch mit einer Portion Realismus, überspitzt das Geschehen dann aber zu häufig zu sehr.

Es gibt in den durchwachsenen Dialogen immer die gleichen Spitzen, die dann wiederum zum Ausraster führen.

Das dürfte deshalb bestenfalls Fans der "Before"-Trilogie gefallen , wo Delpy und Ethan Hawke Seite an Seite spielten und zankten.

Schade ist, dass sie mit Brühl ("The First Avenger: Civil War"), Armitage (Thorin Eichenschild in "Der Hobbit"-Trilogie), Gemma Arterton ("Prince of Persia: Der Sand der Zeit") und vielen deutschen Stars einen namhaften Cast für ihren siebten Langspielfilm als Regisseurin hat gewinnen können.

Glänzen kann allerdings keiner von ihnen, dafür fehlt es ihren Rollen an Strahlkraft, dem Drehbuch an Qualität, nutzt sich der Stil viel zu schnell ab und langweilt immer mehr.

Daher ist "My Zoe" ein moralisch verachtenswertes Familiendrama geworden, das gefährliche Botschaften ungefiltert transportiert und als korrekt darstellt. Dazu nerven die ständigen Streitereien und die unsympathischen Figuren, sodass man wegen der Machart mit viel Wut im Bauch aus dem Film geht.


https://www.tag24.de/nachrichten/my-zoe-julie-delpy-daniel-bruehl-richard-armitage-gemma-arterton-triebel-klonen-von-embryos-kino-1255957

Man darf einen Film verreißen, wenn er einem nicht gefällt, aber die Art und Weise, der Ton und die Sprache sowie die Stoßrichtung dieser Kritik sind recht eigenartig (und entspricht damit in gewisser Weise genau dem Kritisierten), wie ich finde. :scratch:

_________________
Bild

Danke, liebe Boardengel, für Eure privaten Schnappschüsse. :kuss:


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Reviews zu 'My Zoe'
BeitragVerfasst: 12.11.2019, 20:40 
Offline
Macavity's mischievous mistress
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 29.03.2012, 22:46
Beiträge: 16886
Da hast Du Recht, Laudine!

Ich weiß nicht, ob ich den Film sehen werde und kann gewisse Vorbehalte meinerseits nicht verleugnen, aber die zielen nicht in Richtung "moralisch verwerflich".
Der Ton der Kritik hat mich gleich irritiert und ich habe erst mal den Autor gegoogelt. Der jedoch durchaus ein versierter Filmkritiker zu sein scheint.

"Moralisch verwerflich" ist starker Tobak...

_________________
Bild


Nach oben
 Profil  
Mit Zitat antworten  
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:  Sortiere nach  
Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 28 Beiträge ]  Gehe zu Seite 1, 2  Nächste

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Wer ist online?

0 Mitglieder


Ähnliche Beiträge

Alice und die Filmkritik - Reviews
Forum: Alice in Wonderland (2016)
Autor: Laudine
Antworten: 12
Captain America Reviews
Forum: Captain America (2011)
Autor: Maike
Antworten: 7
'Sleepwalker'-Reviews
Forum: Sleepwalker (2017)
Autor: Laudine
Antworten: 15
Reaktionen und Reviews von Besuchern der Lodge
Forum: The Lodge (2019)
Autor: Laudine
Antworten: 62

Du darfst keine neuen Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst keine Antworten zu Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht ändern.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.

Suche nach:
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group



Bei iphpbb3.com bekommen Sie ein kostenloses Forum mit vielen tollen Extras
Forum kostenlos einrichten - Hot Topics - Tags
Beliebteste Themen: TV, Audi, Bild, Erde, NES

Impressum | Datenschutz